1994 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament

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1994 NCAA Women's Division I
Basketball Tournament
1994WomensFinalFourLogo.jpg
Teams 64
Finals site Richmond Coliseum
Richmond, Virginia
Champions North Carolina (1st title)
Runner-up Louisiana Tech (5th title game)
Semifinalists Purdue (1st Final Four)
Alabama (1st Final Four)
NCAA Women's Division I Tournaments
«1993 1995»

The 1994 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament featured 64 teams for the first time ever. The Final Four consisted of North Carolina, Purdue, Louisiana Tech, and Alabama, with North Carolina defeating Louisiana Tech 60-59 to win its first NCAA title on a 3 point shot by Charlotte Smith as time expired. The ball was inbounded with only 00:00.7 left on the clock, making it one of the most exciting finishes in tournament history.[1]

Notable events[edit]

The Alabama team was a six seed in the Midwest region. After beating the 11 seed Oregon State, they faced a higher seed, Iowa, who were seeded third in the region. Alabama won that game, and went on to face another higher seed in Texas Tech, the defending national champions. Alabama won again, and went on to face Penn State, the top seed in the region. Alabama won yet again, this time by 14 points, to advance to their first final Four.[2]

In the semi-final game of the Final Four, they faced Louisiana Tech, a team they had played earlier in the year. In their December match-up, Alabama had beaten the Lady Techsters by 22 points, 99–77. In this game La tech opened up a six point lead at the half. Alabama's All-American guard Niesa Johnson cut her hand on a locker room sink, which required seven stitches. Because it was such an important game, Johnson was bandaged and medicated and returned to the game. The Alabama team fought back from an eleven pint deficit and cut the margin to two points with seconds to play. The plan was to get the ball to Betsy Harris to attempt a three point play, but Harris stepped out of bounds. After a made free throw, they had one more chance with a three point attempt but it failed, and La Tech moved on to the championship game.[2]

In the other semifinal game, the North Carolina team faced Purdue. North Carolina's Charlotte Smith was expected to be an important key to the game, and the Purdue coach, Lin Dunn, tried to prepare the team to handle Smith. That planning was ineffective, as Smith scored 23 points, and set a personal career records for assists with eight. The Purdue team was down 13 points in the first half, but fought back and managed to take a two point lead in the second half. However, the Tar Heels switched to a zone defense after made baskets, and retook the lead, ending up with an 89–74 victory, and the first North Carolin team to make it to the Championship game.[3]

In addition to Charlotte Smith, North Carolina had a freshman guard Marion Jones who would later be known for world class performances in track and filed. Jones picked up her third foul only six minutes in the game and had to sit. This "rattled" the North Carolina team but they kept the game close. When the game drew to a close, the La Tech team had a two point advantage with less than a second on the clock, but North Carolina had the ball. With 0.7 seconds left, there was just enough time to catch and shoot. The ball was in bounded to Charlotte Smith who had made only eight three pointers on 31 attempts during the season. Smith launched the ball, but never saw what happened as her vision was blocked. Her teammates mobbed her, and she realized she had hit the shot to complete one of the most dramatic finishes in NCAA Championship history. North Carolina won the Championship 60–59.[4][5]

Tournament records[edit]

  • Rebounds - Charlotte Smith recorded 23 rebounds in the championship game between North Carolina and Louisiana Tech, the most number of rebounds recorded in a Final Four game. The result is also a tie for the most number of rebounds in an NCAA Tournament game.
  • Winning Margin - Tennessee beat North Carolina A&T by a score of 111–37. The 74 point margin is the largest ever record in an NCAA Tournament game.
  • Three-point field goals - Betsy Harris scored 20 three point attempts in the tournament, tied for the most ever scored in a complete tournament. Harris scored the baskets in five games, while the two other record holders, Diana Taurasi and Maya Moore, accomplished the feat in six games.[6][7]

Qualifying teams - automatic[edit]

Sixty-four teams were selected to participate in the 1994 NCAA Tournament. Thirty-two conferences were eligible for an automatic bid to the 1994 NCAA tournament.[6]

Automatic Bids
    Record  
Qualifying School Conference Regular
Season
Conference Seed
Bowling Green State University MAC 26–3 17–1 7
Brown University Ivy League 18–9 11–3 16
University of Connecticut Big East 27–2 17–1 1
Florida International University Trans America 25–3 11–1 8
Fordham University Patriot League 21–8 11–3 16
Georgia Southern University Southern Conference 21–8 11–2 14
Grambling State University SWAC 23–6 11–3 15
University of Wisconsin–Green Bay Mid-Continent 18–10 13–5 15
Louisiana Tech University Sun Belt Conference 26–3 14–0 4
Loyola University Maryland MAAC 18–10 12–2 14
University of Missouri Big Eight 12–17 3–11 15
Missouri State University Missouri Valley Conference 23–5 15–1 6
University of Montana Big Sky Conference 24–4 12–2 7
Mount St. Mary's University Northeast Conference 25–3 18–0 14
NC A&T MEAC 19–10 11–5 16
University of North Carolina ACC 27–2 14–2 3
University of Notre Dame Midwestern Collegiate 22–6 10–2 7
Old Dominion University Colonial 24–5 14–0 6
Pennsylvania State University Big Ten 25–2 16–2 1
University of Portland West Coast Conference 17–11 7–7 15
Radford University Big South Conference 18–11 12–6 16
Rutgers University Atlantic 10 22–7 13–3 5
San Diego State University WAC 25–4 13–1 5
University of Southern California Pac-12 23–3 16–2 2
Stephen F. Austin State University Southland 23–6 16–2 8
University of Tennessee SEC 29–1 11–0 1
Tennessee State University Ohio Valley Conference 20–8 13–3 13
University of Texas at Austin Southwest 21–8 10–4 5
University of Alabama at Birmingham Great Midwest 23–5 12–0 10
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Big West Conference 23–6 14–4 10
University of Vermont North Atlantic Conference 19–10 9–5 13
Virginia Tech Metro 24–5 9–3 8

Qualifying teams - at-large[edit]

Thirty-two additional teams were selected to complete the sixty-four invitations.[6]

At-large Bids
    Record  
Qualifying School Conference Regular
Season
Conference Seed
University of Alabama Southeastern 22–6 7–4 6
Auburn University Southeastern 19–9 6–5 9
Boise State University Big Sky 23–5 12–2 9
Clemson University Atlantic Coast 19–9 11–5 9
University of Colorado at Boulder Big Eight 25–4 12–2 3
Creighton University Missouri Valley 23–6 14–2 10
University of Florida Southeastern 22–6 8–3 4
The George Washington University Atlantic 10 22–7 13–3 7
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Big West 25–4 16–2 12
Indiana University Big Ten 19–8 10–8 12
University of Iowa Big Ten 20–6 13–5 3
University of Kansas Big Eight 21–5 11–3 9
Marquette University Great Midwest 22–6 10–2 14
University of Minnesota Big Ten 17–10 10–8 10
University of Mississippi Southeastern 23–8 7–4 5
Northern Illinois University Mid-Continent 24–5 18–0 11
Oklahoma State University–Stillwater Big Eight 20–8 9–5 12
University of Oregon Pacific-10 19–8 13–5 6
Oregon State University Pacific-10 17–10 9–9 11
Purdue University Big Ten 25–4 16–2 1
Santa Clara University West Coast 21–6 11–3 11
Seton Hall University Big East 25–4 16–2 4
Southern Methodist University Southwest 18–8 8–6 13
University of Southern Mississippi Metro 24–4 10–2 4
Saint Joseph's University Atlantic 10 19–8 11–5 11
Stanford University Pacific-10 22–5 15–3 2
Texas A&M University Southwest 21–7 11–3 13
Texas Tech University Southwest 26–4 12–2 2
Vanderbilt University Southeastern 23–7 9–2 2
University of Virginia Atlantic Coast 25–4 15–1 3
University of Washington Pacific-10 20–7 12–6 8
Western Kentucky University Sun Belt 23–9 11–3 12

Bids by conference[edit]

Thirty-two conferences earned an automatic bid. In sixteen cases, the automatic bid was the only representative from the conference. Thirty-two additional at-large teams were selected from sixteen of the conferences.[6]

Bids Conference Teams
6 Southeastern Tennessee, Alabama, Auburn, Florida, Mississippi, Vanderbilt
5 Big Ten Penn St., Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Purdue
5 Pacific-10 Southern California, Oregon, Oregon St., Stanford, Washington
4 Big Eight Missouri, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma St.
4 Southwest Texas, SMU, Texas A&M, Texas Tech
3 Atlantic 10 Rutgers, George Washington, St. Joseph’s
3 Atlantic Coast North Carolina, Clemson, Virginia
2 Big East Connecticut, Seton Hall
2 Big Sky Montana, Boise St.
2 Big West UNLV, Hawaii
2 Great Midwest UAB, Marquette
2 Metro Virginia Tech, Southern Miss.
2 Mid-Continent Green Bay, Northern Ill.
2 Missouri Valley Missouri St., Creighton
2 Sun Belt Louisiana Tech, Western Ky.
2 West Coast Portland, Santa Clara
1 Big South Radford
1 Colonial Old Dominion
1 Ivy Brown
1 Metro Atlantic Loyola Md.
1 Mid-American Bowling Green
1 Mid-Eastern N.C. A&T
1 Midwestern Notre Dame
1 North Atlantic Vermont
1 Northeast Mt. St. Mary’s
1 Ohio Valley Tennessee St.
1 Patriot Fordham
1 Southern Ga. Southern
1 Southland Stephen F. Austin
1 Southwestern Grambling
1 Trans America FIU
1 Western Athletic San Diego St.

Bids by state[edit]

The sixty-four teams came from thirty-six states, plus Washington, D.C. Texas had the most teams with five bids. Fourteen states did not have any teams receiving bids.[6]

NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1994
Bids State Teams
5 Texas Stephen F. Austin, Texas, SMU, Texas A&M, Texas Tech
4 California San Diego St., Southern California, Santa Clara, Stanford
4 Virginia Old Dominion, Radford, Virginia Tech, Virginia
3 Alabama UAB, Alabama, Auburn
3 Indiana Notre Dame, Indiana, Purdue
3 Oregon Portland, Oregon, Oregon St.
3 Tennessee Tennessee, Tennessee St., Vanderbilt
2 Florida FIU, Florida
2 Louisiana Grambling, Louisiana Tech
2 Maryland Loyola Md., Mt. St. Mary’s
2 Mississippi Mississippi, Southern Miss.
2 Missouri Missouri, Missouri St.
2 New Jersey Rutgers, Seton Hall
2 North Carolina N.C. A&T, North Carolina
2 Pennsylvania Penn St., St. Joseph’s
2 Wisconsin Green Bay, Marquette
1 Colorado Colorado
1 Connecticut Connecticut
1 District of Columbia George Washington
1 Georgia Ga. Southern
1 Hawaii Hawaii
1 Idaho Boise St.
1 Illinois Northern Ill.
1 Iowa Iowa
1 Kansas Kansas
1 Kentucky Western Ky.
1 Minnesota Minnesota
1 Montana Montana
1 Nebraska Creighton
1 Nevada UNLV
1 New York Fordham
1 Ohio Bowling Green
1 Oklahoma Oklahoma St.
1 Rhode Island Brown
1 South Carolina Clemson
1 Vermont Vermont
1 Washington Washington

Brackets[edit]

First and second round games played at higher seed except where noted.

East Region[edit]

First round
March 13 and 14

Higher Seed's Home Court

Second round
March 15 and 16

Higher Seed's Home Court

Regional semifinals
March 21

Piscataway, NJ

Regional finals
March 23

Piscataway, NJ

                       
1 Connecticut 79
16 Brown 60
1 Connecticut 81
9 Auburn 59
8 Virginia Tech 51
9 Auburn 60
1 Connecticut 78
4 Southern Mississippi 64
5 Rutgers 73
12 Western Kentucky 84
12 Western Kentucky 69
4 Southern Mississippi 72
4 Southern Mississippi 86
13 Tennessee State 72
1 Connecticut 69
3 North Carolina 81
6 Old Dominion 56
11 Saint Joseph's 55
6 Old Dominion 52
3 North Carolina 62
3 North Carolina 101
14 Georgia Southern 53
3 North Carolina 73
2 Vanderbilt 69
7 Notre Dame 76
10 Minnesota 81
10 Minnesota 72
2 Vanderbilt 98
2 Vanderbilt 95
15 Grambling State 85

Mideast Region[edit]

First round
March 12 and 13

Higher Seed's Home Court

Second round
March 14 and 15

Higher Seed's Home Court

Regional semifinals
March 21

Fayetteville, AR

Regional finals
March 23

Fayetteville, AR

                       
1 Tennessee 111
16 North Carolina A&T 37
1 Tennessee 78
9 Clemson 66
8 Florida International 64
9 Clemson 65
1 Tennessee 68
4 Louisiana Tech 71
5 Mississippi 83
12 Indiana 61
5 Mississippi 67
4 Louisiana Tech 82
4 Louisiana Tech 96
13 SMU 62
4 Louisiana Tech 75
2 Southern California 66
6 SW Missouri State 75
11 Northern Illinois 56
6 SW Missouri St. 63
3 Virginia 67
3 Virginia 72
14 Loyola-MD 47
3 Virginia 66
2 Southern California 85
7 George Washington 74
10 UAB 66
7 George Washington 72
2 Southern California 76
2 Southern California 77
15 Portland 62

Midwest Region[edit]

First round
March 12 and 13

Higher Seed's Home Court

Second round
March 14 and 15

Higher Seed's Home Court

Regional semifinals
March 20

Austin, TX

Regional finals
March 22

Austin, TX

                       
1 Penn State 94
16 Fordham 41
1 Penn State 85
9 Kansas 68
8 Stephen F. Austin 62
9 Kansas 72
1 Penn State 64
4 Seton Hall 60
5 Texas 75
12 Oklahoma State 67
5 Texas 66
4 Seton Hall 71
4 Seton Hall 70
13 Vermont 60
1 Penn State 82
6 Alabama 96
6 Alabama 96
11 Oregon State 86
6 Alabama 84
3 Iowa 78
3 Iowa 70
14 Mount St. Mary's 47
6 Alabama 73
2 Texas Tech 68
7 Bowling Green 73
10 Creighton 84
10 Creighton 64
2 Texas Tech 75
2 Texas Tech 75
15 Missouri 61

West Region[edit]

First round
March 16

Higher Seed's Home Court

Second round
March 19 and 20

Higher Seed's Home Court

Regional semifinals
March 24

Stanford, CA

Regional finals
March 26

Stanford, CA

                       
1 Purdue 103
16 Radford 56
1 Purdue 86
8 Washington 59
8 Washington 89
9 Boise State 61
1 Purdue 82
13 Texas A&M 56
5 San Diego State 81
12 Hawaiʻi 75
5 San Diego State 72
13 Texas A&M 75
4 Florida 76
13 at Texas A&M 78
1 Purdue 82
2 Stanford 65
6 Oregon 74
11 Santa Clara 59
6 Oregon 71
3 Colorado 92
3 Colorado 77
14 Marquette 74
3 Colorado 62
2 Stanford 78
7 Montana 77
10 UNLV 67
7 Montana 62
2 Stanford 66
2 Stanford 81
15 Wisconsin-Green Bay 56

Final Four[edit]

National Semifinals
March 27
National Championship
March 29
           
3E North Carolina 89
1W Purdue 74
3E North Carolina 60
4ME Louisiana Tech 59
4ME Louisiana Tech 69
6MW Alabama 66

E-East; ME-Mideast; MW-Midwest; W-West.

Record by conference[edit]

Eighteen conferences had more than one bid, or at least one win in NCAA Tournament play:[6]

Conference # of Bids Record Win % Round
of 32
Sweet
Sixteen
Elite
Eight
Final
Four
Championship
Game
Southeastern 6 10–6 .625 5 3 1 1
Big Ten 5 9–5 .643 4 2 2 1
Pacific-10 5 8–5 .615 4 2 2
Southwest 4 5–4 .556 3 2
Big Eight 4 3–4 .429 2 1
Atlantic Coast 3 9–2 .818 3 2 1 1 1
Atlantic 10 3 1–3 .250 1
Sun Belt 2 6–2 .750 2 1 1 1 1
Big East 2 5–2 .714 2 2 1
Metro 2 2–2 .500 1 1
Missouri Valley 2 2–2 .500 2
Big Sky 2 1–2 .333 1
Big West 2 0–2
Great Midwest 2 0–2
Mid-Continent 2 0–2
West Coast 2 0–2
Colonial 1 1–1 .500 1
Western Athletic 1 1–1 .500 1

Fourteen conferences went 0-1: Big South Conference, Ivy League, MAAC, MAC, MEAC, Midwestern Collegiate, North Atlantic Conference, Northeast Conference, Ohio Valley Conference, Patriot League, Southern Conference, Southland, SWAC,and Trans America [6]

All-Tournament Team[edit]

Game Officials[edit]

  • Dee Kantner (Semi-Final)
  • Violet Palmer (Semi-Final)
  • Sally Bell (Semi-Final)
  • Sidney Bunch (Semi-Final)
  • Sally Bell (Final)
  • John Morningstar (Final) [6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gregory Cooper. "1994 NCAA National Championship Tournament". Archived from the original on 2009-10-21. Retrieved 2008-03-29. 
  2. ^ a b Deardorff, Julie (April 3, 1994). "La. Tech Has Overcome A Cold, Gloomy December". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  3. ^ Kent, Milton (April 3, 1994). "North Carolina races past Purdue to final". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  4. ^ Anderson, Kelli (November 28, 1994). "A Key Performer". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  5. ^ Anderson, Kelli (April 11, 1994). "Beat The Clock". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Nixon, Rick. "Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book". NCAA. Retrieved 22 April 2012. 
  7. ^ "Championship records remembered". NCAA. Retrieved 22 Sep 2012.