1994 in sports

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1994 in sports describes the year's events in world sport.


Years in sports: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s 2020s
Years: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

Alpine skiing[edit]

American football[edit]

Association football[edit]

  • July 2 – death of Andrés Escobar, Colombian player, who was shot dead apparently because of an own goal he had scored in a World Cup match

Athletics[edit]

Australian rules football[edit]

Baseball[edit]

Boxing[edit]

Canadian football[edit]

Cycling[edit]

Dogsled racing[edit]

Field Hockey[edit]

  • Men's Champions Trophy: Pakistan
  • Men's World Cup: Pakistan
  • Women's World Cup: Australia

Figure skating[edit]

Gaelic Athletic Association[edit]

Golf[edit]

Men's professional

Men's amateur

Women's professional

Handball[edit]

  • Men's European Championship: Sweden
  • Women's European Championship: Denmark

Harness racing[edit]

Horse racing[edit]

Steeplechases

Flat races

Ice hockey[edit]

Kickboxing[edit]

The following is a list of major noteworthy kickboxing events during 1994 in chronological order.

Before 2000, K-1 was considered the only major kickboxing promotion in the world.

Date Event Location Attendance Notes
March 4 K-1 Challenge Japan Tokyo, Japan 15,000
April 30 K-1 Grand Prix '94 Japan Tokyo, Japan 11,000 Second K-1 World Grand Prix. Tournament features eight competitors, rather than sixteen like the year before.
May 8 K-2 Plus Tournament 1994 Netherlands Amsterdam, Netherlands Features eight-man light heavyweight (76–79 kg/167-174 lbs) tournament. First K-1 event held outside of Japan.
September 18 K-1 Revenge Japan Tokyo, Japan 14,000
December 10 K-1 Legend Japan Nagoya, Japan 9,550 First K-1 event to feature a mixed martial arts bout.

Lacrosse[edit]

Mixed martial arts[edit]

The following is a list of major noteworthy MMA events during 1994 in chronological order.

Before 1997, the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) was considered the only major MMA organization in the world and featured many fewer rules than are used in modern MMA.

Date Event Alternate Name/s Location Attendance PPV Buyrate Notes
March 11 UFC 2: No Way Out UFC 2
The Ultimate Fighting Championship 2
United States Denver, Colorado, US 2,000 300,000 UFC rule change, time limits were dropped. Groin strikes became legal again, however still illegal to grab the genitals. Cage design was modified.

The first and only sixteen-man tournament in UFC history.

September 9 UFC 3: The American Dream N/A United States Charlotte, North Carolina, US N/A N/A UFC rule change, referee is officially given the right to stop a fight. Kicking with shoes is banned, however this rule was quickly discarded.
December 16 UFC 4: Revenge of the Warriors N/A United States Tulsa, Oklahoma, US 5,857 N/A UFC rule change, After tournament alternate Steve Jennum won UFC 3 by winning only one bout, alternates (replacements) were required to win a pre-tournament bout to qualify for the role of an alternate.


See also: 1994 in Pancrase

Motor racing[edit]

Professional Wrestling[edit]

Radiosport[edit]

Rugby league[edit]

Rugby union[edit]

Snooker[edit]

Swimming[edit]

Tennis[edit]

Triathlon[edit]

Volleyball[edit]

  • Men's World League: Italy
  • Men's World Championship: Italy
  • Men's European Beach Volleyball Championships: Jan Kvalheim and Bjørn Maaseide (Norway)
  • Women's World Grand Prix: Brazil
  • Women's World Championship: Cuba
  • Women's European Beach Volleyball Championships: Beate Bühler and Danja Müsch (Germany)

Water polo[edit]

  • Men's World Championship: Italy
  • Women's World Championship: Hungary

Awards[edit]

References[edit]