1996 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships

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1996 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships
Tournament details
Host country  Austria
Dates 21 April – 5 May
Teams 12
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg  Czech Republic (1st title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg  Canada
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg  United States
Fourth place  Russia
Tournament statistics
Matches played 40
Goals scored 249 (6.23 per match)
Attendance 186,830 (4,671 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Canada Yanic Perreault 9 points
1995
1997

The 1996 Ice Hockey World Championship took place in Austria 21 April - 5 May. The games were played in Vienna. Thirty-six nations competed at four levels, with Slovakia making their first appearance in Group A.

Twelve teams took part in Group A, with the first round split into two groups of six, with the first four from each group advancing to the quarter-finals. This was the 60th World Championship and the Czech Republic beat Canada in the final to become World Champions for the first time. (Czechoslovakia had won the World Championship six times). The final game was tied at two apiece before Martin Procházka scored with nineteen seconds left, an empty net goal sealed the victory.[1] In the bronze medal game, Brian Rolston scored at 4:48 of overtime to win the first medal in 34 years for team USA.[2][3] The unfortunate Russians did not lose a game in regulation time in the entire tournament, but finished fourth.

World Championship Group A (Austria)[edit]

First Round[edit]

Group 1[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points
1  Russia 5 5 0 0 23 - 08 10
2  United States 5 3 0 2 15 - 14 6
3  Canada 5 2 1 2 17 - 15 5
4  Germany 5 2 0 3 12 - 11 4
5  Slovakia 5 1 1 3 13 - 16 3
6  Austria 5 1 0 4 03 - 19 2
21 April Germany  1-2
 Russia
21 April Canada  3-3
 Slovakia
22 April Austria  1-5
 United States
22 April Russia  6-2
 Slovakia
23 April United States  4-2
 Germany
23 April Austria  0-4
 Canada
24 April Germany  5-1
 Canada
25 April Austria  2-1
 Slovakia
25 April United States  1-3
 Russia
26 April Austria  0-3
 Germany
26 April Russia  6-4
 Canada
27 April United States  4-3
 Slovakia
28 April Austria  0-6
 Russia
28 April Canada  5-1
 United States
29 April Slovakia  4-1
 Germany

Group 2[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points
1  Czech Republic 5 4 1 0 27 - 12 9
2  Finland 5 2 2 1 23 - 15 6
3  Sweden 5 2 2 1 14 - 12 6
4  Italy 5 2 1 2 20 - 26 5
5  Norway 5 1 2 2 06 - 11 4
6  France 5 0 0 5 12 - 26 0
21 April Czech Republic  3-1
 Sweden
21 April Finland  1-1
 Norway
22 April France  5-6
 Italy
23 April Italy  4-0
 Norway
23 April Finland  2-4
 Czech Republic
24 April Sweden  2-1
 France
24 April Norway  2-2
 Czech Republic
25 April France  3-6
 Finland
25 April Sweden  3-3
 Italy
26 April Italy  2-9
 Finland
27 April Czech Republic  9-2
 France
27 April Sweden  3-0
 Norway
28 April Italy  5-9
 Czech Republic
28 April Finland  5-5
 Sweden
29 April Norway  3-1
 France

Quarterfinals[edit]

30 April United States  3-2
 Sweden
30 April Finland  1-3
 Canada
1 May Russia  5-2
 Italy
1 May Czech Republic  6-1
 Germany

Consolation Round 11-12 Place[edit]

1 May Austria  3-6
 France
2 May Austria  3-6
 France

Austria was relegated to Group B.

Semifinals[edit]

3 May United States  0-5
 Czech Republic
3 May Canada  3-2 (GWS)
 Russia

Match for third place[edit]

4 May Russia  3-4 (OT)
 United States

Final[edit]

5 May
15:00
Czech Republic  4-2
(1-1, 1-1, 2-0)
 Canada Wiener Stadthalle, Wien
Attendance: 9,500

World Championship Group B (Netherlands)[edit]

Played 10–20 April in Eindhoven. Latvia won at this level for the first time. In their final game, superb goaltending by Arturs Irbe kept them in it, and a late tying goal by Olegs Znaroks sealed the tournament victory.[3] The final game had high drama for the host crowd, the Japanese and Danish teams among them. If the Netherlands were to lose to Poland, they would finish last and be relegated, a tie and Japan would be last, a win and Denmark would be last. A third period goal by Poland sealed Japan's fate.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points Tie breaker
H2H Points
13  Latvia 7 6 1 0 41 - 16 13
14  Switzerland 7 5 1 1 37 - 13 11
15  Belarus 7 5 0 2 29 - 18 10
16  Great Britain 7 4 1 2 29 - 23 9
17  Poland 7 1 2 4 18 - 27 4
18  Denmark 7 1 1 5 14 - 32 3 3
19  Netherlands 7 1 1 5 12 - 35 3 2
20  Japan 7 0 3 4 14 - 30 3 1

Latvia was promoted to Group A while Japan was relegated to Group C.

10 April Latvia  6-5
 Great Britain
10 April Poland  3-3
 Japan
10 April Netherlands  0-3
 Denmark
10 April Switzerland  2-4
 Belarus
11 April Japan  1-6
 Latvia
11 April Great Britain  2-7
 Switzerland
12 April Denmark  3-4
 Poland
12 April Netherlands  2-3
 Belarus
13 April Latvia  5-3
 Denmark
13 April Switzerland  7-2
 Japan
13 April Great Britain  4-2
 Poland
14 April Netherlands  2-6
 Great Britain
14 April Latvia  4-1
 Belarus
15 April Denmark  1-10
 Switzerland
15 April Poland  3-6
 Belarus
15 April Japan  1-2
 Netherlands
16 April Latvia  4-2
 Poland
16 April Japan  3-3
 Great Britain
17 April Belarus  6-1
 Denmark
17 April Switzerland  5-1
 Netherlands
18 April Poland  2-5
 Switzerland
18 April Netherlands  3-15
 Latvia
19 April Belarus  7-2
 Japan
19 April Great Britain  5-1
 Denmark
20 April Belarus  2-4
 Great Britain
20 April Denmark  2-2
 Japan
20 April Switzerland  1-1
 Latvia
20 April Poland  2-2
 Netherlands

World Championship Group C (Slovenia)[edit]

Played 22–31 March in Jesenice and Kranj. For the fourth year in row the Kazakhs and Ukrainians met in Group C. For the first time the Kazakhs came out on top, and it was the difference in winning the tournament.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points
21  Kazakhstan 7 6 0 1 51 - 10 12
22  Ukraine 7 6 0 1 40 - 13 12
23  Slovenia 7 5 0 2 41 - 19 10
24  Hungary 7 3 1 3 34 - 25 7
25  Estonia 7 3 1 3 36 - 29 7
26  Romania 7 3 0 4 32 - 27 6
27  China 7 1 0 6 17 - 68 2
28  Croatia 7 0 0 7 11 - 71 0

Kazakhstan was promoted to Group B while Croatia was relegated to Group D.

22 March Romania  9-2
 Croatia
22 March Estonia  13-2
 China
22 March Ukraine  4-1
 Hungary
22 March Slovenia  2-4
 Kazakhstan
23 March Hungary  2-7
 Kazakhstan
23 March Slovenia  4-1
 Romania
23 March China  2-7
 Ukraine
23 March Estonia  10-2
 Croatia
25 March Slovenia  6-3
 Estonia
25 March Ukraine  11-1
 Croatia
25 March Romania  3-5
 Hungary
25 March Kazakhstan  15-0
 China
26 March China  3-11
 Romania
26 March Kazakhstan  12-0
 Croatia
26 March Hungary  5-5
 Estonia
26 March Slovenia  2-4
 Ukraine
28 March Romania  2-3
 Estonia
28 March Croatia  4-6
 China
28 March Kazakhstan  3-2
 Ukraine
28 March Slovenia  4-3
 Hungary
29 March Ukraine  7-2
 Romania
29 March Croatia  0-10
 Hungary
29 March Estonia  0-7
 Kazakhstan
29 March Slovenia  10-2
 China
31 March Ukraine  5-2
 Estonia
31 March Slovenia  13-2
 Croatia
31 March Romania  4-3
 Kazakhstan
31 March China  2-8
 Hungary

World Championship Group D (Lithuania)[edit]

Played in Kaunas and Elektrenai 25–31 March. To narrow the field of the bottom tier to eight nations, two regional qualifying tournaments were used.

Qualifying Round[edit]

Group 1 (Australia)[edit]

Played 5th and 6 November 1995 in Sydney.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points
1  Australia 2 2 0 0 12 - 02 4
2  New Zealand 2 0 0 2 02 - 12 0
5 November 1995 Australia  6-0
 New Zealand
6 November 1995 Australia  6-2
 New Zealand

Group 2 (Israel)[edit]

Played 27–29 January 1996 in Metulla. The Greek team won both their games, but were found to have an ineligible roster, so both games were declared 5–0 forfeits in favour of the opposing team.[3]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Israel 2 2 0 0 24 - 00 4
2  Turkey 2 1 0 1 05 - 19 2
3  Greece 2 0 0 2 00 - 10 0
27 January 1996 Israel  1-4
5-0 by default

 Greece
28 January 1996 Turkey  0-19
5-0 by default

 Greece
29 January 1996 Israel  19-0
 Turkey

First Round[edit]

Group 1[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points
1  Yugoslavia 3 3 0 0 14 - 05 6
2  Spain 3 1 1 1 15 - 06 3
3  South Korea 3 1 1 1 15 - 10 3
4  Australia 3 0 0 3 08 - 31 0
25 March Yugoslavia  7-1
 Australia
25 March Spain  1-1
 South Korea
26 March Spain  11-1
 Australia
26 March Yugoslavia  3-1
 South Korea
27 March South Korea  13-6
 Australia
27 March Yugoslavia  4-3
 Spain

Group 2[edit]

Ironically, the Israeli team that had qualified for the tournament because of the Greek forfeits, had to forfeit its first two games because they used two Russian players who did not have the proper clearance to play.[3]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points
1  Lithuania 3 3 0 0 19 - 02 6
2  Belgium 3 2 0 1 10 - 13 4
3  Bulgaria 3 1 0 2 07 - 06 2
4  Israel 3 0 0 3 00 - 15 0
25 March Bulgaria  5-0
forfeit

 Israel
25 March Lithuania  11-2
 Belgium
26 March Belgium  3-2
 Bulgaria
26 March Lithuania  5-0
forfeit

 Israel
27 March Belgium  5-0
 Israel
27 March Lithuania  3-0
 Bulgaria

Final Round 29-32 Place[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points
29  Lithuania 3 3 0 0 25 - 04 6
30  Yugoslavia 3 2 0 1 10 - 08 4
31  Spain 3 1 0 2 10 - 16 2
32  Belgium 3 0 0 3 05 - 22 0

Host Lithuania won all five games to earn promotion to Group C.

29 March Yugoslavia  5-2
 Belgium
29 March Lithuania  11-1
 Spain
31 March Spain  6-1
 Belgium
31 March Lithuania  3-1
 Yugoslavia

Consolation Round 33-36 Place[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points
33  South Korea 3 2 1 0 22 - 13 5
34  Bulgaria 3 2 0 1 14 - 10 4
35  Israel 3 1 1 1 10 - 10 3
36  Australia 3 0 0 3 12 - 25 0
28 March Bulgaria  5-4
 Australia
28 March Israel  3-3
 South Korea
30 March Israel  7-2
 Australia
30 March South Korea  6-4
 Bulgaria

Ranking and statistics[edit]

 


 1996 IIHF World Championship Winners 

Czech Republic
1st title

Tournament Awards[edit]

Final standings[edit]

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:

Gold medal icon.svg  Czech Republic
Silver medal icon.svg  Canada
Bronze medal icon.svg  United States
4  Russia
5  Finland
6  Sweden
7  Italy
8  Germany
9  Norway
10  Slovakia
11  France
12  Austria

Scoring leaders[edit]

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
Canada Yanic Perreault 8 6 3 9 +4 0 F
Czech Republic Robert Lang 8 5 4 9 +7 2 F
Russia Sergei Berezin 8 4 5 9 +2 2 F
Russia Alexei Yashin 8 4 5 9 +4 4 F
Canada Travis Green 8 5 3 8 +2 8 F
Finland Teemu Selänne 8 5 3 8 +7 0 F
Italy Bruno Zarrillo 6 4 4 8 +4 4 F
Russia Dmitri Kvartalnov 8 4 4 8 0 4 F
Czech Republic Robert Reichel 8 4 4 8 +8 0 F
Czech Republic Pavel Patera 8 3 5 8 +1 2 F

Source: [1]

Leading goaltenders[edit]

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 40% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
Norway Rob Schistad 240 6 1.50 .971 0
Russia Andrei Trefilov 310 6 1.16 .956 0
Czech Republic Roman Turek 480 15 1.88 .952 1
Sweden Boo Ahl 300 10 2.00 .942 1
Germany Klaus Merk 299 16 3.21 .938 1

Source: [2]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Duplacey page 508
  2. ^ Podnieks page 160
  3. ^ a b c d Summary at Passionhockey.com

References[edit]

  • Complete results
  • Duplacey, James (1998). Total Hockey: The official encyclopedia of the National Hockey League. Total Sports. pp. 498–528. ISBN 0-8362-7114-9. 
  • Podnieks, Andrew (2010). IIHF Media Guide & Record Book 2011. Moydart Press. pp. 159–60. 
See also: World Juniors