1996 in the United Kingdom

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1996 in the United Kingdom:
Other years
1994 | 1995 | 1996 (1996) | 1997 | 1998
Individual countries of the United Kingdom
England | Northern Ireland | Scotland | Wales
Sport, Television and music

Events from the year 1996 in the United Kingdom.

Incumbents[edit]

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

  • 13 March – The Dunblane massacre – A gunman kills 16 children, their teacher and himself at a primary school in Dunblane, Stirling. The killer, who wounded 13 other children and another teacher, is quickly identified as 43-year-old former scout leader Thomas Hamilton. It is the worst killing spree in Britain since the Hungerford massacre in August 1987.[8]
  • 20 March – Home Secretary Michael Howard unveils plans to give courts the power to hand down heavier prison sentences, including sending burglars to prison for at least three years after a third offence and all drugs to prison for at least six years. The plans spark controversy, with some critics pointing out that it will increase the prison population by at least 20%.
  • 22 March – The European Union prohibits exports of British beef as a result of the BSE crisis.
  • 29 March – Three British soldiers, all in their twenties, are sentenced to life imprisonment in Cyprus for the abduction, attempted rape and manslaughter of Danish woman Louise Jensen. The three soldiers are Allan Ford from Birmingham, Justin Fowler from Falmouth and Jeffrey Pernell from Oldbury.

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

  • 8 June - The European Football Championships begin in England, with the host nation drawing 1-1 with Switzerland in the opening game.
  • 15 June – A massive IRA bomb explodes in Manchester city centre, devastating the city's retail district.[12]
  • 19 June – The government selects the Greenwich Peninsula site on the banks of the River Thames as the location for the Millennium Dome exhibition which is set to open for the year 2000.
  • 21 June – The latest MORI poll shows the Conservatives on 31%, their best showing for three years, but they are still 21 points behind Labour with just under a year to go before an election has to be held.[1]
  • 26 June - England's hopes of being European champions of football for the first time are ended with a penalty shootout defeat to Germany after a 1-1 draw in the semi-final.
  • 30 June – Germany wins the European Championship final with a 2–1 victory over Czech Republic at Wembley.

July[edit]

August[edit]

  • 14 August – Unemployment has fallen to 2,126,200 – its lowest level in more than five years.
  • 28 August – The Prince and Princess of Wales complete their divorce proceedings after 15 years of marriage. Their separation was first announced nearly four years ago.[11] The former Princess of Wales loses her style of Royal Highness and assumes the style, Diana, Princess of Wales.

September[edit]

  • September
  • 5 September – Matthew Harding, vice-chairman of Chelsea football club, makes a £1million donation to the Labour Party – the largest donation made to the party by any individual.
  • 20 September – 53-year-old jockey Willie Carson is badly injured after being kicked by a horse at Newbury, Berkshire.

October[edit]

  • 12 October – The Conservative government's majority has dwindled to a single seat with the defection of Peter Thurnham to the Liberal Democrats.
  • 13 October – Racing driver Damon Hill wins the Japanese Grand Prix thus clinching the Drivers' World Championship.[11]
  • 14 October - 2 new programmes both on the best-selling toys. (Sky Dancers and Dragon Flyz)
  • 16 October – The Government announces plans to make possession of handguns illegal in the UK, following the Dunblane massacre.[13]
  • 25 October - 11 VCI children's titles - out now on video.

November[edit]

  • 3 November – Barry Porter, Conservative MP for Wirral South, dies of cancer aged 57.[14]
  • 8 November – With the next general election no more than six months away, Labour still look set for a return to power after eighteen years, but the Conservatives have cut their lead to seventeen points in the latest MORI opinion poll – one of the narrowest gaps seen between the two leading parties in any opinion poll over the last three years.[15]
  • 18 November – Channel Tunnel fire – the Channel Tunnel is closed when a truck on a transporter wagon catches fire, disrupting Eurotunnel Shuttle and Eurostar services.
  • 30 November – The Stone of Scone is installed in Edinburgh Castle 700 years after it was removed from Scotland by King Edward I of England.[11]

December[edit]

  • 7 December – Sir John Gorst, 68-year-old Conservative MP for Hendon North in London, announces his resignation, leaving his party without a majority in the House of Commons.
  • 10 December
  • 18 December – Unemployment has fallen below 2,000,000 for the first time in almost six years, four years since it peaked at nearly 3,000,000 in the recession. Despite the strong economic recovery and falling unemployment, the Conservatives are still trailing behind Labour in the opinion polls, a stark contrast to their performance at the last election, where they retained power despite Britain being in recession.

Undated[edit]

  • Lawyer and politician John Taylor is made a Life Peer as Baron Taylor of Warwick,[18] the first black Conservative peer.
  • More than 4% of the UK population (some 2.5million people) now have internet access.

Publications[edit]

Births[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Full date unknown[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Poll tracker: Interactive guide to the opinion polls". BBC News. 29 September 2009. Archived from the original on 17 December 2009. Retrieved 19 December 2009. 
  2. ^ "Passenger train operating companes: who bought what". Railway Magazine: 20. April 1997. 
  3. ^ "1996: First GM food goes on sale in UK". BBC News. 5 February 1996. Archived from the original on 2 February 2008. Retrieved 3 February 2008. 
  4. ^ "1996: Docklands bomb ends IRA ceasefire". BBC News. 10 February 1996. Archived from the original on 1 February 2008. Retrieved 3 February 2008. 
  5. ^ "1996: Arms-to-Iraq report published". BBC News. 15 February 1996. Archived from the original on 18 February 2008. Retrieved 3 February 2008. 
  6. ^ "1996: Bomb blast destroys London bus". BBC News. 18 February 1996. Archived from the original on 21 January 2008. Retrieved 3 February 2008. 
  7. ^ Wolmar, Christian (22 February 1996). "Wrong kind of snow in tunnel...". London: The Independent. Retrieved 21 December 2009. 
  8. ^ "1996: Massacre in Dunblane school gym". BBC News. 13 March 1996. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 3 February 2008. 
  9. ^ "Politics 97". BBC. 1997. Retrieved 19 December 2011. 
  10. ^ "British Election Panel Study, 1992–97". CREST. Retrieved 19 December 2011. 
  11. ^ a b c d Penguin Pocket on This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 0-14-102715-0. 
  12. ^ "1996: Huge explosion rocks central Manchester". BBC News. 15 June 1996. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 3 February 2008. 
  13. ^ "1996: Handguns to be banned in the UK". BBC News. 16 October 1996. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 3 February 2008. 
  14. ^ "Obituary: Barry Porter". The Independent (London). 4 November 1996. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  15. ^ http://www.ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/poll.aspx?oItemId=103
  16. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1996". Retrieved 3 February 2008. 
  17. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1996". Retrieved 3 February 2008. 
  18. ^ "Lord Taylor of Warwick". www.parliament.uk. Retrieved 19 December 2011. 
  19. ^ McKinney, David (10 January 1996). "Obituary: Norrie McCathie". The Independent (London). Retrieved 26 January 2011. 
  20. ^ Shaw, Phil (7 November 1996). "Football: Tommy Lawton dies at age of 77". The Independent (London). Retrieved 1 April 2011. 

See also[edit]