1998–99 Buffalo Sabres season

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1998–99 Buffalo Sabres
Eastern Conference Champions
Division 4th Northeast
Conference 7th Eastern
1998–99 record 37–28–17
Home record 23–12–6
Road record 14–16–11
Goals for 207
Goals against 175
Team information
General Manager Darcy Regier
Coach Lindy Ruff
Captain Michael Peca
Arena HSBC Arena
Team leaders
Goals Miroslav Satan (40)
Assists Jason Woolley (33)
Points Miroslav Satan (66)
Penalties in minutes Rob Ray (261)
Wins Dominik Hasek (30)
Goals against average Dominik Hasek (1.87)
<1997–98

1999–2000 >

The 1998–99 Buffalo Sabres season was the Sabres' 29th season in the National Hockey League. Miroslav Satan scored 40 goals. The Sabres would add centers Stu Barnes from the Pittsburgh Penguins and Joe Juneau from the Washington Capitals. Michal Grosek had the best season of his career, and the team finally returned to the Stanley Cup final, this time in a losing effort against the Dallas Stars.

Offseason[edit]

In the Entry Draft, the Sabres picked Dmitri Kalinin with their first-round pick, 18th overall.

Regular season[edit]

Season standings[edit]

Northeast Division
R CR GP W L T GF GA PIM Pts
1 2 Ottawa Senators 82 44 23 15 239 179 892 103
2 4 Toronto Maple Leafs 82 45 30 7 268 231 1095 97
3 6 Boston Bruins 82 39 30 13 214 181 1182 91
4 7 Buffalo Sabres 82 37 28 17 207 175 1561 91
5 11 Montreal Canadiens 82 32 39 11 184 209 1299 75

[1]

Note: CR = Conference rank; GP = Games played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GF = Goals for; GA = Goals against; Pts = Points
         Bolded teams qualified for the playoffs.

Eastern Conference[2]
R Div GP W L T GF GA Pts
1 y – New Jersey Devils ATL 82 47 24 11 248 196 105
2 y – Ottawa Senators NE 82 44 23 15 239 179 103
3 y – Carolina Hurricanes SE 82 34 30 18 210 202 86
4 Toronto Maple Leafs NE 82 45 30 7 268 231 97
5 Philadelphia Flyers ATL 82 37 26 19 231 196 93
6 Boston Bruins NE 82 39 30 13 214 181 91
7 Buffalo Sabres NE 82 37 28 17 207 175 91
8 Pittsburgh Penguins ATL 82 38 30 14 242 225 90
9 Florida Panthers SE 82 30 34 18 210 228 78
10 New York Rangers ATL 82 33 38 11 217 227 77
11 Montreal Canadiens NE 82 32 39 11 184 209 75
12 Washington Capitals SE 82 31 45 6 200 218 68
13 New York Islanders ATL 82 24 48 10 194 244 58
14 Tampa Bay Lightning SE 82 19 54 9 179 292 47

Divisions: ATL - Atlantic Division, NE - Northeast Division, SE - Southeast Division

bold – Qualified for playoffs; y – Won division


Schedule and results[edit]

No. R Date Score Opponent Record
1 L October 10, 1998 1–4 @ Dallas Stars (1998–99) 0–1–0
2 W October 12, 1998 3–0 @ Colorado Avalanche (1998–99) 1–1–0
3 T October 16, 1998 2–2 OT Florida Panthers (1998–99) 1–1–1
4 W October 17, 1998 4–3 @ Montreal Canadiens (1998–99) 2–1–1
5 L October 23, 1998 0–1 Washington Capitals (1998–99) 2–2–1
6 L October 24, 1998 4–5 @ New York Islanders (1998–99) 2–3–1
7 T October 27, 1998 0–0 OT @ New York Rangers (1998–99) 2–3–2
8 W October 30, 1998 4–1 Toronto Maple Leafs (1998–99) 3–3–2
9 W October 31, 1998 6–3 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1998–99) 4–3–2
10 W November 3, 1998 4–2 Boston Bruins (1998–99) 5–3–2
11 T November 7, 1998 2–2 OT @ Philadelphia Flyers (1998–99) 5–3–3
12 T November 10, 1998 2–2 OT Ottawa Senators (1998–99) 5–3–4
13 W November 12, 1998 2–0 @ Washington Capitals (1998–99) 6–3–4
14 W November 14, 1998 6–1 Chicago Blackhawks (1998–99) 7–3–4
15 W November 20, 1998 4–1 Toronto Maple Leafs (1998–99) 8–3–4
16 L November 21, 1998 1–2 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1998–99) 8–4–4
17 W November 25, 1998 4–2 New York Rangers (1998–99) 9–4–4
18 L November 28, 1998 2–6 @ Florida Panthers (1998–99) 9–5–4
19 W November 29, 1998 6–3 @ Tampa Bay Lightning (1998–99) 10–5–4
20 W December 2, 1998 2–1 Florida Panthers (1998–99) 11–5–4
21 W December 4, 1998 3–0 Philadelphia Flyers (1998–99) 12–5–4
22 W December 5, 1998 3–1 @ Nashville Predators (1998–99) 13–5–4
23 T December 8, 1998 2–2 OT @ St. Louis Blues (1998–99) 13–5–5
24 W December 11, 1998 2–0 New York Rangers (1998–99) 14–5–5
25 W December 12, 1998 4–1 @ Boston Bruins (1998–99) 15–5–5
26 W December 18, 1998 4–2 Montreal Canadiens (1998–99) 16–5–5
27 L December 19, 1998 2–3 Carolina Hurricanes (1998–99) 16–6–5
28 W December 21, 1998 4–1 @ Carolina Hurricanes (1998–99) 17–6–5
29 W December 23, 1998 2–0 Tampa Bay Lightning (1998–99) 18–6–5
30 W December 26, 1998 2–0 @ New Jersey Devils (1998–99) 19–6–5
31 L December 28, 1998 4–7 New Jersey Devils (1998–99) 19–7–5
32 L December 30, 1998 2–3 OT Ottawa Senators (1998–99) 19–8–5
33 L January 1, 1999 2–7 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (1998–99) 19–9–5
34 W January 2, 1999 7–1 Calgary Flames (1998–99) 20–9–5
35 W January 6, 1999 3–2 OT @ Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (1998–99) 21–9–5
36 L January 7, 1999 2–4 @ Los Angeles Kings (1998–99) 21–10–5
37 T January 9, 1999 2–2 OT @ San Jose Sharks (1998–99) 21–10–6
38 L January 11, 1999 0–1 @ Phoenix Coyotes (1998–99) 21–11–6
39 L January 13, 1999 2–4 St. Louis Blues (1998–99) 21–12–6
40 W January 15, 1999 2–1 Boston Bruins (1998–99) 22–12–6
41 T January 16, 1999 1–1 OT @ Ottawa Senators (1998–99) 22–12–7
42 W January 18, 1999 4–0 @ Florida Panthers (1998–99) 23–12–7
43 L January 19, 1999 1–2 @ Tampa Bay Lightning (1998–99) 23–13–7
44 T January 26, 1999 1–1 OT Phoenix Coyotes (1998–99) 23–13–8
45 L January 28, 1999 2–4 Nashville Predators (1998–99) 23–14–8
46 W January 30, 1999 4–1 Los Angeles Kings (1998–99) 24–14–8
47 L February 2, 1999 3–5 @ Pittsburgh Penguins (1998–99) 24–15–8
48 L February 3, 1999 3–5 Colorado Avalanche (1998–99) 24–16–8
49 L February 6, 1999 2–3 @ Montreal Canadiens (1998–99) 24–17–8
50 L February 7, 1999 1–3 @ Washington Capitals (1998–99) 24–18–8
51 T February 9, 1999 1–1 OT @ Ottawa Senators (1998–99) 24–18–9
52 W February 11, 1999 5–2 Montreal Canadiens (1998–99) 25–18–9
53 T February 13, 1999 2–2 OT New York Islanders (1998–99) 25–18–10
54 W February 15, 1999 3–2 Carolina Hurricanes (1998–99) 26–18–10
55 L February 17, 1999 2–3 OT Toronto Maple Leafs (1998–99) 26–19–10
56 W February 19, 1999 4–2 San Jose Sharks (1998–99) 27–19–10
57 T February 21, 1999 4–4 OT Detroit Red Wings (1998–99) 27–19–11
58 T February 24, 1999 2–2 OT @ Calgary Flames (1998–99) 27–19–12
59 L February 26, 1999 3–6 @ Edmonton Oilers (1998–99) 27–20–12
60 W February 28, 1999 2–0 @ Vancouver Canucks (1998–99) 28–20–12
61 L March 3, 1999 3–5 Edmonton Oilers (1998–99) 28–21–12
62 W March 5, 1999 2–1 Dallas Stars (1998–99) 29–21–12
63 T March 7, 1999 1–1 OT Philadelphia Flyers (1998–99) 29–21–13
64 L March 8, 1999 1–4 @ Carolina Hurricanes (1998–99) 29–22–13
65 L March 11, 1999 2–5 Tampa Bay Lightning (1998–99) 29–23–13
66 W March 13, 1999 3–1 Boston Bruins (1998–99) 30–23–13
67 W March 15, 1999 2–1 New York Islanders (1998–99) 31–23–13
68 W March 19, 1999 3–2 OT @ New York Rangers (1998–99) 32–23–13
69 T March 23, 1999 1–1 OT @ New Jersey Devils (1998–99) 32–23–14
70 L March 24, 1999 1–2 @ Detroit Red Wings (1998–99) 32–24–14
71 T March 27, 1999 1–1 OT @ Pittsburgh Penguins (1998–99) 32–24–15
72 W March 28, 1999 4–3 OT Pittsburgh Penguins (1998–99) 33–24–15
73 L March 31, 1999 1–2 @ Chicago Blackhawks (1998–99) 33–25–15
74 L April 3, 1999 1–2 @ Montreal Canadiens (1998–99) 33–26–15
75 W April 5, 1999 3–1 Pittsburgh Penguins (1998–99) 34–26–15
76 W April 6, 1999 4–3 @ New York Islanders (1998–99) 35–26–15
77 W April 9, 1999 3–1 Florida Panthers (1998–99) 36–26–15
78 T April 10, 1999 1–1 OT @ Ottawa Senators (1998–99) 36–26–16
79 T April 13, 1999 2–2 OT @ Philadelphia Flyers (1998–99) 36–26–17
80 L April 14, 1999 1–2 New Jersey Devils (1998–99) 36–27–17
81 L April 17, 1999 1–2 OT @ Boston Bruins (1998–99) 36–28–17
82 W April 18, 1999 3–0 Washington Capitals (1998–99) 37–28–17

Playoffs[edit]

1999 Stanley Cup playoffs

Eastern Conference Quarter-Finals[edit]

Ottawa (2) vs. Buffalo (7)
Date Away Home OT Score
April 21 Buffalo Ottawa 2 – 1
April 23 Buffalo Ottawa 2OT 3 – 2
April 25 Ottawa Buffalo 3 – 0
April 27 Ottawa Buffalo 4 – 3
Buffalo wins series 4–0

Eastern Conference Semi-Finals[edit]

Boston (6) vs. Buffalo (7)
Date Away Home Score
May 6 Buffalo 2 Boston 4 4 – 2
May 9 Buffalo 3 1 Boston 3 – 1
May 12 Boston 2 3 Buffalo 3 – 2
May 14 Boston 0 3 Buffalo 3 – 0
May 16 Buffalo 3 Boston 5 5 – 3
May 18 Boston 2 3 Buffalo 3 – 2
Buffalo wins series 4–2

Eastern Conference Finals[edit]

The Toronto Maple Leafs and Buffalo Sabres met in the 1999 Eastern Conference Finals. The Maple Leafs were coming off a six-game series win over the Pittsburgh Penguins, while the Sabres were coming off a six-game series win themselves, over the Boston Bruins. Toronto was having its best playoff since 1994, when they last made a conference final series. Buffalo, on the other hand, was in the third round for the second consecutive year.

In Game 1 Dwayne Roloson filled in for injured Sabres goaltender Dominik Hasek at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto. Leading 3–2 midway through the game, Toronto appeared to be in control, but Stu Barnes tied the game for Buffalo at 14:37 of the second period. The Sabres went on to score twice in the third period, on goals by Curtis Brown at 5:21 and Geoff Sanderson at 11:02. Steve Thomas' goal with 6:01 remaining in the game brought Toronto to within one, but Buffalo held on to win 5–4. Roloson impressed the critics, stopping 28 of 32 shots.

In game two, the Maple Leafs got two goals 18 seconds apart in the first period, as Steve Sullivan scored at 10:28 followed by Sylvain Cote at 10:46. With just over ten minutes to go in the game, Toronto held a 4–3 lead with Buffalo pressing. Steve Thomas' goal at with 7:43 to go gave the Maple Leafs a 5–3 lead and Garry Valk sealed the 6–3 win with an empty-net goal at 19:30.

With series tied at 1–1, the two teams traveled south to the Marine Midland Arena in Buffalo for games three and four. Dominik Hasek returned for the Sabres in game three, but it was the away team that netted the first goal, as Maple Leafs forward Yanic Perreault scored at 16:08 of the first period. But Buffalo was not to be denied, and they scored three goals in the first 7 minutes and 38 seconds of the second period. Alexander Karpovtsev scored at 13:09 of the second to pull the Maple Leafs to within one, but they could not score the equalizer and Curtis Brown iced the game with an empty-net goal at 19:31 of the third period and the Sabres won, 4–2. Dominik Hasek made 24 saves in the victory.

Buffalo came out flying again in game four, holding a 5–0 lead after two periods. Hasek's shutout bid was erased when Mats Sundin scored on a penalty shot at 6:59. He scored again with 1:57 remaining in the game as Buffalo won, 5–2. This time Hasek made 31 saves.

In game five at the Air Canada Centre on Monday, May 31, the Sabres looked to advance to the Stanley Cup Finals for the first time since 1975. After a scoreless first period, Steve Sullivan got Toronto on the board first just 33 seconds into the second. After goals by Curtis Brown, Kris King and Vaclav Varada, the game was tied 2–2 after two periods. Erik Rasmussen broke the tie with a goal at 11:35 of the third period. With less than two minutes remaining, the Maple Leafs got a power play and pulled Joseph to get a six-on-four situation, could not score on Hasek. Dixon Ward added a shorthanded empty-net net goal with 1:02 remaining as the Sabres went on to win 4–2 and take the series four games to one. With the victory, they advanced to the Stanley Cup Finals for the first time since 1975.

Toronto (4) vs. Buffalo (7)
Date Away Home Score
May 23 Buffalo Toronto 5 – 4
May 25 Buffalo Toronto 6 – 3
May 27 Toronto Buffalo 4 – 2
May 29 Toronto Buffalo 5 – 2
May 31 Buffalo Toronto 4 – 2
Buffalo wins series 4–1 and Prince of Wales Trophy

Stanley Cup Final[edit]

Dallas (1) vs. Buffalo (7)
Date Away Home
June 8 Buffalo 3 2 Dallas OT
June 10 Buffalo 2 4 Dallas
June 12 Dallas 2 1 Buffalo
June 15 Dallas 1 2 Buffalo
June 17 Buffalo 0 2 Dallas
June 19 Dallas 2 1 Buffalo 3OT
Dallas wins series 4—2 and the Stanley Cup
Joe Nieuwendyk (Dallas) wins Conn Smythe Trophy

"No Goal!"[edit]

In the sixth game, Dallas Stars winger Brett Hull's triple-overtime goal — as Hull's skate was visibly in Hasek's crease — ended the series, and the Stars were awarded the Cup. In 1999, it was illegal to score a goal if an offensive player's skate entered the crease before the puck did. At the time, even Dallas Morning News hockey writer Keith Gave questioned the legality of the goal. NHL officials, however, maintained that Hull's two shots in the goal mouth constituted a single possession of the puck since the puck deflected off Hasek, and their ruling stood, citing that they "were going to change the rule the following year anyway." It is widely speculated that, by the time the Sabres mentioned the foul, the red carpet had already been unrolled at center ice, and the officials refused to acknowledge the non-call, also due to Bettman's desires to see a team "South Of the Mason–Dixon line" hoist the Stanley Cup. ESPN's "Page2" staff has ranked the call as the fifth worst officiating call in sports history.[3] Conversely, Al Strachan of the Toronto Sun wrote "There should have been no controversy whatsoever. When Hull first kicked the rebound on to his stick, he had neither foot in the crease. At the instant he kicked the puck, he became in control of it. It was only in the follow-through of that kick that his left foot moved into the crease."[4] Buffalo sports fans, who have suffered through some of the biggest misfortunes in sports history (such as "Wide Right" and "Music City Miracle"), refer to the game as "No Goal", a phrase still used in western New York to this day, even having bumper stickers saying the phrase. The rule was changed for the following season, allowing players to be inside the goaltender's crease as long as they do not interfere with the goalie.

Player statistics[edit]

Forwards[edit]

Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; PIM = Penalty minutes

Player GP G A Pts PIM
Miroslav Satan 81 40 26 66 44
Michael Peca 82 27 29 56 81
Michal Grosek 76 20 30 50 102
Curtis Brown 78 16 31 47 56
Dixon Ward 78 20 24 44 44
Brian Holzinger 81 17 17 34 45
Vaclav Varada 72 7 24 31 61
Geoff Sanderson 75 12 18 30 22
Matthew Barnaby* 44 4 14 18 143
Derek Plante* 41 4 11 15 12
Wayne Primeau 67 5 8 13 38
Erik Rasmussen 42 3 7 10 37
Rob Ray 76 0 4 4 261
Stu Barnes* 17 0 4 4 10
Randy Cunneyworth 14 2 2 4 0
Paul Kruse 43 3 0 3 114
Joe Juneau* 9 1 1 2 2
Dean Sylvester 1 0 0 0 0
Domenic Pittis 3 0 0 0 2

* - player was traded during season; stats only include games played with Buffalo

Defensemen[edit]

Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; PIM = Penalty minutes

Player GP G A Pts PIM
Jason Woolley 80 10 33 43 62
Alexei Zhitnik 81 7 26 33 96
Darryl Shannon 71 3 12 15 52
Richard Smehlik 72 3 11 14 44
James Patrick 45 1 7 8 16
Jay McKee 72 0 6 6 75
Mike Wilson* 30 1 2 3 47
Rhett Warrener* 13 1 0 1 20
Jean-Luc Grand-Pierre 16 0 1 1 17
Mike Hurlbut 1 0 0 0 0
Jason Holland 3 0 0 0 8
Cory Sarich 4 0 0 0 0
Rumun Ndur* 8 0 0 0 16

* - player was traded during season; stats only include games played with Buffalo

Goaltending[edit]

Note: GP = Games played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts; GAA = Goals against average

Player GP W L T SO GAA
Dominik Hasek 64 30 18 14 9 1.87
Dwayne Roloson 18 6 8 2 1 2.77
Martin Biron 6 1 2 1 0 2.14

Awards and records[edit]

NHL All-Star Game

  • Dominik Hasek, World Team

Transactions[edit]

Draft picks[edit]

Round # Player Nationality College/Junior/Club Team
1 18 Dmitri Kalinin (D)  Russia Traktor Chelyabinsk (Russia)
2 34 Andrew Peters (LW)  Canada Oshawa Generals (OHL)
2 50 Jaroslav Kristek (RW)  Czech Republic HC Zlín (Extraliga)
3 77 Mike Pandolfo (RW)  United States St. Sebastian's (USHS)
5 137 Aaron Goldade (LW)  Canada Brandon Wheat Kings (WHL)
6 164 Ales Kotalik (RW)  Czech Republic HC České Budějovice
7 191 Brad Moran (LW)  Canada Calgary Hitmen (WHL)
8 218 David Moravec (LW)  Czech Republic -
9 249 Edo Terglav (RW)  Czech Republic Baie-Comeau Drakkar (QMJHL)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 155.
  2. ^ "1998-1999 Conference Standings Standings - NHL.com - Standings". NHL. 
  3. ^ ESPN.com - Page2, Worst Calls In Sports History
  4. ^ About.com "No Goal" Explanation
  5. ^ National Hockey League Official Guide and Record Book 2006, p. 237, Dan Diamond & Associates, Toronto, Ontario, ISBN 0-920445-98-5