1998–99 FA Premier League

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Premier League
Season 1998–99
Champions Manchester United
5th Premier League title
12th English title
Promoted Charlton Athletic
Nottingham Forest
Middlesbrough
Relegated Charlton Athletic
Nottingham Forest
Blackburn Rovers
Champions League Manchester United (first group stage)
Arsenal (first group stage)
Chelsea (third qualifying round)
UEFA Cup Leeds United (first round)
Newcastle United (first round)
Tottenham Hotspur (first round)
Intertoto Cup West Ham United (third round)
Matches played 380
Goals scored 963 (2.53 per match)
Top goalscorer Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink (Leeds, 18)
Michael Owen (Liverpool, 18)
Dwight Yorke (Manchester United, 18)
Biggest home win Liverpool 7–1 Southampton (16 January 1999)
Everton 6–0 West Ham United (8 May 1999)
Biggest away win Nottingham Forest 1–8 Manchester United (6 February 1999)
Highest scoring Nottingham Forest 1–8 Manchester United (6 February 1999)
Longest winning run Leeds United (7)
Longest unbeaten run Chelsea (21)
Longest losing run Charlton Athletic (8)
Highest attendance Manchester United vs Southampton (55,316) (27 February 1999)
Lowest attendance Nottingham Forest vs Sheffield Wednesday (20,480) (1 May 1999)
Average attendance 30,591

The 1998–99 FA Premier League season was the seventh season of the Premier League, the top division of English football, since its establishment in 1992. The season will always be remembered as the one in which Manchester United won a unique treble of the league title, the FA Cup and the European Cup. They secured their fifth league championship in seven seasons after losing just three league games all season.

Arsenal, who failed to regain their title, despite having the same points tally as last season 78 points, and had at one point looked as though they were on the brink of winning the title, after beating fellow rivals Tottenham Hotspur, while Manchester United had drawn against Liverpool, 2–2. However, Manchester United pushed on and took advantage of Arsenal's 1–0 defeat at Leeds United in the penultimate match of the season and despite going 1–0 down against Tottenham on the final day, came back to win 2–1 and clinch the title. Should they have failed to win, Arsenal would have been crowned champions once more.

To achieve their success, the Manchester United playing squad had been altered substantially during the close season. A total of more than £28 million had been spent on Dwight Yorke, Jaap Stam and Jesper Blomqvist, while several older players left the club; Gary Pallister returned to Middlesbrough after nine years for £2.5 million, while Brian McClair returned to Motherwell on a free transfer. In December, however, McClair was back in the Premier League as Brian Kidd's assistant at Blackburn Rovers.

European qualifiers[edit]

At the end of 1998–99, the Premiership would have three Champions League places. As well as Manchester United, runners-up Arsenal and third placed Chelsea would be playing in the following season's Champions League. There would only be one automatic UEFA Cup place from the league – taken by fourth-placed Leeds United. Fifth-placed West Ham United qualified for the UEFA Cup via the Intertoto Cup. Also qualifying were Newcastle United via the FA Cup final, and Tottenham Hotspur via the League Cup.

Relegation Battle[edit]

Bottom of the Premiership in the final table came Nottingham Forest, who suffered their third relegation in seven seasons. One notable low for Forest this season was an 8–1 drubbing at home, by Manchester United. Second from bottom came Blackburn Rovers, who just four seasons earlier had been Premiership champions. The final relegation place went to Charlton Athletic, who went down at the end of their first spell in the top flight for nine seasons. The only newly promoted club to survive was Middlesbrough, who finished in a respectable ninth place.

None of the teams relegated from the Premiership the previous season regained their top division status in 1999, although First Division champions Sunderland regained their Premiership place after a two-year exile. The other two relegation places went to long-term absentees from the top division. Playoff winners Watford regained their top division place after an absence of 11 years, but runners-up Bradford had been outside of the top division for 77 years. These two promotion winners surprised the observers more than any other Division One side during 1998–99.

Personnel and kits[edit]

(as of 16 May 1999)

Team Manager Captain Kit manufacturer Shirt sponsor
Arsenal France Arsène Wenger England Tony Adams Nike JVC
Aston Villa England John Gregory England Gareth Southgate Reebok LDV Vans
Blackburn Rovers England Brian Kidd England Garry Flitcroft Uhlsport CIS
Charlton Athletic England Alan Curbishley Republic of Ireland Mark Kinsella Le Coq Sportif Mesh Computers
Chelsea Italy Gianluca Vialli England Dennis Wise Umbro Autoglass
Coventry City Scotland Gordon Strachan Scotland Gary McAllister Le Coq Sportif Subaru
Derby County England Jim Smith Croatia Igor Štimac Puma EDS
Everton Scotland Walter Smith England Dave Watson Umbro One2One
Leeds United Republic of Ireland David O'Leary South Africa Lucas Radebe Puma Packard Bell
Leicester City Northern Ireland Martin O'Neill England Steve Walsh Fox Leisure Walkers
Liverpool France Gérard Houllier England Paul Ince Reebok Carlsberg
Manchester United Scotland Alex Ferguson Republic of Ireland Roy Keane Umbro Sharp
Middlesbrough England Bryan Robson Republic of Ireland Andy Townsend Erreà Cellnet
Newcastle United Netherlands Ruud Gullit England Alan Shearer Adidas Newcastle Brown Ale
Nottingham Forest England Ron Atkinson (caretaker) England Steve Chettle Umbro Pinnacle Insurance
Sheffield Wednesday Northern Ireland Danny Wilson England Peter Atherton Puma Sanderson
Southampton England Dave Jones England Matt Le Tissier Pony Sanderson
Tottenham Hotspur Scotland George Graham England Sol Campbell Pony Hewlett-Packard
West Ham United England Harry Redknapp Northern Ireland Steve Lomas Pony Dr. Martens
Wimbledon England Terry Burton
England Mick Harford (caretakers)
Jamaica Robbie Earle Lotto Elonex

Managerial changes[edit]

Liverpool brought in former French national coach Gérard Houllier to work alongside manager Roy Evans at the start of the season, but Evans resigned in November to leave Houllier in sole charge.

Tottenham Hotspur sacked Christian Gross in September after less than a year in charge. His replacement was George Graham of Leeds United, who was himself replaced by former assistant David O'Leary.

Newcastle United sacked Kenny Dalglish just after the start of the season and replaced him with Ruud Gullit.

Everton appointed Walter Smith as Howard Kendall's successor.

Blackburn Rovers sacked Roy Hodgson in November, with the club bottom of the table. Manchester United assistant Brian Kidd replaced him. Ironically relegation was confirmed in the penultimate game of the season against Kidd's former club.

Nottingham Forest sacked Dave Bassett in January and put Ron Atkinson in charge until the end of the season. Atkinson retired after failing to save Forest from relegation and former England captain David Platt, 33, was named as player-manager.

Wimbledon manager Joe Kinnear was effectively forced to step down due to health problems in March, and did not return to the club. Coaches Mick Harford and Terry Burton took charge until the end of the season, when Norwegian coach Egil Olsen was appointed manager.

Final league table[edit]

Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1 Manchester United (C) 38 22 13 3 80 37 +43 79 1999–2000 UEFA Champions League Group stage
2 Arsenal 38 22 12 4 59 17 +42 78
3 Chelsea 38 20 15 3 57 30 +27 75 1999–2000 UEFA Champions League Third qualifying round
4 Leeds United 38 18 13 7 62 34 +28 67 1999–2000 UEFA Cup First round
5 West Ham United 38 16 9 13 46 53 −7 57 1999 UEFA Intertoto Cup Third round
6 Aston Villa 38 15 10 13 51 46 +5 55
7 Liverpool 38 15 9 14 68 49 +19 54
8 Derby County 38 13 13 12 40 45 −5 52
9 Middlesbrough 38 12 15 11 48 54 −6 51
10 Leicester City 38 12 13 13 40 46 −6 49
11 Tottenham Hotspur 38 11 14 13 47 50 −3 47 1999–2000 UEFA Cup First round 1
12 Sheffield Wednesday 38 13 7 18 41 42 −1 46
13 Newcastle United 38 11 13 14 48 54 −6 46 1999–2000 UEFA Cup First round 2
14 Everton 38 11 10 17 42 47 −5 43
15 Coventry City 38 11 9 18 39 51 −12 42
16 Wimbledon 38 10 12 16 40 63 −23 42
17 Southampton 38 11 8 19 37 64 −27 41
18 Charlton Athletic (R) 38 8 12 18 41 56 −15 36 Relegation to 1999–2000 Football League First Division
19 Blackburn Rovers (R) 38 7 14 17 38 52 −14 35
20 Nottingham Forest (R) 38 7 9 22 35 69 −34 30

Source:[citation needed]
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored
1 Tottenham Hotspur qualified for the UEFA Cup as League Cup winners.
2 As Manchester United qualified for the Champions League, their UEFA Cup place as FA Cup winners defaulted to Newcastle United, the losing finalists.
(C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (E) = Eliminated; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round.
Only applicable when the season is not finished:
(Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular phase indicated; (RQ) = Qualified to the relegation tournament indicated; (DQ) = Disqualified from tournament.

Season statistics[edit]

Total goals: 963
Average goals per game: 2.53

Results[edit]

Home \ Away[1] ARS AST BLB CHA CHE COV DER EVE LEE LEI LIV MNU MID NEW NOT SHW SOT TOT WHU WDN
Arsenal 1–0 1–0 0–0 1–0 2–0 1–0 1–0 3–1 5–0 0–0 3–0 1–1 3–0 2–1 3–0 1–1 0–0 1–0 5–1
Aston Villa 3–2 1–3 3–4 0–3 1–4 1–0 3–0 1–2 1–1 2–4 1–1 3–1 1–0 2–0 2–1 3–0 3–2 0–0 2–0
Blackburn Rovers 1–2 2–1 1–0 3–4 1–2 0–0 1–2 1–0 1–0 1–3 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–2 1–4 0–2 1–1 3–0 3–1
Charlton Athletic 0–1 0–1 0–0 0–1 1–1 1–2 1–2 1–1 0–0 1–0 0–1 1–1 2–2 0–0 0–1 5–0 1–4 4–2 2–0
Chelsea 0–0 2–1 1–1 2–1 2–1 2–1 3–1 1–0 2–2 2–1 0–0 2–0 1–1 2–1 1–1 1–0 2–0 0–1 3–0
Coventry City 0–1 1–2 1–1 2–1 2–1 1–1 3–0 2–2 1–1 2–1 0–1 1–2 1–5 4–0 1–0 1–0 1–1 0–0 2–1
Derby County 0–0 2–1 1–0 0–2 2–2 0–0 2–1 2–2 2–0 3–2 1–1 2–1 3–4 1–0 1–0 0–0 0–1 0–2 0–0
Everton 0–2 0–0 0–0 4–1 0–0 2–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–4 5–0 1–0 0–1 1–2 1–0 0–1 6–0 1–1
Leeds United 1–0 0–0 1–0 4–1 0–0 2–0 4–1 1–0 0–1 0–0 1–1 2–0 0–1 3–1 2–1 3–0 2–0 4–0 2–2
Leicester City 1–1 2–2 1–1 1–1 2–4 1–0 1–2 2–0 1–2 1–0 2–6 0–1 2–0 3–1 0–2 2–0 2–1 0–0 1–1
Liverpool 0–0 0–1 2–0 3–3 1–1 2–0 1–2 3–2 1–3 0–1 2–2 3–1 4–2 5–1 2–0 7–1 3–2 2–2 3–0
Manchester United 1–1 2–1 3–2 4–1 1–1 2–0 1–0 3–1 3–2 2–2 2–0 2–3 0–0 3–0 3–0 2–1 2–1 4–1 5–1
Middlesbrough 1–6 0–0 2–1 2–0 0–0 2–0 1–1 2–2 0–0 0–0 1–3 0–1 2–2 1–1 4–0 3–0 0–0 1–0 3–1
Newcastle United 1–1 2–1 1–1 0–0 0–1 4–1 2–1 1–3 0–3 1–0 1–4 1–2 1–1 2–0 1–1 4–0 1–1 0–3 3–1
Nottingham Forest 0–1 2–2 2–2 0–1 1–3 1–0 2–2 0–2 1–1 1–0 2–2 1–8 1–2 1–2 2–0 1–1 0–1 0–0 0–1
Sheffield Wednesday 1–0 0–1 3–0 3–0 0–0 1–2 0–1 0–0 0–2 0–1 1–0 3–1 3–1 1–1 3–2 0–0 0–0 0–1 1–2
Southampton 0–0 1–4 3–3 3–1 0–2 2–1 0–1 2–0 3–0 2–1 1–2 0–3 3–3 2–1 1–2 1–0 1–1 1–0 3–1
Tottenham Hotspur 1–3 1–0 2–1 2–2 2–2 0–0 1–1 4–1 3–3 0–2 2–1 2–2 0–3 2–0 2–0 0–3 3–0 1–2 0–0
West Ham United 0–4 0–0 2–0 0–1 1–1 2–0 5–1 2–1 1–5 3–2 2–1 0–0 4–0 2–0 2–1 0–4 1–0 2–1 3–4
Wimbledon 1–0 0–0 1–1 2–1 1–2 2–1 2–1 1–2 1–1 0–1 1–0 1–1 2–2 1–1 1–3 2–1 0–2 3–1 0–0

Source:[citation needed]
^ The home team is listed in the left-hand column.
Colours: Purple = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Top scorers[edit]

Rank Scorer Club Goals
1 Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink Leeds United 18
Michael Owen Liverpool 18
Dwight Yorke Manchester United 18
4 Nicolas Anelka Arsenal 17
Andy Cole Manchester United 17
6 Hamilton Ricard Middlesbrough 15
7 Dion Dublin Aston Villa 14
Robbie Fowler Liverpool 14
Julian Joachim Aston Villa 14
Alan Shearer Newcastle United 14

Awards[edit]

Monthly awards[edit]

Month Manager of the Month Player of the Month
August Alan Curbishley (Charlton Athletic) Michael Owen (Liverpool)
September John Gregory (Aston Villa) Alan Shearer (Newcastle United)
October Martin O'Neill (Leicester City) Roy Keane (Manchester United)
November Harry Redknapp (West Ham United) Dion Dublin (Aston Villa)
December George Graham (Tottenham Hotspur) David Ginola (Tottenham Hotspur)
January Alex Ferguson (Manchester United) Dwight Yorke (Manchester United)
February Alan Curbishley (Charlton Athletic) Nicolas Anelka (Arsenal)
March David O'Leary (Leeds United) Ray Parlour (Arsenal)
April Alex Ferguson (Manchester United) Kevin Campbell (Everton)

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]