1999 in paleontology

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   In science: 1996 1997 1998 -1999- 2000 2001 2002     
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Paleontology, palaeontology or palæontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils.[1] This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because mankind has encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred in the year 1999.

Arthropods[edit]

Insects[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Neoephemera antiqua[2]

sp. nov

valid

Ypresian

Klondike Mountain Formation

 USA

Oldest neoephemerid mayfly species described

Pachycondyla rebekkae[3][4]

sp. nov

valid

  • Rust & Andersen

Ypresian

Fur Formation

 Denmark

moved by Archibald, Cover, & Moreau to Ypresiomyrma

Pachycondyla rebekkae

Mollusca[edit]

Newly named bivalves[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Concavodonta ovalis[5]

sp nov

Valid

Sánchez

Caradoc

Don Braulio Formation

 Argentina

third species in the genus

Concavodontinae[5]

subfam nov

Valid

Sánchez

Ordovician

one of two Subfamilies in Praenuculidae

Cuyopsis[5]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Sánchez

Caradoc

Don Braulio Formation

 Argentina

Monotypic with the species C. symmetricus

Emiliania[5]

Gen et sp nov

homonym

Sánchez

Caradoc

Don Braulio Formation

 Argentina

genus name preoccupied by Emiliania Hay & Mohler, 1967, renamed to Emiliodonta

Hemiconcavodonta[5]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Sánchez

Caradoc

Don Braulio Formation

 Argentina

third genus in the subfamily Concavodontinae

Praenuculinae[5]

subfam nov

Valid

Sánchez

Ordovician

one of two Subfamilies in Praenuculidae

Similodonta ceryx[6]

Sp nov

Valid

Cope

Middle Ordovician

Gilfach Farm No. 1 Borehole

 Wales

oldest species in the genus Similodonta

Trigonoconcha[5]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Sánchez

Caradoc

Don Braulio Formation

 Argentina

Monotypic with the species T. acuta

Villicumia[5]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Sánchez

Caradoc

Don Braulio Formation

 Argentina

Monotypic with the species V. canteraensis

Fish[edit]

Newly named Actinopterygii ("Ray-finned Fish")[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Nardovelifer[7]

gen et sp nov

Valid

C. Sorbini & L. Sorbini

Campanian

Nardo

 Italy

Archosauromorphs[edit]

  • Ornithomimid gastroliths documented.[8]

Newly named dinosauriforms[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Eucoelophysis[9]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Sullivan & Lucas

Norian

Chinle Formation, New Mexico

 USA

Sister genus to the Dinosaurs; first identified as a relative of coelophysid.

Newly named dinosaurs[edit]

Data courtesy of George Olshevsky's dinosaur genera list[10] and Dr. Jeremy Montague's dinosaur genus database.[11]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Achillobator[12]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Perle, Norell, & Clark

Late Cretaceous

Bayan Shireh Formation

 Mongolia

A large dromaeosaurid.

Agustinia[13]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Bonaparte

Albian

Lohan Cura Formation

 Argentina

An armored sauropod

"Airakoraptor"[12]

gen nov

Nomen nudum

Perle, Norell, & Clark

 Mongolia

A possible dromaeosaurid that has yet to be fully described.

Animantarx[14]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Carpenter, Kirkland, Burge, & Bird

Late Cretaceous

Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

 USA

Nodosaur whose name means "living citadel."

"Archaeoraptor"[15]

Hoax

Stephen Czerkas vide:C. P. Sloan vide:Olson

Chimera of Yanornis and Microraptor.

Atlasaurus[16]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Monbaron, Russell, & Taquet

Middle Jurassic

Tiougguit Formation

 Morocco

A primitive sauropod

Beipiaosaurus[17]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Xu, Tang, & Wang

Early Cretaceous

Yixian Formation

 China

A therizinosaur

"Bilbeyhallorum"[18]

Nomen nudum

Burge, Bird, McClelland, & Cicconetti

Aptian

Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

 USA

informal name for Cedarpelta.

Cedarosaurus[19]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Tidwell, Carpenter, & Brooks

Barremian

Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

 USA

A sauropod.

Chaoyangsaurus[20]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Zhao, Cheng, & Xu

Late Jurassic

Tuchengzi Formation

 China

An extremely primitive ceratopsian

Dinheirosaurus[21]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Kimmeridgian

Alcobaça Formation

 Portugal

A diplodocid.

"Eugongbusaurus"[22]

gen nov

Nomen nudum

Knoll

Late Jurassic

Shishugou Formation

 China

A ?hypsilophodont that hasn't yet been formally named.

Gondwanatitan[23]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Kellner & Azevedo

Late Cretaceous

Adamantina Formation

 Brazil

A titanosaur

Guaibasaurus[24]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Bonaparte, Ferigolo, & Ribeiro

Late Triassic

Caturrita Formation

 Brazil

A sauropodomorph.

Jobaria[25]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Sereno, et al

Middle Jurassic

Tiourarén Formation

 Niger

A eusauropod

Lessemsaurus[26]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Bonaparte

Late Triassic

Los Colorados Formation

 Argentina

A primitive sauropodomorph

Lirainosaurus[27]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Sanz et al

Late Cretaceous

Vitoria Formation

 Spain

A titanosaurid.

Lurdusaurus[28]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Taquet & Russell

Aptian

Elrhaz Formation

 Niger\

A hadrosaur

"Newtonsaurus"[29]

gen et sp nov

Nomen nudum

Welles vide: Welles & Pickering

Late Triassic

Rhaetic beds

 Wales

Informal name

Nigersaurus[25]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Early Cretaceous

Elrhaz Formation

 Niger

A rebbachisaurid

Nodocephalosaurus[30]

gen et sp nov

Valid taxon

  • Sullivan

Campanian

Kirtland Formation

 USA

An anklyosaurid

Proyandusaurus[22]

gen nov

synonym

Knoll

Bajocian

Shaximiao Formation

 China

informal name for Hexinlusaurus

Qantassaurus[31]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Rich & Vickers-Rich

Early Cretaceous

Wonthaggi Formation

 Australia

A possible hypsilophodontid

Santanaraptor[32]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Kellner

Cenomanian

Santana Formation

 Brazil

A theropod

Saturnalia[33]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Langer, Abdala, Richter, & Benton

Carnian

Santa Maria Formation

 Brazil

A basal sauropodomorph

Sinornithosaurus[34]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Xu, Wang, & Wu

Aptian

Yixian Formation

 China

A Dromaeosaurid

Tangvayosaurus[35]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Allain et at

Early Cretaceous

Grès Supérior Formation

 Laos

A titanosaur

Tehuelchesaurus[36]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Rich et al

Middle Jurassic

Cañadon Asfalto Formation

 Argentina

A eusauropod

Newly named Pterosaurs[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Dendrorhynchoides[37]

gen nov

Valid

Ji S.-A., Ji Q., & Padian

Aptian

Yixian Formation

 China

A new genus for "Dendrorhynchus" curvidentatus (Ji & Ji, 1998)

Siroccopteryx

gen et sp nov

junior synonym?

Mader & Kellner

Cenomanian

Kem Kem Formation

 Morocco

possibly a jr synonym of Coloborhynchus?

Tendaguripterus[38]

gen et sp nov

Valid

Unwin & Heinrich

Kimmeridgian

Tendaguru Formation

 Tanzania

Monotypic with the species T. recki

Lepidosauromorphs[edit]

Newly named Plesiosaurs[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Callawayasaurus[39]

gen nov

Valid

Carpenter

Aptian

Paja Formation

 Colombia

New genus for the species "Alzadasaurus" colombiensis Wells, 1962

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gini-Newman, Garfield; Graham, Elizabeth (2001). Echoes from the past: world history to the 16th century. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. ISBN 9780070887398. OCLC 46769716. 
  2. ^ Sinitchenkova, N. D. (1999). "A new mayfly species of the extant genus Neoephemera from the Eocene of North America (Insecta: Ephemerida=Ephemeroptera)". Paleontological Journal 33 (4): 403–405. 
  3. ^ Rust, J.; Andersen, N. M. (1999). "Giant ants from the Paleogene of Denmark with a discussion of the fossil history and early evolution of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 125: 331–348. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1999.tb00596.x. 
  4. ^ Archibald, S.B.; Cover, S. P.; Moreau, C. S. (2006). "Bulldog Ants of the Eocene Okanagan Highlands and History of the Subfamily (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Myrmeciinae)". Annals of the Entomological Society of America 99 (3): 487–523. doi:10.1603/0013-8746(2006)99[487:BAOTEO]2.0.CO;2. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Sánchez, T.M. (1999). "New Late Ordovician (Early Caradoc) Bivalves from the Sierra de Villicum (Argentine Precordillera)". Journal of Paleontology 73 (1): 66–76. JSTOR 1306745. 
  6. ^ Cope, J.C.W. (1999). "Middle Ordovician bivalves from Mid-Wales and the Welsh Borderland". Palaeontology 42 (3): 467–499. doi:10.1111/1475-4983.00081. 
  7. ^ C. Sorbini & L. Sorbini (1999). "The Cretaceous fishes of Nardo. 10: Nardovelifer altipinnis, gen. et sp. nov. (Teleostei, Lampridiformes, Veliferidae)". St Ric Giac Terz Bolca 8: 11–27. 
  8. ^ Kobayashi et al. (1999). Sanders, Manley, and Carpenter (2001), "Table 12.1" page 167.
  9. ^ Sullivan, R.M. and S.G. Lucas. 1999. Eucoelophysis baldwini, a new theropod dinosaur from the Upper Triassic of New Mexico, and the status of the original types of Coelophysis. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 19 (1): pp. 81-90.
  10. ^ Olshevsky, George. "Dinogeorge's Dinosaur Genera List". Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  11. ^ Montague, Jeremy. "Dr. Montague's Database". Retrieved 2008-10-29. 
  12. ^ a b Perle, A., M. Norell and J. Clark. 1999. A new maniraptoran theropod Achillobator giganticus (Dromaeosauridae) from the Upper Cretaceous of Burkhant, Mongolia. Contributions of the Department of Geology, National University Mongolia (35 pages).
  13. ^ Bonaparte, J.F. 1999. An armored sauropod from the Aptian of Northern Patagonia, Argentina. Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium (15 October). National Science Museum Monographs 15 (Y. Tomida, T.H. Rich and P. Vickers-Rich, eds.), Tokyo (296 pages + append.).
  14. ^ Carpenter, K., K. Kirkland, D. Burge, and J. Bird. 1999. Ankylosaurs (Dinosauria; Ornithischia) of the Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, and the stratigraphic distributions. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah (D. Gillete, ed.). Utah Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publication 99-1.
  15. ^ Czerkas vide Sloan, C.P. 1999. Feathers for T. rex? National Geographic 196 (5 - November): pp. 98-107. vide Olson, 2000.
  16. ^ Monbaron, M., D.A. Russell, and P. Taquet. 1999. Atlasaurus imelakeii n.g., n.sp., a brachiosaurid-like sauropod from the Middle Jurassic of Morocco. Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences. Science de la Terre and des Planetes. 329: pp. 519-526.
  17. ^ Xu, X. Z.-L. Tang, and X.-L Wang. 1999. A therizinosauroid dinosaur with integumentary structures from China. Nature 399: pp. 350-354.
  18. ^ Burge, D.L., J.H. Bird, B.K. McClelland, and M.A. Cicconetti. 1999. Comparison of four armored dinosaurs from the Cedar Mountain Formation of Eastern Utah. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Abstracts of Papers, 59th Annual Meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Denver, CO, Volume 19, Supplement to n. 3, p. 34A.
  19. ^ Tidwell, V., K. Carpenter, and W. Brooks. 1999. New sauropod from the Lower Cretaceous of Utah, USA. Oryctos 2: pp. 21-37.
  20. ^ Zhao X, Zh. Cheng, and X. Xu. 1999. The earliest ceratopsian from the Tuchengzi Formation of Liaoning, China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 19 (4): pp. 681-691.
  21. ^ Bonaparte, J.F. and O. Mateus. 1999. A new diplodocid, Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis gen. et sp. nov., from the Late Jurassic beds of Portugal. Revista del Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales 5 (2): pp. 13-29.
  22. ^ a b Knoll, F. 1999. The family Fabrosauridae. In: IV European Workshop on Vertebrate Palaeontology: p. 65;
  23. ^ Kellner, A.W.A. and S.A.K. de Azevedo. 1999. A new sauropod dinosaur (Titanosauria) from the Late Cretaceous of Brazil. In: Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium (Y. Tomida, T.H. Rich, and P. Vickers-Rich, eds.): pp. 111-142.
  24. ^ Bonaparte, J.F., J. Ferigolo, and A.M. Ribeiro. 1999. A new early Late Triassic saurischian dinosaur from Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. In: Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium (Y. Tomida, T.H. Rich, and P. Vickers-Rich, eds.): pp. 89-109.
  25. ^ a b Sereno, P.C, L. Allison, D.B. Beck, H.C.E. Dutheil, G.H. Larsson, B.M. Lyon, W. Rudyard, C. Sadleir, C. A. Sidor, D.J. Varricchio, G.P. Wilson, and J.A. Wilson. 1999. Cretaceous sauropods from the Sahara and the uneven rate of skeletal evolution among dinosaurs. Science 286: pp. 1342-1347.
  26. ^ Bonaparte, J.F. 1999. Evolución de las vértebras presacras en Sauropodomorpha. Ameghiniana 36 (2): pp. 115-187.
  27. ^ Sanz, J.L., J.E. Powell, J. Le Loueff, R. Martinez, and X. Pereda-Suberbiola. 1999. Sauropod remains from the Upper Cretaceous of Lan~o (Northcentral Spain). Titanosaur phylogenetic relationships. Est. Mus. Cienc. Nat. de Alava 14 (Num. Espec. 1): pp. 235-255.
  28. ^ Taquet, P. D.A. Russell. 1999. A massively constructed iguandont from Gadoufaouna, Lower Cretaceous of Niger. Annales de Paleontologie 85 (1): pp. 85-96.
  29. ^ Pickering, S. 1995. A fractal scaling in dinosaurology project (2nd revised printing). Capitola, California: 478 pages; [nomen nudum]; DinoData places in Zaclodon (and in Megalosaurus).
  30. ^ Sullivan, R.M. 1999. Nodocephalosaurus kirtlandensis, gen. et sp. nov., a new ankylosaurid dinosaur (Ornithischia: Ankylosauria) from the Upper Cretaceous Kirtland Formation (upper Campanian), San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 19 (1): pp. 126-139.
  31. ^ Rich, T. H. and P. Vickers-Rich. 1999. The Hypsilophodontidae from southeastern Australia. In: Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium (Y. Tomida, T.H. Rich, and P. Vickers-Rich, eds.): pp. 167-180.
  32. ^ Kellner, A.W.A. 1999. Short note on a new dinosaur (Theropoda, Coelurosauria) from the Santana Formation (Romualdo Member, Albian), Northeastern Brazil. Boletim do Museu Nacional (Rio de Janeiro, Brasil), N.S. 9: 8 pages.
  33. ^ Langer, M.C., F. Abdala, M. Richter, and M.J. Benton. 1999. A sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Upper Triassic (Carnian) of southern Brazil. Compte rendu hebdomadaire des seances de l’Academie des Sciences Paris, Sciences de la Terre et des Planetes 329 : pp. 511-517.
  34. ^ Xu, X., X.-L. Wang, and X.-C. Wu. 1999. A dromaeosaurid dinosaur with a filamentous integument from the Yixian Formation of China. Nature 401: pp. 262-266.
  35. ^ Allain, R., P. Taquet, B. Battail, J. Dejax, P. Richir, M. Veran, F.Limon-Duparcmeur, R. Vacant, O. Mateus, P. Sayarath, B. Khenthavong, and S. Phouyavong. 1999. Un nouveau genre de dinosaure sauropode de la formation des Gres superieurs (Aptien-Albien) du Laos. C.R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Sciences de la Terre et des Planetes 329: pp. 609-616.
  36. ^ Rich, T.H., P. Vickers-Rich, O. Gimenez, R. Cúneo, P. Puerta, and P. Vacca. 1999. A new sauropod dinosaur from Chubut Province, Argentina. In: Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium (Y. Tomida, T.H. Rich, and P. Vickers-Rich, eds.): pp. 61-84.
  37. ^ Ji, S.-A., Ji, Q., and Padian, K. (1999). Biostratigraphy of new pterosaurs from China. Nature 398:573–574.
  38. ^ Unwin, David M.; and Heinrich, Wolf-Dieter (1999). "On a pterosaur jaw from the Upper Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania)". Mitteilungen aus dem Museum Für Naturkunde in Berlin Geowissenschaftliche Reihe 2: 121–134. 
  39. ^ Carpenter, K. 1999. "Revision of North American elasmosaurs from the Cretaceous of the Western Interior". Paludicola 2(2):148-173.
  • Kobayashi, Y., Lü, J.−C., Dong, Z.−M., Barsbold, R., Azuma, Y., and Tomida, Y. (1999) Herbivorous diet in an ornithomimid dinosaur. Nature 402: 480–481.
  • Sanders F, Manley K, Carpenter K. Gastroliths from the Lower Cretaceous sauropod Cedarosaurus weiskopfae. In: Tanke D.H, Carpenter K, editors. Mesozoic vertebrate life: new research inspired by the paleontology of Philip J. Currie. Indiana University Press; Bloomington, IN: 2001. pp. 166–180.