10 nanometres

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For the length in semiconductor manufacturing context, see 10 nanometer.
Comparison of sizes of semiconductor manufacturing process nodes with some microscopic objects and visible light wavelengths. At this scale, the width of a human hair is about 10 times that of the image.[1]

To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists lengths between 10−8 and 10−7 metres (10 nanometres and 100 nanometres).

Distances shorter than 10 nanometres

  • 10 nm = 10 nanometres = 10−8 metres
  • 10 nm — lower size of tobacco smoke[2]
  • 10 nm Shortest Extreme Ultraviolet wavelength or longest X-ray wavelength[3]
  • 11 nm — the average half-pitch of a memory cell speculated to be manufactured in 2015.
  • 16 nm — technology is projected to be reached by semiconductor companies in the 2013 timeframe
  • 18 nm — diameter of tobacco mosaic virus[4] (Generally, viruses range in size from 20 nm to 450 nm.)[citation needed]
  • 20 nm — width of bacterial flagellum[5]
  • 20 nm to 80 nm — thickness of cell wall in Gram-positive bacteria[6]
  • 22 nm — Smallest feature size of production microprocessors in September 2009[7]
  • 22 nm — the average half-pitch of a memory cell expected to be manufactured at around the 2011–2011 time frame.
  • 30 nm — lower size of cooking oil smoke[2]
  • 32 nm — the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2009–2010 time frame.
  • 45 nm — the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2007–2008 time frame.
  • 50 nm — upper size for airborne virus particles[2]
  • 50 nm — flying height of the head of a hard disk[8]
  • 65 nm — the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2005–2006 time frame.
  • 90 nm — the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2002–2003 time frame.
  • 100 nm — larger than 90% of the particles of wood smoke[citation needed] (ranges from 7 to 3000 nanometres)[2]

Distances longer than 100 nanometres

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Graham T. Smith (2002). Industrial metrology. Springer. p. 253. ISBN 978-1-85233-507-6. 
  2. ^ a b c d Annis, Patty J. October 1991. Kansas State University. Fine Particle POLLUTION. Figure 1. (tobacco smoke: 10 to 1000 nm; virus particles: 3 to 50 nm; bacteria: 30 to 30000 nm; cooking oil smoke: 30 to 30000 nm; wood smoke: 7 to 3000 nm)
  3. ^ Introduction to the Electromagnetic Spectrum and Spectroscopy
  4. ^ Stryer, Lubert (1988). Biochemistry. San Francisco: W.H. Freeman. ISBN 0-7167-1843-X. 
  5. ^ Kojima S, Blair D (2004). "The bacterial flagellar motor: structure and function of a complex molecular machine". Int Rev Cytol. International Review of Cytology 233: 93–134. doi:10.1016/S0074-7696(04)33003-2. ISBN 978-0-12-364637-8. PMID 15037363. 
  6. ^ Microbiology Text.com
  7. ^ http://www.physorg.com/news172852816.html accessed 2009.09.21
  8. ^ help with PCs web site