1 decametre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1 E-6 m - Click on the relevant thumbnail image to jump to the desired Human-scale order of length magnitude: top-left is 1e-6m, bottom-right is 1e5m. 1 E-5 m 1 E-4 m 1 E-3 m 1 E-2 m 1 E-1 m 1 E0 m 1 E1 m 1 E2 m 1 E3 m 1 E4 m 1 E5 m
Click on the thumbnail image to jump to the desired Human-scale order of length magnitude article: top-left is 1E-6 m, lower-right is 1E5 m.
A Blue whale has been measured as 33 metres long; this drawing compares its length to that of a human diver and a dolphin

To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists lengths between 10 metres and 100 metres.

Distances shorter than 10 metres

Conversions[edit]

10 metres (very rarely termed a decametre which is abbreviated as dam) is equal to:

Human-defined scales and structures[edit]

Sports[edit]

  • 11 metres — approximate width of a doubles tennis court
  • 15 metres — width of a standard FIBA basketball court
  • 15.24 metres — width of an NBA basketball court (50 feet)
  • 18.44 metres — distance between the front of the pitcher's rubber and the rear point of home plate on a baseball field (60 feet, 6 inches)[1]
  • 20 metres — length of cricket pitch (22 yards)[2]
  • 27.43 metres — distance between bases on a baseball field (90 feet)
  • 28 metres — length of a standard FIBA basketball court
  • 28.65 metres — length of an NBA basketball court (94 feet)
  • 49 metres — width of an American football field (53⅓ yards)
  • 59.436 metres — width of a Canadian football field (65 yards)
  • 70 metres — typical width of soccer field
  • 91 metres — length of American football field (100 yards, measured between the goal lines)

Nature[edit]

Astronomical[edit]

Distances longer than 100 metres

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Rule 1.04 The Playing Field" (PDF). Official Baseball Rules. Major League Baseball. 25 January 2010. pp. 1–5. Archived from the original on 27 April 2011. Retrieved 1 April 2011.  See especially Diagram No. 1, page 3.
  2. ^ "Law 7 (The pitch)". Laws of Cricket. Marylebone Cricket Club. October 2010. Archived from the original on 14 May 2011. Retrieved 1 April 2011. 
  3. ^ "Animal Records". Smithsonian National Zoological Park. Archived from the original on 25 April 2009. Retrieved 29 May 2007. 
  4. ^ "Niagara Falls Geology Facts & Figures". Niagara Parks Commission. Retrieved 29 June 2011.