1st Brigade, 7th Infantry Division (United States)

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1st Brigade, 7th Infantry Division
7th ID SSI.svg
7th Infantry Division shoulder sleeve insignia
Active 1917 – 21
1963 – 71
1974 – 94
Country United States United States of America
Branch United States Department of the Army Seal.svg United States Army
Type Infantry
Role Light infantry
Part of 7th Infantry Division
Engagements World War I
Panama

The 1st Brigade, 7th Infantry Division was an infantry brigade of the United States Army, and a part of the 7th Infantry Division. The brigade was based at Fort Ord, California for most of its history. After the Korean War, it was activated as a brigade in 1963, and was returned to the United States where it saw action in Operation Just Cause and Operation Golden Pheasant before being finally deactivated in 1995.

History[edit]

World War I[edit]

The 1st Brigade, 7th Infantry Division was first constituted and activated in the Regular Army as the Headquarters Company, 7th Division on 6 December 1917 at Camp Wheeler, Georgia.[1] One month later it organized and prepared for deployment to Europe to participate in World War I as a part of the American Expeditionary Force, along with the rest of the division.[2] Two subordinate brigades were assigned to the headquarters, the 13th Infantry Brigade and the 14th Infantry Brigade.[1] Most of the division sailed to Europe aboard the SS Leviathan.[3]

During its time in France, the headquarters company did not participate as a whole in any engagements, though its infantry and reconnaissance elements did engage German forces.[3] On 22 September 1921, the Headquarters Company, 7th Division was inactivated.[2]

On 1 July 1940, the 7th Infantry Division was reactivated at Camp Ord, California[2] Under the command of Major General Joseph W. Stilwell.[3] The infantry brigade headquarters remained inactive during this period, until the division was reorganized under the Reorganization Objective Army Divisions plan.[4]

Post-Korean War[edit]

In the wake of the Korean War, between 1953 to 1971, the 7th Infantry Division defended the Korean Demilitarized Zone. Its main garrison was Camp Casey, South Korea. During this period, the division was restructured in compliance with the Reorganization Objective Army Divisions tables of organization.[1] In 1963, the division's former headquarters company grew into the 1st Brigade, 7th Infantry Division.[1] On 2 April 1971, the division and its brigades returned to the United States and inactivated at Fort Lewis, Washington.[2]

Tactical map of Operation Just Cause.

In October 1974 the 7th and two brigades reactivated at their former garrison, Fort Ord (a National Guard "roundout" brigade, the 41st, would periodically train with the division as its third brigade).[2] The unit did not see any action in Vietnam or during the post war era, but was tasked to keep a close watch on South American developments. It trained at Fort Ord, Camp Roberts, and Fort Hunter Liggett. On 1 October 1985 the division redesignated as the 7th Infantry Division (Light), organized again as a light infantry division. The various battalions of the 17th, 31st, and 32nd Regiments moved from the division, replaced by battalions from other regiments, including battalions from the 21st Infantry Regiment, the 27th Infantry Regiment, and the 9th Infantry Regiment. The 27th Infantry and the 9th Infantry Regiment participated in Operation Golden Pheasant in Honduras.[5] In 1989 the 1st Brigade (or 9th Infantry Regiment as it was more commonly known), 7th Infantry Division participated in Operation Just Cause in Panama.[5]

In 1991 the Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommended the closing of Fort Ord due to the escalating cost of living on the central California coastline. By 1994, the garrison was to be closed and the division was to relocate to Fort Lewis, Washington.[6] Elements of the division (the 2nd Brigade, to include its Headquarters and Headquarters Company, the 3rd Brigade's 3rd Battalion 17th Infantry Regiment and other assigned military police companies) participated in one final mission in the United States before inactivation; quelling the 1992 Los Angeles Riots, called Operation Garden Plot.[7] In 1993 the division was slated to move to Fort Lewis, WA and inactivate as part of the post-Cold War drawdown of the US Army, but the 2nd and 3rd Brigades of the 7th inactivated at Ft. Ord in 1993. The 1st Brigade relocated to Ft. Lewis and was later reflagged as the 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Infantry Division while the division headquarters formally inactivated on 16 June 1994 at Fort Lewis.[2]

Honors[edit]

Unit decorations[edit]

Ribbon Award Year Notes
Meritorious Unit Commendation ribbon.svg Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) 1953 for service in Korea
Korean Presidential Unit Citation.png Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation 1950 for the Inchon Landings
Korean Presidential Unit Citation.png Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation 1950–1953 for service in Korea
Korean Presidential Unit Citation.png Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation 1945–1948; 1953–1971 for service in Korea
Philippines Presidential Unit Citation.png Philippine Presidential Unit Citation 1944–1945 for service in the Philippines during World War II


Campaign streamers[edit]

Conflict Streamer Year(s)
World War I Lorraine 1918
World War II Aleutian Islands 1943
World War II Eastern Mandates 1944
World War II Leyte 1945
World War II Ryukyus 1945
Korean War UN Defensive 1950
Korean War UN Offensive 1950
Korean War CCF Intervention 1950
Korean War First UN Counteroffensive 1950
Korean War CCF Spring Offensive 1951
Korean War UN Summer-Fall Offensive 1951
Korean War Second Korean Winter 1951–1952
Korean War Korea, Summer-Fall 1952 1952
Korean War Third Korean Winter 1952–1953
Korean War Korea, Summer 1953 1953


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d McGrath, p. 188.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Lineage and Honors Information: 7th Infantry Division". United States Army Center of Military History. 2009. Archived from the original on 20 July 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c "7th Infantry Division Homepage: History". 7th Infantry Division. 2003. Archived from the original on 20 July 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2009. 
  4. ^ Almanac, p. 592.
  5. ^ a b "GlobalSecurity.org: 7th Infantry Division". GlobalSecurity. 2003. Archived from the original on 17 April 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2009. 
  6. ^ "GlobalSecurity.org: Fort Ord". GlobalSecurity. 2003. Archived from the original on 18 April 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2009. 
  7. ^ "GlobalSecurity.org: Operation Garden Plot". GlobalSecurity. 2003. Archived from the original on 18 April 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2009. 

Sources[edit]

  • McGrath, John J. (2004). The Brigade: A History: Its Organization and Employment in the US Army. Combat Studies Institute Press. ISBN 978-1-4404-4915-4. 
  • Army Almanac: A Book of Facts Concerning the Army of the United States. United States Government Printing Office. 1959. ASIN B0006D8NKK. 

External links[edit]