2-Bromobutane

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2-Bromobutane
Skeletal formula of 2-bromobutane
Names
IUPAC name
2-Bromobutane[1]
Other names
sec-Butylbromide
Identifiers
505949
78-76-2 YesY
ChEMBL ChEMBL156276 YesY
ChemSpider 6306 YesY
552796 R YesY
EC number 201-140-7
Jmol-3D images Image
MeSH 2-bromobutane
PubChem 6554
637147 R
12236140 S
RTECS number EJ6228000
UN number 2339
Properties
C4H9Br
Molar mass 137.02 g·mol−1
Appearance Colourless liquid
Density 1.255 g mL−1
Melting point −112.65 °C; −170.77 °F; 160.50 K
Boiling point 91 °C; 196 °F; 364 K
log P 2.672
1.437
Thermochemistry
−156 kJ mol−1
−2.706–−2.704 MJ mol−1
Hazards
GHS pictograms The flame pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word DANGER
H225
P210
EU classification Highly Flammable F
R-phrases R11
S-phrases S16, S24/25
Flash point 21 °C (70 °F; 294 K)
Related compounds
Related alkanes
Except where noted otherwise, data is given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

2-Bromobutane is an isomer of 1-bromobutane. Both compounds share the molecular formula C4H9Br. 2-Bromobutane is also known as sec-butyl bromide or methylethylbromomethane. Because it contains bromine, a halogen, it is part of a larger class of compounds known as alkyl halides. It is a colorless liquid with a pleasant odor. Because the carbon atom connected to the bromine is connected to two other carbons the molecule is referred to as a secondary alkyl halide.

2-Bromobutane is relatively stable, but is toxic and flammable. It is prone to undergo an E2 reaction if treated with a strong base, which is a bimolecular elimination which results in an alkene (double bond) product. 2-Bromobutane is an irritant, and harmful if ingested. It can irritate and burn skin and eyes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2-bromobutane - Compound Summary". PubChem Compound. USA: National Center for Biotechnology Information. 26 March 2005. Retrieved 17 June 2012.