2000 in British music

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2000s in music in the UK
Number-one singles
Number-one albums
Best-selling singles
Best-selling albums
Events
2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
Charts
2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
1999 2010
Top 10 singles
2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
1999 2010

This is a summary of 2000 in music in the United Kingdom.

Events[edit]

Classical music[edit]

New works[edit]

  • Thomas Adès – Piano Quintet, op. 20
  • Julian AndersonAlhambra Suite, for chamber orchestra
  • Edward Cowie
    • Bad Lands Gold, for tuba and piano
    • Concerto for oboe and orchestra
    • Dark Matter, for brass ensemble
    • Elysium IV, for orchestra
    • Four Frames in a Row, for high voice and baroque ensemble
    • The Healing of Saul, for violin and harp (or piano)
    • Several Charms, for violin and piano
  • Peter Maxwell Davies
    • Symphony No. 7
    • Symphony No. 8 Antarctica
  • James MacMillan – Mass, for choir and organ
  • Roger Smalley – String Quartet No. 2
  • John TavenerSong of the Cosmos

Opera[edit]

Albums[edit]

Film and TV scores and incidental music[edit]

Musical films[edit]

Music awards[edit]

BRIT Awards[edit]

The 2000 BRIT Awards winners were:

Mercury Music Prize[edit]

The 2000 Mercury Music Prize was awarded to Badly Drawn BoyThe Hour of Bewilderbeast.

Record of the Year[edit]

The Record of the Year was awarded to "My Love" by Westlife

Deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rob Evans (January 11, 2000). "Billy Corgan Slammed As Smashing Pumpkins Manager Quits". Soundspike. Retrieved October 15, 2012. 
  2. ^ Esc Today.com | Eurovision S Contest 2000
  3. ^ Peter Donohoe official website. Accessed 6 November 2014
  4. ^ BBC news
  5. ^ "Dick Morrissey". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2014-06-27. 
  6. ^ "Singer Kirsty MacColl dies". news.bbc.co.uk (BBC News). 19 December 2000. Retrieved 2007-12-04. 
  7. ^ "The Singing Postman (Allan Smethurst)". Literarynorfolk.co.uk. Retrieved 25 March 2012.