2001 New York Yankees season

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2001 New York Yankees
2001 AL East Champions
2001 AL Champions
Yankees vs. Angels 2001 (Yankees crop).jpg
Yankees' fielders huddling on the
pitcher's mound during an August 2001 away game
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) George Steinbrenner
Manager(s) Joe Torre
Local television WNYW
(Bobby Murcer, Tim McCarver)
MSG
(Ken Singleton, Jim Kaat, Al Trautwig, Suzyn Waldman)
Local radio WABC (AM)
(John Sterling, Michael Kay)
Previous season     Next season

The New York Yankees' 2001 season was the 99th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 95-65 finishing 13.5 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe Torre. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. Roger Clemens had sixteen straight wins, tying an American League mark shared by Walter Johnson, Lefty Grove, Schoolboy Rowe, and Smoky Joe Wood. Clemens would finish the season with the AL Cy Young Award and become the first pitcher to win six Cy Young Awards.[1]

Another chapter was written in the story of the Yankee-Red Sox rivalry. On September 2, 2001, Mike Mussina came within one strike of a perfect game before surrendering a bloop single to Carl Everett. This was Mussina's third time he has taken a perfect game to or beyond the 8th inning. Coincidentally, it would have been the 3rd perfect game in for the Yankees in a span of 4 seasons and could have been the 4th perfect game in franchise history.

In the emotional times of September 2001 in New York City, following the September 11 attack on New York's World Trade Center, the Yankees defeated the Oakland A's three games to two in the ALDS, and then the Seattle Mariners, who had won 116 games, four games to one in the ALCS. By winning the pennant for a fourth straight year, the 1998-2001 Yankees joined the 1921-1924 New York Giants, and the Yankee teams of 1936-1939, 1949–1953, 1955–1958 and 1960-1964 as the only dynasties to reach at least four straight pennants. The Yankees had now won eleven consecutive postseason series over a four-year period. However, the Yankees lost the World Series in a dramatic 7 game series to the Arizona Diamondbacks, when Yankee star closer Mariano Rivera uncharacteristically lost the lead - and the Series - in the bottom of the ninth inning of the final game. With the loss, this marked the second time in five years that a team lost the World Series after taking a lead into the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7 (following the Cleveland Indians in 1997) and the first time since 1991 that the home team won all seven games of a World Series.[2][3]

Despite the loss in the series, Derek Jeter provided one bright spot. Despite a very poor series overall, batting under .200, he got the nickname, "Mr. November," for his walk-off home run in Game 4, though it began October 31, as the game ended in the first minutes of November 1. In calling the home run, Yankees broadcaster Michael Kay said "See ya! See ya! See ya! A home run for Derek Jeter! He is Mr. November! Oh what a home run by Derek Jeter!" He said this after noticing a fan's sign that said "Mr. November".

Also, during the emotional times following the attacks, Yankee Stadium played host to a memorial service, just before the Yankees played their first home game following the attacks. The service was titled "Prayer for America".

Offseason[edit]

  • November 21, 2000: Joe Oliver was signed as a Free Agent with the New York Yankees.[4]
  • November 30, 2000: Mike Mussina was signed as a Free Agent with the New York Yankees.[4]
  • December 7, 2000: Dwight Gooden signed as a Free Agent with the New York Yankees.[5]
  • December 7, 2000: Luis Sojo was signed as a Free Agent with the New York Yankees.[6]
  • December 11, 2000: Brandon Knight was drafted by the Minnesota Twins from the New York Yankees in the 2000 rule 5 draft.[7]
  • February 15, 2001: Henry Rodriguez was signed as a Free Agent with the New York Yankees.[8]
  • March 21, 2001: Drew Henson was traded by the Cincinnati Reds with Michael Coleman to the New York Yankees for Wily Mo Pena.[9]
  • March 28, 2001: Glenallen Hill was traded by the New York Yankees to the Anaheim Angels for Darren Blakely (minors).[10]
  • March 28, 2001: Brandon Knight was returned (earlier draft pick) by the Minnesota Twins to the New York Yankees.[7]
  • March 30, 2001: Brandon Knight was released by the New York Yankees.[7]

Regular season[edit]

The Yankees taking the field during a late August 2001 game at Edison Field.

Season standings[edit]

AL East W L Pct. GB
New York Yankees 95 65 .594 --
Boston Red Sox 82 79 .509 13.5
Toronto Blue Jays 80 82 .494 16.0
Baltimore Orioles 63 98 .391 32.5
Tampa Bay Devil Rays 62 100 .383 34.0

Notable transactions[edit]

  • April 1, 2001: Brandon Knight was signed as a Free Agent with the New York Yankees.[7]
  • June 5, 2001: John Ford Griffin was drafted by the New York Yankees in the 1st round (23rd pick) of the 2001 amateur draft. Player signed June 14, 2001.[11]
  • June 5, 2001: Bronson Sardinha was drafted by the New York Yankees in the 1st round (34th pick) of the 2001 amateur draft. Player signed June 13, 2001.[12]
  • June 19, 2001: Henry Rodriguez was released by the New York Yankees.[8]
  • June 20, 2001: Joe Oliver was released by the New York Yankees.[4]
  • July 4, 2001: Bobby Estalella was traded by the San Francisco Giants with Joe Smith (minors) to the New York Yankees for Brian Boehringer.[13]
  • August 31, 2001: Randy Velarde was traded by the Texas Rangers to the New York Yankees for players to be named later. The New York Yankees sent Randy Flores (October 12, 2001) and Rosman Garcia (October 11, 2001) to the Texas Rangers to complete the trade.[14]

Roster[edit]

2001 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; R = Runs; H = Hits; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In; Avg. = Batting Average; SB = Stolen Bases

= Indicates team leader
Pos. Player G AB R H HR RBI Avg. SB
C Jorge Posada 138 484 59 134 22 95 .277 2
1B Tino Martinez 154 589 89 165 34 113 .280 1
2B Alfonso Soriano 158 574 77 154 18 73 .268 43
3B Scott Brosius 120 428 57 123 13 49 .287 3
SS Derek Jeter 150 614 110 191 21 74 .311 27
LF Chuck Knoblauch 137 521 66 130 9 44 .250 38
CF Bernie Williams 146 540 102 166 26 94 .307 11
RF Paul O’Neill 137 510 77 136 21 70 .267 22
DH David Justice 111 381 58 92 18 51 .241 1

[15]

Other batters[edit]

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI Avg. SB
Darren Bragg 5 4 1 1 0 0 .250 0
Bobby Estallela 3 4 1 0 0 0 .000 0
Nick Johnson 23 67 6 13 2 8 .194 0
Donzell McDonald 5 3 0 1 0 0 .333 0
Joe Oliver 12 36 3 9 1 2 .250 0
Juan Rivera 3 4 0 0 0 0 .000 0
Henry Rodriguez 5 8 0 0 0 0 .000 0
Scott Seabol 1 1 0 0 0 0 .000 0
Luis Sojo 39 79 5 13 0 9 .165 1
Shane Spencer 80 283 40 73 10 46 .258 4
Randy Velarde 15 46 4 7 0 1 .152 2
Enrique Wilson 48 99 10 24 1 12 .242 0

Starting pitchers[edit]

Player G IP W L ERA CG SO BB
Mike Mussina 34 228.7 17 11 3.15 4 214 42
Roger Clemens 33 220.3 20 3 3.51 0 213 72
Andy Pettitte 31 200.7 15 10 3.99 2 164 41
Ted Lilly 26 120.7 5 6 5.37 0 112 51
Orlando Hernandez 17 94.7 4 7 4.85 0 77 42
Randy Keisler 10 50.7 1 2 6.22 0 36 34
Sterling Hitchcock 10 51.3 4 4 6.49 1 28 18

[15]

Other pitchers[edit]

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Relief pitchers[edit]
Player G IP W L SV ERA SO BB
Mariano Rivera 71 80.7 4 6 50 2.34 83 12
Mike Stanton 76 80.3 9 4 0 2.58 78 29
Ramiro Mendoza 56 100.7 8 4 6 3.75 70 23
Randy Choate 37 48.3 3 1 0 3.35 35 27
Jay Witasick 32 40.3 3 0 0 4.69 53 18

ALDS[edit]

Series Summary:

Yankees win series 3-2, becoming the first team in MLB history to win the ALDS after dropping the first two games at home.

ALCS[edit]

Game Score Date Location Attendance
1 New York - 4, Seattle - 2 October 17 Safeco Field 47,644
2 New York - 3, Seattle - 2 October 18 Safeco Field 47,791
3 Seattle - 14, New York - 3 October 20 Yankee Stadium 56,517
4 Seattle - 1, New York - 3 October 21 Yankee Stadium 56,375
5 Seattle - 3, New York - 12 October 22 Yankee Stadium 56,370

World series[edit]

Main article: 2001 World Series
President Bush tosses out the ceremonial first pitch before a 2-1 Yankee victory in Game 3 of the 2001 World Series.

Game 1[edit]

October 27, 2001 at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix, Arizona

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 2
Arizona 1 0 4 4 0 0 0 0 x 9 10 0
W: Curt Schilling (1-0)   L: Mike Mussina (0-1)  
HR: ARICraig Counsell (1), Luis Gonzalez (1)

Game 2[edit]

October 28, 2001 at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix, Arizona

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Arizona 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 x 4 5 0
W: Randy Johnson (1-0)   L: Andy Pettitte (0-1)  
HR: ARIMatt Williams (1)

Game 3[edit]

October 30, 2001 at Yankee Stadium in New York, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Arizona 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 3
New York 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 x 2 7 1
W: Roger Clemens (1-0)   L: Brian Anderson (0-1)  S: Mariano Rivera (1)
HR: NYYJorge Posada (1)

Game 4[edit]

October 31, 2001 at Yankee Stadium in New York, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 R H E
Arizona 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 6 0
New York 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 7 0
W: Mariano Rivera (1-0)   L: Byung-Hyun Kim (0-1)  
HR: ARIMark Grace (1)    NYYShane Spencer (1), Tino Martinez (1), Derek Jeter (1)

Game 5[edit]

November 1, 2001 at Yankee Stadium in New York, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R H E
Arizona 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 0
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 3 9 1
W: Sterling Hitchcock (1-0)   L: Albie Lopez (0-1)  
HR: ARISteve Finley (1), Rod Barajas (1)    NYYScott Brosius (1)

Game 6[edit]

November 3, 2001 at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix, Arizona

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 7 1
Arizona 1 3 8 3 0 0 0 0 x 15 22 0
W: Randy Johnson (2-0)   L: Andy Pettitte (0-2)  

Game 7[edit]

November 4, 2001 at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix, Arizona

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 6 3
Arizona 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 3 11 0
W: Randy Johnson (3-0)   L: Mariano Rivera (1-1)  
HR: NYYAlfonso Soriano (1)

Awards and records[edit]

  • Roger Clemens became the first pitcher to reach his 20th win with only 1 loss.[16]
  • Roger Clemens, AL Cy Young Award

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AAA Columbus Clippers International League Trey Hillman
AA Norwich Navigators Eastern League Stump Merrill
A Tampa Yankees Florida State League Brian Butterfield
A Greensboro Bats South Atlantic League Mitch Seoane
Short-Season A Staten Island Yankees New York-Penn League Joe Arnold
Rookie GCL Yankees Gulf Coast League Derek Shelton

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: GCL Yankees; LEAGUE CO-CHAMPIONS: Tampa[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nemec, David; Flatow, Scott. Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures (2008 ed.). New York: Penguin Group. p. 234. ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0. 
  2. ^ Olney, Buster (November 5, 2001). "In Final Twist, New York Falls in Ninth". New York Times. p. A1. 
  3. ^ Walker, Ben (November 5, 2001). "Diamondbacks 3, Yankees 2". Associated Press. "The other two all-home victory Series were both won by Minnesota, 1987 and 1991." 
  4. ^ a b c http://www.baseball-reference.com/o/olivejo01.shtml
  5. ^ Dwight Gooden Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com
  6. ^ http://www.baseball-reference.com/s/sojolu01.shtml
  7. ^ a b c d http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/k/knighbr01.shtml
  8. ^ a b http://www.baseball-reference.com/r/rodrihe02.shtml
  9. ^ http://www.baseball-reference.com/h/hensodr01.shtml
  10. ^ Glenallen Hill Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com
  11. ^ John-Ford Griffin Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com
  12. ^ Bronson Sardinha Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com
  13. ^ Bobby Estalella Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com
  14. ^ http://www.baseball-reference.com/v/velarra01.shtml
  15. ^ a b http://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/NYY/2001.shtml
  16. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.372, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, NY, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  17. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 3rd edition. Durham, N.C.: Baseball America, 2007
Preceded by
New York Yankees
2000
AL East Championship Season
2001
Succeeded by
New York Yankees
2002
Preceded by
New York Yankees
2000
American League champion
2001
Succeeded by
Anaheim Angels
2002