2002–03 Arsenal F.C. season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Arsenal
2002–03 season
Chairman Peter Hill-Wood
Manager Arsène Wenger
Premier League 2nd
FA Cup Winners
Worthington Cup Third round
FA Community Shield Winners
UEFA Champions League Second group stage
Top goalscorer League:
Thierry Henry (24)
All:
Thierry Henry (32)
Highest home attendance 38,164 vs Manchester United
(16 April 2003)
Lowest home attendance 19,059 vs Sunderland
(6 November 2002)
Average home league attendance 38,041
Home colours
Away colours
Third colours

The 2002–03 season was the 105th season of competitive football played by Arsenal. The club retained the FA Cup, a feat last achieved by Tottenham Hotspur in 1982, but finished runners-up to Manchester United in the Premier League. In the UEFA Champions League, defeat to Valencia in the second group stage meant Arsenal exited the competition at the same round for the second successive year.

Arsenal began the new campaign as league and cup double winners, and manager Arsène Wenger sought improvement in the Champions League, a competition the club failed in. The retirement of defender Tony Adams meant French midfielder Patrick Vieira was appointed as captain; Pascal Cygan was signed as a replacement in defence. Other recruitments included defensive midfielders Gilberto Silva and Kolo Touré, while goalkeepers Alex Manninger and Richard Wright departed to join Espanyol and Everton respectively.

In the league, a 4–1 win against Leeds United in September meant the club broke the record for scoring in consecutive games (47), and away league games without defeat (22). The club began 2003 in first position, but subsequently floundered; a draw to Aston Villa in April allowing Manchester United to move joint top. A further draw at Bolton Wanderers meant the league championship was, mathematically, out of Arsenal's hands and defeat to Leeds a week after ended their chances of retaining the league. Consolation came in retaining the FA Cup; a solitary goal scored by midfielder Robert Pirès was enough to beat Southampton in the 2003 final.

30 different players represented the club in five competitions and there were 17 different goalscorers. Arsenal's top goalscorer was Thierry Henry, who scored 32 goals in 55 appearances.

Background[edit]

Arsenal began the 2001–02 season in good form and a win against Liverpool in December 2001 – having gone down to ten men in the first half, helped them move second in the table.[1] A draw against Southampton on 2 February 2002 started a run of 13 consecutive league wins – a new record, beginning against Everton.[2] Arsenal won the league away to Manchester United at Old Trafford on 8 May 2002; the winning goal was scored by Sylvain Wiltord in the second half.[3] The result meant the team were unbeaten away from home all season, and in scoring four goals against Everton on the final day, became the first team to score in every league match they played.[4] Arsenal completed the double, having beaten Chelsea 2–0 in the 2002 FA Cup Final.

Wenger hoped his team's success would begin an era of dominating English football for years to come, citing a "shift of power".[5] He moreover aimed for significant improvement in the Champions League, a competition where the club failed to reach higher than the quarter-finals.[6] Such was Arsenal's impressive form in late summer, Wenger commented that his team could go the entire season undefeated.[a]

Arsenal's kit sponsorship with O2 came into action in the 2002–03 season, replacing SEGA Dreamcast.[8]

Transfers[edit]

Wenger appointed midfielder Patrick Vieira as captain after Tony Adams announced his retirement from football.[9] Defender Lee Dixon left the club after 14 years, retiring at the age of 38.[10] Arsenal did not spend big in the transfer market unlike their rivals and only made subtle additions to the squad: World Cup winner Gilberto Silva and defender Pascal Cygan. English duo Martin Keown and goalkeeper David Seaman extended their stay at the club for two and one more years respectively.

In the January transfer window, defender Matthew Upson was sold to Birmingham City and midfielder Steve Sidwell joined Reading on an undisclosed fee.[11] Goalkeeper Guillaume Warmuz signed a short-term contract with Arsenal, as cover for Seaman, Stuart Taylor and Rami Shaaban.[11]

In[edit]

No. Position Player Transferred from Fee Date Ref
18 DF France Pascal Cygan France Lille £2,100,000 11 July 2002 [12]
19 MF Brazil Gilberto Silva Brazil Atlético Mineiro £4,500,000 7 August 2002 [13]
24 GK Sweden Rami Shaaban Sweden Djurgårdens Undisclosed 30 August 2002 [14]
20 GK France Guillaume Warmuz France Lens Undisclosed 31 January 2003 [15]

Out[edit]

No. Position Player Transferred to Fee Date Ref
2 DF England Lee Dixon Retired 1 July 2002 [10]
6 DF England Tony Adams Retired 1 July 2002 [16]
13 GK Austria Alex Manninger Spain Espanyol £960,000 4 July 2002 [17]
24 GK England Richard Wright England Everton £3,500,000 24 July 2002 [18]
45 MF England Steve Sidwell England Reading Undisclosed 20 January 2003 [19]
20 DF England Matthew Upson England Birmingham City £2,500,000 22 January 2003 [20]

Pre-season[edit]

FA Community Shield[edit]

As Premier League and FA Cup winners, Arsenal contested the 2002 FA Community Shield against league runners-up Liverpool. Gilberto, making his debut for Arsenal in the second half as a substitute, scored the winning goal, in a match where the team missed numerous chances.[23]

Premier League[edit]

August–October[edit]

"We're all fighting for second place now. It was demoralising. They just pass and move, pass and move. You find yourself working for nothing."

—Leeds midfielder Olivier Dacourt, 28 September 2002[24]

Arsenal began the season with a 2–0 home victory against promoted Birmingham City; goals from Thierry Henry and Sylvain Wiltord extended the club's winning run to fourteen matches – a new top-flight record.[25] A late equaliser by Wiltord in their next match at West Ham United earned Arsenal a point, having trailed 2–0 in the first half.[26] Three days later, a 5–2 win against West Bromwich Albion moved Arsenal to the top of the league table.[27] Although they drew to Chelsea at Stamford Bridge, having lost captain Vieira through a sending-off,[28] a win against Manchester City meant Arsenal leapfrogged local rivals Tottenham Hotspur to first position.[29] A 3–0 win at Charlton Athletic on 15 September 2002 pleased Wenger, who indicated after the match the league was theirs to lose: "We know we can win the league. We know we can be stronger. At this stage last season we were not as good as we are now."[30] Striker Kanu scored a stoppage time winner against Bolton Wanderers to win their eleventh successive home game.[31]

At Elland Road, Leeds United hosted Arsenal on 28 September 2002. Goals from Kolo Touré and Henry and a brace from Kanu ensured Arsenal eclipsed Nottingham Forest's record of 22 away league games without defeat[32] and scored in 47 consecutive league matches, breaking Chesterfield Town's achievement.[33] Wenger hailed the performance as "edging nearer to perfection",[34] adding it evoked memories of the Ajax team in the 1970s: "We are playing great, 'Total Football'. Danger comes from everywhere."[35] Leeds manager Terry Venables agreed: "Manchester United have been exceptional for 10 years – but I've not seen anything as good as that."[32] Arsenal began October with a 3–1 win against Sunderland, breaking Manchester United's Premier League record of 30 matches unbeaten.[36] They however suffered their first defeat of the season, against Everton; teenager Wayne Rooney scored from long range in the last minute of the match.[37] Wenger used his post-match press conference to praise the striker: "At that age, Rooney is already a complete footballer. The guy can play. He's the best English under-20 I've seen since I came here [in 1996]."[38] In spite of dominating their next match against Blackburn Rovers – "27 goal attempts, 14 on target,"[39] Arsenal were beaten 2–1; the winning goal was scored by Dwight Yorke in the second half.[39] It was the team's third consecutive defeat in all competitions, their worst run since November 2000, and moved league leaders Liverpool four points clear at the top of the table.[39]

November–February[edit]

A Steve Marlet own goal gave Arsenal a much-needed 1–0 win against Fulham, ceasing their run of four defeats on 3 November 2002.[40] Another 1–0 win, this time against Newcastle United moved Arsenal one point behind leaders Liverpool.[41] Vieira's performance in particular was plauded in The Guardian as a "demonstration of tackling, control, awareness and movement that was exceptional even by his standards."[42] In the North London derby on 16 November 2002, Arsenal beat Tottenham Hotpsur 3–0 to go back at the top of the league table.[43] The opening goal, scored by Henry was later voted the Goal of the Season by viewers of ITV's The Premiership,[44] having picked up the ball from Arsenal's side of the pitch and running past the opposition defence to shoot past goalkeeper Kasey Keller.[45] At St Mary's Stadium, Arsenal lost 3–2 to Southampton; striker James Beattie scored twice against an Arsenal defence, who conceded three goals in total for the first time since May 2001.[46] Defender Sol Campbell had been sent off in the match, and was suspended for a further game, against Manchester United. Arsenal ended the month with a 3–1 victory over visitors Aston Villa; midfielder Robert Pirès scoring for the second successive league match and Henry adding a further two goals.[47]

Arsenal faced Manchester United at Old Trafford on 7 December 2002; the home team had beaten title challengers Liverpool the previous weekend. Manchester United opened the scoring in the 21st minute – a poor clearance by Cygan allowed Juan Sebastián Verón to score.[48] Arsenal goalkeeper Rami Shaaban was substituted before the start of the second half, having pulled a thigh muscle.[48] He was replaced by Stuart Taylor, who was helpless to prevent Paul Scholes from scoring a second goal, 15 minutes before the final whistle.[48] A 1–1 draw at Tottenham Hotspur[49] was followed by a win against Middlesbrough; a goal apiece from Campbell and Pirès meant Arsenal were top of the table on Christmas.[50] On Boxing Day, Arsenal came from a goal down to beat West Brom 2–1; in doing so, they extended their lead at the top to four points.[51] Three days later, Arsenal's lead was increased to five points, having drawn with Liverpool.[52]

In spite of conceding two late goals against Chelsea, Arsenal won by a solitary goal on New Year's Day to maintain their lead.[53] Two goals from Henry against Birmingham City took his total for the club to 100 goals in all competitions;[54] Wenger declared the display – a 4–0 win, as his team's best since beating Leeds United in September.[55] Henry scored a hat-trick for Arsenal against West Ham United on 19 January 2003[56] but the team drew at Liverpool in spite of a polished performance; Emile Heskey headered the ball into the net, scoring for the home team after 90 minutes.[57] On 1 February 2003, Pirès scored a late goal against Fulham, extending Arsenal's lead to six points at the top.[58] This was followed by a 1–1 draw against Newcastle United; manager Sir Bobby Robson after the game criticised referee Neale Barry for his decision to send off midfielder Laurent Robert and Dennis Bergkamp's role in the dismissal, suggesting he "wasn't trying to play the ball to anybody. He kicked the ball against Laurent – I've seen other players do that and I don't like it."[59] Arsenal beat Manchester City 5–1 in their final trip to Maine Road on 22 February 2003. The first four goals, all scored before the half-hour, came at a time when "[Alex] Ferguson ordered the radio to be switched before they reached Old Trafford, presumably in ghastly silence."[60]

March–May[edit]

"I've always plumped for Arsenal, until now. It seemed to me earlier in the season they could score goals whenever they wanted. But they've seen all these points being lost and, without sitting on the fence, I really don't have a clue now. It's all up for grabs."

—Manager Graham Taylor, 5 April 2003[61]

On 2 March 2003, Arsenal opened up an eight-point lead at the top of the table, winning 2–0 against Charlton Athletic.[62] The result was enough for Irish bookmaker Paddy Power to pay out on punters backing Arsenal to retain their lead, despite Manchester United having a game in hand.[63] The gap was cut to two points after Arsenal suffered their first defeat in 2003, against Blackburn Rovers.[64] By the time Arsenal played Everton on 23 March 2003, they were displaced at the top of the table by Manchester United. A goal by Vieira moved the team two points clear once more.[65]

An own goal scored by Touré meant Fredrik Ljungberg's opener against Aston Villa was cancelled out and the match ended in a draw, albeit helping Arsenal back to first position on goal difference.[66] Leading up to the potential championship decider against Manchester United on 16 April 2003, Wenger was adamant his team were mentally ready to retain the title: "We want to be a team who makes history. That's what's really driving us on. We are not worrying about United too much. We are just concentrating on expressing our togetherness, our mental strength and our qualities. We have enough players who can win this game."[67] Having conceded a first half goal scored by Ruud van Nistelrooy, Arsenal overturned Manchester United's lead before Ryan Giggs equalised for the away team.[68] The match ended 2–2; Campbell was sent off for elbowing Ole Gunnar Solskjær and was banned the rest of the season, whereas Vieira limped off with an injury.[68] Although the result helped Manchester United move back top, they had played one game more than Arsenal.[68] Arsenal won their next match at Middlesbrough,[69] but squandered a two-goal lead away to Bolton Wanderers in the last ten minutes. The result, "a big blow" for Arsenal's title hopes,[70] meant the championship was now in Manchester United's favour.[70]

With Manchester United beating Charlton Athletic 4–1 on 3 May 2003, Arsenal, a day later, needed a win against Leeds United to restore any hope of finishing top of the league.[71] In a five-goal match, an 88th minute goal by Mark Viduka ensured Leeds United's survival in the top division and Manchester United's recapture of the Premiership.[72] Wenger revoked suggestion that the league campaign was a "failure", arguing his team were consistent:

Of course we want to win the league but I think the most difficult thing for the club is to be consistent and we have been remarkably consistent. We are in the cup final; we lose the league to a team who spends 50% more money every year – last year they bought a player for £30m pounds when they lost the championship. They will do the same next year and we [have] done miracles just to fight with them.[73]

Arsenal won their final two matches of the league season, against Southampton – where Pirès and Jermaine Pennant both scored a hat-trick[74] – and Sunderland, ending the season with 78 points.[75]

Classification[edit]

Further information: Final League Table
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1 Manchester United (C) 38 25 8 5 74 34 +40 83 2003–04 UEFA Champions League Group stage
2 Arsenal 38 23 9 6 85 42 +43 78
3 Newcastle United 38 21 6 11 63 48 +15 69 2003–04 UEFA Champions League Third qualifying round
4 Chelsea 38 19 10 9 68 38 +30 67

Source: [76]
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored
(C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (E) = Eliminated; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round.
Only applicable when the season is not finished:
(Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular phase indicated; (RQ) = Qualified to the relegation tournament indicated; (DQ) = Disqualified from tournament.

Results summary[edit]

Overall Home Away
Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts W D L GF GA GD W D L GF GA GD
38 23 9 6 85 42 +43 78 15 2 2 47 20 +27 8 7 4 38 22 +16

Source: [76]

Results by round[edit]

Round 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38
Ground H A H A H A H A H A H A H H A H A A H A H H A H A H A A H A H A H A A H H A
Result W D W D W W W W W L L W W W L W L D W W D W W W D W D W W L W D D W D L W W
Position 3 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2

Source: [77]
Ground: A = Away; H = Home. Result: D = Draw; L = Lose; W = Win; P = Postponed.

FA Cup[edit]

Arsenal entered the competition in the third round, receiving a bye as a Premier League club. Their opening match was a 2–0 home win against Oxford United on 4 January 2003.[78] Bergkamp scored his 100th goal for the club and an own goal by defender Scott McNiven ensured progression to the next round.[79] Arsenal faced non-league side Farnborough Town but the match switched from Farnborough's ground at Cherrywood Road to Highbury due to concerns over safety.[80] Farnborough as the home team began the match in disastrous fashion, conceding a goal scored by Campbell in the 19th minute, and going down to ten men after Christian Lee was sent off for a professional foul. Francis Jeffers scored twice before Rocky Baptiste added a consolation, beating Cygan for pace and despite having his first shot saved by goalkeeper Taylor, he managed to lift the ball over him and into the net. Lauren and Bergkamp each scored in the final 15 minutes to give Arsenal a 5–1 victory.[81]

Arsenal's fifth round match was away to league rivals Manchester United at Old Trafford on 16 February 2003. After Giggs missed the chance to score past an open goal, midfielder Edu gave Arsenal the lead through a free kick which took a deflection off David Beckham's shoulder. Wiltord scored the second goal of the match in the 52nd minute, running onto a pass from Edu and side-footing the ball past goalkeeper Fabien Barthez.[82] Vieira said of the performance: "We knew when we lost here in the league that we had lost the battle in midfield. We had to put that right, and we did."[83] In the sixth round, Arsenal were drawn at home to Chelsea in a repeat of the previous season's final.[84] Chelsea defender John Terry put his team ahead with a header from a set piece before Arsenal responded through Jeffers and Henry. Frank Lampard scored a late equaliser for the visiting team meaning the match was replayed at Stamford Bridge.[85] An own goal by Terry and a strike by Wiltord in the space of seven minutes during the replay gave Arsenal an early lead against Chelsea. Despite going down to ten men after Cygan was sent off and Terry scoring from a header, the away team scored a third goal through Lauren to ensure progression into the semi-finals.[86] In the semi-final against Sheffield United on 13 April 2003 at Old Trafford, Ljungberg scored the winning goal to help Arsenal reach their third successive FA Cup final appearance.[87] The match was remembered for Seaman, who on his 1,000th appearance in senior football produced a late save to deny Sheffield United from equalising.[88]

In the 2003 FA Cup Final against Southampton, a goal from Pirès, scored in the first half was enough to ensure Arsenal won their ninth FA Cup, becoming the first team to retain the trophy in over 20 years.[89] Wenger commented after the game that his team "got the trophy we wanted"[90] while defender Martin Keown said the FA Cup win was "the best ever".[90] Winning captain David Seaman felt the disappointment of losing out to Manchester United in the league spurred the team on.[90]

League Cup[edit]

Together, with the other clubs playing in European football, Arsenal entered the Football League Cup in the third round, where they were drawn at home to Premier League club Sunderland. Although Arsenal went two goals ahead in the first half, Sunderland responded, scoring three times in 15 minutes.[91] The result was Wenger's fifth defeat in six matches.

UEFA Champions League[edit]

Group stage[edit]

Arsenal greet their fans before their game at Auxerre, October 2, 2002

Arsenal were drawn in Group A, along with German club Borussia Dortmund, Dutch champions PSV Eindhoven and French side Auxerre.[92] A deflected goal by Bergkamp and a counterattack, finished off by Ljungberg on his comeback from injury gave Arsenal the perfect start in the group stages, at home to Borussia Dortmund.[93] At the Philips Stadion, Arsenal produced an impressive display against PSV, winning 4–0.[94] It was their first win in European football away from home in 19 months[94] and the match set a new club record, as Gilberto scored the fastest goal in the competition at 20.07 seconds.[95]

Against Auxerre, Gilberto scored for the second successive matchday to take Arsenal to nine points, but goals from Olivier Kapo and Khalilou Fadiga in the return game inflicted Arsenal's first defeat in the Champions League.[96] In spite of taking the lead against Borussia Dortmund on Matchday 5, Arsenal conceded two goals to lose 2–1.[97] A fourth straight defeat represented the club's worst run in 19 years[97] but with PSV beating Auxerre, Arsenal qualified for the second group stage with a game to spare – that match ending in a 0–0 draw against PSV.[98]

Group A
Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
England Arsenal 6 3 1 2 9 4 +5 10
Germany Borussia Dortmund 6 3 1 2 8 7 +1 10
France Auxerre 6 2 1 3 4 7 −3 7
Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 6 1 3 2 5 8 −3 6

Second group stage[edit]

Henry scored his first hat-trick in Europe for Arsenal against Roma on 27 November 2002 with the player stating; "It's wonderful to score a hat-trick but it's even more important that I did so in a game we've won."[99] The result was followed with four consecutive draws – three at home against Roma, Valencia and Ajax. Arsenal only needed a draw to progress into the knockout stages, but lost 2–1 to Valencia at the Mestalla on 19 March 2003.[100] Reflecting later on the Champions League campaign, Wenger commented that "we lost our qualification at home".[101]

Group A
Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
Spain Valencia 6 2 3 1 5 6 −1 9
Netherlands Ajax 6 1 5 0 6 5 +1 8
England Arsenal 6 1 4 1 6 5 +1 7
Italy Roma 6 1 2 3 7 8 −1 5

Player statistics[edit]

Arsenal used a total of 30 players during the 2002–03 season and there were 17 different goalscorers. There were also two squad members who did not make a first-team appearance in the campaign. Henry featured in 55 matches, three of which he came on as a substitute.

The team scored a total of 112 goals in all competitions. The highest goalscorer was Henry, with 32 goals, followed by Pirès who scored 16 goals. Four Arsenal players were sent off during the season: Vieira, Cygan, Campbell (twice) and Touré.

Key

Numbers in parentheses denote appearances as substitute. Players with number struck through and marked Left club during playing season left the club during the playing season.

No. Pos. Nat. Name Premier League FA Cup League Cup Community Shield Champions League Total Discipline
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals A yellow rectangular card A red rectangular card
1 GK  ENG David Seaman 28 0 5 0 0 0 1 0 9 0 43 0 0 0
3 DF  ENG Ashley Cole 30 (1) 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 9 0 43 (1) 1 7 0
4 MF  FRA Patrick Vieira 24 3 5 0 0 0 1 0 12 0 42 4 11 1
5 DF  ENG Martin Keown 22 (2) 0 5 0 0 0 1 0 4 (1) 0 32 (3) 0 7 0
7 MF  FRA Robert Pirès 21 (5) 14 5 (1) 1 1 1 0 0 8 (1) 0 35 (7) 16 2 0
8 MF  SWE Fredrik Ljungberg 19 (1) 6 3 (1) 1 0 0 0 0 7 (1) 2 29 (3) 9 0 0
9 FW  ENG Francis Jeffers 2 (14) 2 6 3 1 1 0 0 1 (4) 0 10 (18) 6 1 0
10 FW  NED Dennis Bergkamp 23 (6) 4 2 (2) 2 0 0 1 1 6 (1) 1 32 (9) 7 3 0
11 FW  FRA Sylvain Wiltord 27 (7) 10 3 (4) 2 0 0 1 0 10 (2) 1 41 (13) 13 2 0
12 DF  CMR Lauren 26 (1) 2 6 2 0 0 1 0 9 (1) 0 42 (2) 4 8 0
13 GK  ENG Stuart Taylor 7 (1) 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 (1) 0 11 (2) 0 0 0
14 FW  FRA Thierry Henry 37 24 2 (3) 1 0 0 1 0 12 7 52 (3) 32 10 0
15 MF  ENG Ray Parlour 14 (5) 0 6 0 0 0 1 0 (2) 0 21 (7) 0 4 0
16 MF  NED Giovanni van Bronckhorst 9 (11) 1 3 (2) 0 1 0 0 0 2 (2) 0 15 (15) 1 2 0
17 MF  BRA Edu 12 (6) 2 5 (1) 1 0 0 1 0 1 (3) 0 19 (10) 3 5 0
18 DF  FRA Pascal Cygan 16 (2) 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 9 (2) 0 27 (4) 1 4 1
19 MF  BRA Gilberto Silva 32 (3) 0 1 (2) 0 0 0 (1) 1 11 (1) 2 44 (7) 3 1 0
21 MF  ENG Jermaine Pennant 1 (4) 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 (1) 0 2 (4) 3 0 0
22 DF  UKR Oleh Luzhny 11 (6) 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 3 (1) 0 17 (7) 0 3 0
23 DF  ENG Sol Campbell 33 2 5 1 0 0 1 0 10 0 49 3 4 2
24 GK  SWE Rami Shaaban 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 5 0 0 0
25 FW  NGR Kanu 10 (7) 5 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 (6) 1 14 (13) 6 0 0
26 DF  LAT Igors Stepanovs 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0
27 DF  GRE Efstathios Tavlaridis 0 (1) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 (1) 0 0 0
28 MF  CIV Kolo Touré 9 (17) 2 3 (2) 0 1 0 (1) 0 3 (4) 0 16 (24) 2 2 1
29 DF  GER Moritz Volz 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 (1) 0 0 0
30 FW  FRA Jérémie Aliadière (3) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (3) 1 0 0
39 MF  ENG David Bentley 0 0 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
40 MF  ENG Ryan Garry 1 0 0 0 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 1 (1) 0 0 0
45 DF  ENG Justin Hoyte (1) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
49 MF  DEN Sebastian Svärd 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

Source: [102]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Wenger's actual quote was: "It's not impossible. I know it will be difficult for us to go through the season unbeaten. But if we keep the right attitude it's possible we can do it."[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Winter, Henry (23 December 2001). "Arsenal pride comes after a fall". The Telegraph. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  2. ^ "Arsenal's road to glory". BBC Sport (BBC). 8 May 2002. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  3. ^ "Arsenal clinch Double". BBC Sport (BBC). 8 May 2002. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  4. ^ "Behind the Numbers: Scoring scoring Arsenal". Arsenal.com (Arsenal Football Club). 11 April 2012. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  5. ^ "Wenger hails 'shift of power'". BBC Sport (BBC). 9 May 2002. Retrieved 11 February 2010. "We wanted tonight to be a shift of power, and to take the trophy back to Highbury." 
  6. ^ Stammers, Steve (13 May 2002). "Wenger's French option". Evening Standard. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  7. ^ Lipton, Martin (21 September 2002). "We Won't Lose One Match". The Mirror. pp. 78–79. 
  8. ^ Day, Julia (19 April 2002). "Mm02 teams up with Gunners". guardian.co.uk. Retrieved 18 June 2012. 
  9. ^ "Vieira's Arsenal pledge". BBC Sport (BBC). 9 August 2002. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 
  10. ^ a b "Dixon bows out". BBC Sport (BBC). 11 May 2002. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  11. ^ a b "January's Premiership transfers in full". Staff and agencies (guardian.co.uk). 31 January 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  12. ^ "Cygan joins Arsenal". BBC Sport (BBC). 11 July 2002. Retrieved 8 June 2010. 
  13. ^ "Silva joins Arsenal". BBC Sport (BBC). 28 July 2002. Retrieved 8 June 2010. 
  14. ^ "Shaaban joins Arsenal". BBC Sport (BBC). 30 August 2002. Retrieved 29 April 2012. 
  15. ^ "Arsenal solve keeper crisis". BBC Sport (BBC). 31 January 2003. Retrieved 29 April 2012. 
  16. ^ Roach, Stuart (11 August 2002). "End of an Arsenal era". BBC Sport (BBC). Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  17. ^ "Manninger joins Espanyol". BBC Sport (BBC). 4 July 2002. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  18. ^ "Wright agrees Everton move". BBC Sport (BBC). 24 July 2002. Retrieved 8 June 2010. 
  19. ^ "Sidwell joins Reading". BBC Sport (BBC). 11 February 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  20. ^ "Birmingham sign Upson". BBC Sport (BBC). 11 February 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  21. ^ "Neuberg – Arsenal London 2:8 (1:2)". Österreichischer Rundfunk Sport. 26 July 2002. Archived from the original on 26 August 2002. Retrieved 25 February 2012. 
  22. ^ "SV Marsch Neuberg". Kovacs.heimat.eu. 26 July 2002. Retrieved 25 February 2012. 
  23. ^ Williams, Richard (12 August 2002). "Arsenal show undimmed taste for titles as Silva shines". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 18 June 2012. 
  24. ^ Taylor, Daniel (30 September 2002). "Wenger goes for total football domination". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  25. ^ Walker, Michael (19 August 2002). "Champions pick up where they left off". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  26. ^ Brodkin, Jon (26 August 2002). "Tenacity of Defoe rattles the aristocrats". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  27. ^ "Slick Arsenal crush Baggies". BBC Sport (BBC). 27 August 2002. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  28. ^ Brodkin, Jon (2 September 2002). "Wenger hails his '10 lions' after captain cries foul". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 15 June 2012. 
  29. ^ Brodkin, Jon (11 September 2002). "Henry sends Arsenal top". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 15 June 2012. 
  30. ^ Thomas, Russell (15 September 2002). "Arsenal aim to plant their standard on foreign fields". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 15 June 2012. 
  31. ^ "Arsenal sneak late win". BBC Sport (BBC). 21 September 2002. Retrieved 15 June 2012. 
  32. ^ a b Barclay, Patrick (29 September 2002). "Henry shears sheepish Leeds". The Sunday Telegraph (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  33. ^ "Arsenal blow away Leeds". BBC Sport (BBC). 28 September 2002. Retrieved 8 June 2010. 
  34. ^ "Wenger hails 'outstanding' Arsenal". BBC Sport (BBC). 29 September 2002. Retrieved 14 January 2009. 
  35. ^ Winter, Henry (30 September 2002). "Henry perfects one-track mind". The Telegraph. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  36. ^ Brodkin, Jon (7 October 2002). "Arsenal add another chapter to record book". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  37. ^ "Rooney ends Arsenal's run". BBC Sport (BBC). 19 October 2002. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  38. ^ Fifield, Dominic (21 October 2002). "Youngest goalscorer gets into the habit of wrecking records". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  39. ^ a b c Thomas, Russell (28 October 2002). "Arsenal play the beautiful game but get beaten again". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  40. ^ Lacey, David (4 November 2002). "Marlet gifts Arsenal the points in French farce". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  41. ^ "Arsenal ease past Newcastle". BBC Sport (BBC). 9 November 2002. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  42. ^ Lacey, David (11 November 2002). "Vieira drives Gunners back to top form". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 25 April 2010. 
  43. ^ "Arsenal rout Spurs". BBC Sport (BBC). 16 November 2002. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  44. ^ "Wonder goals of Arsenal's striker". Evening Standard (London). 26 November 2003. p. 70. 
  45. ^ Lacey, David (18 November 2002). "Henry beggars his neighbours". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  46. ^ Thomas, Russell (25 November 2002). "Saints desecrate Wenger's road to Rome". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  47. ^ Lacey, David (2 December 2002). "Arsenal salute new king as Henry claims a place in history". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  48. ^ a b c "Man Utd's surge continues". BBC Sport (BBC). 7 December 2002. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  49. ^ "Spurs let Arsenal off hook". BBC Sport (BBC). 15 December 2002. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  50. ^ Buckley, Will (22 December 2002). "Gunners hit target". The Observer (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  51. ^ "Arsenal punish Baggies". BBC Sport (BBC). 26 December 2002. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  52. ^ "Liverpool hold Arsenal". BBC Sport (BBC). 29 December 2002. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  53. ^ "Arsenal edge past Chelsea". BBC Sport (BBC). 1 January 2003. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  54. ^ "Arsenal brush Blues aside". BBC Sport (BBC). 12 January 2003. Retrieved 14 January 2009. 
  55. ^ McCarra, Kevin (13 January 2003). "Henry's name up in lights as champions turn on power". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  56. ^ "Henry destroys Hammers". BBC Sport (BBC). 19 January 2003. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  57. ^ McCarra, Kevin (30 January 2003). "Heskey heads off Gunners". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  58. ^ Lacey, David (3 February 2003). "Pires puts gold top on Gunners' slim pickings". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  59. ^ Spellman, Damian (10 February 2003). "Football: Angry Robson slams Bergkamp". The News Letter. Retrieved 18 June 2012.  (subscription required)
  60. ^ Taylor, Daniel (24 February 2003). "Arsenal force Ferguson to blink". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  61. ^ Taylor, Daniel (7 April 2003). "Wenger cannot hide Arsenal's anxiety as the title race is blown wide open". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  62. ^ Brodkin, Jon (3 March 2003). "Unstoppable Henry runs legs off Charlton". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  63. ^ Jain, Paul (4 March 2003). "Haul or nothing; Bookies write off United title bid". Daily Record (Glasgow). Retrieved 16 June 2012.  (subscription required)
  64. ^ "Arsenal undone by Blackburn". BBC Sport (BBC). 15 March 2003. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  65. ^ "Arsenal back on top". BBC Sport (BBC). 23 March 2003. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  66. ^ "Arsenal held by Villa". BBC Sport (BBC). 5 April 2003. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  67. ^ Brodkin, Jon; Fifield, Dominic (16 April 2003). "Winner takes all as titans collide". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  68. ^ a b c McCarra, Kevin (17 April 2003). "United on pole as Campbell sees red". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  69. ^ Walker, Michael (21 April 2003). "Arsenal's faith intact as Henry eases tension". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  70. ^ a b Barclay, Patrick (27 April 2003). "Wenger rues late lapses". The Sunday Telegraph. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  71. ^ "Man Utd close in on title". BBC Sport (BBC). 3 May 2003. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  72. ^ McCarra, Kevin (5 May 2003). "Viduka's arrow pierces Highbury heart". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  73. ^ Arsenal boss Arsène Wenger (Radio). London: BBC. 4 May 2003. 
  74. ^ "Arsenal hit Saints for six". BBC Sport (BBC). 7 May 2003. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  75. ^ "Ljungberg treble sinks Sunderland". BBC Sport (BBC). 11 May 2003. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  76. ^ a b "Premier League – 2002–03". Statto Organisation. Retrieved 24 December 2013. 
  77. ^ "Arsenal – 2002–03". Statto Organisation. Retrieved 24 December 2013. 
  78. ^ "Arsenal end Oxford dream". BBC Sport (BBC). 4 January 2003. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  79. ^ Burnton, Simon (6 January 2003). "Bergkamp worthy of ton of respect". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  80. ^ Bradley, Mark (9 January 2003). "Farnborough to switch cup tie". guardian.co.uk. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  81. ^ "Arsenal cruise through". BBC Sport (BBC). 25 January 2003. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  82. ^ "Arsenal cruise past Man Utd". BBC Sport (BBC). 16 February 2003. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  83. ^ Wilson, Paul (16 February 2003). "Arsenal triumph as Giggs goes missing". The Observer (London). Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  84. ^ "London giants collide". BBC Sport (BBC). 27 February 2003. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  85. ^ "Chelsea hold Arsenal". BBC Sport (BBC). 8 March 2003. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  86. ^ "Arsenal brush aside Chelsea". BBC Sport (BBC). 25 March 2003. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  87. ^ "Arsenal sink brave Blades". BBC Sport (BBC). 13 April 2003. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  88. ^ McCarra, Kevin (14 April 2003). "Super Seaman defies time and gravity to end Blades odyssey". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  89. ^ Wilson, Paul (18 May 2003). "Pires aim is true for muted Gunners". The Observer (London). Retrieved 23 June 2012. 
  90. ^ a b c "Keown hails 'best ever' win". BBC Sport (BBC). 17 May 2003. Retrieved 18 June 2012. 
  91. ^ "Black Cats stun Arsenal". BBC Sport (BBC). 6 November 2002. Retrieved 18 June 2012. 
  92. ^ Walker, Michael; Chaudhary, Vivek (30 August 2002). "United renew Bayer rivalry". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  93. ^ Brodkin, Jon (18 September 2002). "Ljungberg fires Gunners assault". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  94. ^ a b Brodkin, Jon (26 September 2002). "Quick Silva starts Arsenal goal rush". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  95. ^ Roach, Stuart (26 September 2002). "Arsenal's quick Silva". BBC Sport (BBC). Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  96. ^ "Auxerre stun Arsenal". BBC Sport (BBC). 22 October 2002. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  97. ^ a b Brodkin, Jon (31 October 2002). "Arsenal qualify with little celebration". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  98. ^ "Arsenal top Group". BBC Sport (BBC). 12 November 2002. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  99. ^ Lipton, Martin (28 November 2002). "Emperor of Rome; Roma 1 Arsenal 3: Henry rocks Italians with historic treble". Daily Mirror (London). Retrieved 23 May 2012.  (subscription required)
  100. ^ "Arsenal crash out in Valencia". BBC Sport (BBC). 19 March 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  101. ^ Arsenal FC - End of Season 2002/03 (DVD). Arsenal Football Club. 9 June 2003. ASIN B000096KG3. 
  102. ^ "Arsenal Squad Stats – 2002/03". ESPN Soccernet. Retrieved 17 June 2012.