2002 MN

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2002 MN
Discovery[1][2] and designation
Discovered by MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Discovery date June 17, 2002
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch JD 2454200.5 ( April 10, 2007)
Aphelion 2.7189 AU
Perihelion 0.9114 AU
Semi-major axis 1.8152 AU
Eccentricity 0.4979
Orbital period 893.3 d
Mean anomaly 3.9°
Inclination 1.0471°
Longitude of ascending node 85.1046°
Argument of perihelion 131.666°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ~73 meters (240 ft)[4]
Mass 5.4×108 kg
Absolute magnitude (H) 23.3

2002 MN is the provisional name given to a 73 meter-sized asteroid that on June 14, 2002 missed the Earth by only 75,000 miles (120,000 km), about one third the distance to the Moon (0.3 LD).[5] The close approach was second only to the Earth approach by the 10 meter-sized asteroid 1994 XM1.[5] 2002 MN was discovered on June 17, 2002 three days after closest approach.[1] Its mass and relative velocity were in the same general range as the object ascribed to the Tunguska event of 1908, which leveled over 800 square miles (2,100 km2) of trees in Siberia. 2002 MN has an observation arc of 53 days with an uncertainty parameter of 6.[3] There is a cumulative 1 in 208,000 chance that the asteroid could impact Earth sometime after 2070.[4] There is a 1 in 667,000 chance of impact on 15 June 2071.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MPEC 2002-M14 : 2002 MN". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2002-06-18. Retrieved 2013-01-24.  (K02M00N)
  2. ^ Asteroid's near-miss with Earth - 21 June 2002 - New Scientist
  3. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: (2002 MN)". 
  4. ^ a b c "Earth Impact Risk Summary: 2002 MN". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. Retrieved 2013-01-23. 
  5. ^ a b Don Yeomans (June 19, 2002). "Asteroid 2002 MN: Second Closest Asteroid Approach to Earth". NASA's Near Earth Object Program Office.