2003 American League Division Series

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2003 American League Division Series
2003ALDS.gif
Team (Wins) Manager Season
New York Yankees (3) Joe Torre 101–61, .623, GA: 6
Minnesota Twins (1) Ron Gardenhire 90–72, .556, GA: 4
Dates: September 30 – October 5
Television: ESPN (Games 1, 3, 4)
Fox (Game 2)
TV announcers: Jon Miller, Joe Morgan (Game 1)
Joe Buck, Tim McCarver (Game 2)
Chris Berman, Jeff Brantley, David Justice (Games 3–4)
Radio: ESPN
Radio announcers: Dan Shulman, Dave Campbell
Team (Wins) Manager Season
Boston Red Sox (3) Grady Little 95–67, .586, GB: 6
Oakland Athletics (2) Ken Macha 96–66, .593, GA: 3
Dates: October 1 – 6
Television: ESPN (Games 1, 4)
ESPN2 (Games 2–3)
Fox (Game 5)
TV announcers: Dave O'Brien, Jeff Brantley (Game 1)
Jon Miller, Joe Morgan (Games 2–4)
Thom Brennaman, Steve Lyons (Game 5)
Radio: ESPN
Radio announcers: John Rooney, Buck Martinez
Umpires: Ed Montague, Ted Barrett, Paul Emmel, Gerry Davis, Jim Joyce, Bill Welke (Yankees–Twins, Games 1–2; Red Sox–Athletics, Games 3–4)
Randy Marsh, Eric Cooper, Wally Bell, Gary Darling, Tim Welke, Greg Gibson (Red Sox–Athletics, Games 1–2 & 5; Yankees–Twins, Games 3–4)
 < 2002 ALDS 2004 > 
2003 ALCS 2003 World Series

The 2003 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2003 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, September 30, and ended on Monday, October 6, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

The higher seed (in parentheses) had the home field advantage (Games 1, 2 and 5 at home), which was determined by playing record. Although the team with the best record was normally intended to play the wild card team, the Yankees played the Twins, rather than the wild card Red Sox, because the Yankees and Red Sox are in the same division.

The Yankees and Red Sox went on to meet in the AL Championship Series, for the right to advance to the 2003 World Series against the National League champion Florida Marlins.

Matchups[edit]

New York Yankees vs. Minnesota Twins[edit]

New York won the series, 3–1.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance
1 September 30 Minnesota Twins – 3, New York Yankees – 1 Yankee Stadium (I) 3:18 56,292[1]
2 October 2 Minnesota Twins – 1, New York Yankees – 4 Yankee Stadium (I) 3:07 56,479[2] 
3 October 4 New York Yankees – 3, Minnesota Twins – 1 Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 3:02 55,915[3] 
4 October 5 New York Yankees – 8, Minnesota Twins – 1 Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 2:49 55,875[4]

Oakland Athletics vs. Boston Red Sox[edit]

Boston won the series, 3–2.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance
1 October 1 Boston Red Sox – 4, Oakland Athletics – 5 (12 innings) Network Associates Coliseum 4:37 50,606[5]
2 October 2 Boston Red Sox – 1, Oakland Athletics – 5 Network Associates Coliseum 2:37 36,305[6] 
3 October 4 Oakland Athletics – 1, Boston Red Sox – 3 (11 innings) Fenway Park 3:42 35,460[7] 
4 October 5 Oakland Athletics – 4, Boston Red Sox – 5 Fenway Park 3:02 35,048[8] 
5 October 6 Boston Red Sox – 4, Oakland Athletics – 3 Network Associates Coliseum 3:05 49,397[9]

New York vs. Minnesota[edit]

Game 1, September 30[edit]

Yankee Stadium (I) in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Minnesota 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 8 0
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 9 1
WP: LaTroy Hawkins (1–0)   LP: Mike Mussina (0–1)   Sv: Eddie Guardado (1)

Game 2, October 2[edit]

Yankee Stadium (I) in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Minnesota 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 1
New York 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 X 4 8 1
WP: Andy Pettitte (1–0)   LP: Brad Radke (0–1)   Sv: Mariano Rivera (1)
Home runs:
MIN: Torii Hunter (1)
NYY: None

Game 3, October 4[edit]

Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 8 1
Minnesota 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0
WP: Roger Clemens (1–0)   LP: Kyle Lohse (0–1)   Sv: Mariano Rivera (2)
Home runs:
NYY: Hideki Matsui (1)
MIN: A.J. Pierzynski (1)

Game 4, October 5[edit]

Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 1 1 8 13 0
Minnesota 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 1
WP: David Wells (1–0)   LP: Johan Santana (0–1)
Home runs:
NYY: Derek Jeter (1)
MIN: None

New York's victory secured their place in the American League Championship Series.

Composite box[edit]

2003 ALDS (3–1): New York Yankees over Minnesota Twins

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York Yankees 1 2 1 6 0 0 3 1 2 16 38 3
Minnesota Twins 0 0 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 6 26 2
Total attendance: 224,561   Average attendance: 56,140

Oakland vs. Boston[edit]

Game 1, October 1[edit]

Network Associates Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R H E
Boston 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 12 2
Oakland 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 5 8 0
WP: Rich Harden (1–0)   LP: Derek Lowe (0–1)
Home runs:
BOS: Todd Walker 2 (2), Jason Varitek (1)
OAK: None

After the Athletics tied the game 4–4 in the ninth inning on an RBI single by Erubiel Durazo, they won it in the twelfth when catcher Ramón Hernández laid down a two-out bunt single, scoring Eric Chavez from third base. Rich Harden was credited with the win, and Derek Lowe was credited with the loss. This was Oakland's ninth consecutive playoff win over Boston in the wake of ALCS sweeps in 1988 and 1990, breaking the record for consecutive playoff wins against one team set by the New York Yankees against the Chicago Cubs with World Series sweeps in 1932 and 1938. Incidentally, the Yankees nearly got a chance to extend that streak the same year.

Game 2, October 2[edit]

Network Associates Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Boston 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 1
Oakland 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 5 6 0
WP: Barry Zito (1–0)   LP: Tim Wakefield (0–1)

A five-run outburst in the second inning, capped off by a two-run throwing error by Todd Walker, was all the offense Oakland pitcher Barry Zito needed to claim the victory for the A's. Tim Wakefield was credited with the loss.

Game 3, October 4[edit]

Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 R H E
Oakland 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 4
Boston 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 7 2
WP: Scott Williamson (1–0)   LP: Rich Harden (1–1)
Home runs:
OAK: None
BOS: Trot Nixon (1)

Down 1–0 in the sixth inning, the Athletics had a potential rally stifled by controversial outs. Eric Byrnes was tagged out after failing to touch home plate after a collision with catcher Jason Varitek. Miguel Tejada was similarly retired after being obstructed by Bill Mueller while rounding third base. Obstruction was called by umpire Tim Welke. However time was not called by the umpire and Tejada stopped running thus giving the Red Sox time to tag him. [10] The one run scored in the inning sent the game into extra innings, where Boston won on a two-run walk-off home run by Trot Nixon. Scott Williamson was credited with the win, and Rich Harden was credited with the loss. This loss ended Oakland's playoff-record winning streak against the Red Sox at ten games, a record the Red Sox themselves would break in 2008 when they won their eleventh consecutive playoff game against the Angels.

Game 4, October 5[edit]

Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Oakland 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 11 1
Boston 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 X 5 7 0
WP: Scott Williamson (2–0)   LP: Keith Foulke (0–1)
Home runs:
OAK: Jermaine Dye (1)
BOS: Johnny Damon (1), Todd Walker (3)

After Oakland starter Tim Hudson left with a strained left oblique after only one inning, the A's bullpen held the Sox to only three runs over the next seven innings. With a 4–3 lead in the eighth inning, however, closer Keith Foulke gave up a game-winning two-RBI double to David Ortiz, scoring Nomar Garciaparra and Manny Ramírez. Scott Williamson was credited with the win.

Game 5, October 6[edit]

Network Associates Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Boston 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 6 0
Oakland 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 7 0
WP: Pedro Martínez (1–0)   LP: Barry Zito (1–1)   Sv: Derek Lowe (1)
Home runs:
BOS: Jason Varitek (2), Manny Ramírez (1)
OAK: None

The Red Sox rode a four-run sixth inning, highlighted by a three-run Manny Ramírez home run to complete their comeback from an 0–2 series deficit. Down by one run, the A's loaded the bases in the ninth inning, but failed to score as temporary closer Derek Lowe struck out Terrence Long looking. The win was marred by a violent collision between outfielder Johnny Damon and second baseman Damian Jackson. Damon was sent to the hospital where he was diagnosed with a concussion. Both starters factored into the decision, as Pedro Martínez was credited with the win, and Barry Zito was credited with the loss.

Boston's victory secured their place in the American League Championship Series while Oakland lost the ALDS after being up two games to none for the second time in three years.

Composite box[edit]

2003 ALDS (3–2): Boston Red Sox over Oakland Athletics

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R H E
Boston Red Sox 1 1 3 0 1 5 2 2 0 0 2 0 17 38 5
Oakland Athletics 0 6 3 1 0 5 0 1 1 0 0 1 18 38 5
Total attendance: 206,816   Average attendance: 41,363

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "2003 ALDS - Minnesota Twins vs. New York Yankees - Game 1". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  2. ^ "2003 ALDS - Minnesota Twins vs. New York Yankees - Game 2". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  3. ^ "2003 ALDS - New York Yankees vs. Minnesota Twins - Game 3". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  4. ^ "2003 ALDS - New York Yankees vs. Minnesota Twins - Game 4". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  5. ^ "2003 ALDS - Boston Red Sox vs. Oakland Athletics - Game 1". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  6. ^ "2003 ALDS - Boston Red Sox vs. Oakland Athletics - Game 2". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  7. ^ "2003 ALDS - Oakland Athletics vs. Boston Red Sox - Game 3". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  8. ^ "2003 ALDS - Oakland Athletics vs. Boston Red Sox - Game 4". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  9. ^ "2003 ALDS - Boston Red Sox vs. Oakland Athletics - Game 5". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  10. ^ The New York Times, sports page. Pete Thamel, published 10/5/2003 http://www.nytimes.com/2003/10/05/sports/baseball-absorbing-a-blow-and-delivering-one-in-dramatic-fashion.html

External links[edit]