2003 Iowa Hawkeyes football team

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2003 Iowa Hawkeyes football
Iowa logo.svg
Outback Bowl Champions
Outback Bowl, W 37–17 vs. Florida
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
Coaches #8
AP #8
2003 record 10–3 (5–3 Big Ten)
Head coach Kirk Ferentz[1]
Offensive coordinator Ken O'Keefe
Defensive coordinator Norm Parker
MVP Robert Gallery
Bob Sanders
Captain Robert Gallery
Howard Hodges
Nate Kaeding
Fred Russell
Bob Sanders
Home stadium Kinnick Stadium
(Capacity: 70,397)[2]
Seasons
« 2002 2004 »
2003 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
#6/7 Michigan   7 1         10 3  
#4/4 Ohio State   6 2         11 2  
#18/19 Purdue   6 2         9 4  
#8/8 Iowa   5 3         10 3  
#20/17 Minnesota   5 3         10 3  
Michigan State   5 3         8 5  
Wisconsin   4 4         7 6  
Northwestern   4 4         6 7  
Penn State   0* 7         0* 9  
Indiana   1 7         2 10  
Illinois   0 8         1 11  
† – BCS representative as champion
‡ – BCS at-large representative

The 2003 Iowa Hawkeyes football team represented the University of Iowa during the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. Following a 2002 season that saw the Hawkeyes finish 11–2 with a Big Ten Conference championship, expectations for a third straight bowl game were well warranted.[3] With four offensive starters and seven defensive starters returning from the 2002 season, the Hawkeyes looked to be a primarily defensive team going into the season.[3]

The Hawkeyes opened the season strong, winning games over Miami, Buffalo, Iowa State and Arizona State en route to a 4–0 record.[4] Undefeated and ranked ninth in the country, the Hawkeyes headed into East Lansing, Michigan for their Big Ten opener.[5] Playing a Michigan State Spartans team that had just beaten Notre Dame a week earlier, the Hawkeyes turned the ball over four times and committed ten penalties in a 20–10 loss.[5] However, with Michigan next up on the schedule, things would get no easier for the Hawkeyes. Before the game, Michigan held a 37–9–4 lead in the series between the two teams.[6]

Down by 14 in the first quarter for the second straight game,[7] the Hawkeyes came back to take a 30–20 lead midway through the fourth quarter. Michigan threatened the Iowa lead late, but the Hawkeyes held on for the 30–27 victory.[8] After the victory, Iowa lost on the road to Ohio State, but followed with home wins over Illinois and Penn State. With a loss to Purdue, Iowa's record was 7–3 with two regular season games remaining.[4] Playing against Minnesota and the Big Ten's top-ranked offense, the Hawkeyes scored 33 points before the Gophers scored a touchdown.[9]

Following the 40–22 victory, the Hawkeyes fell behind unranked Wisconsin 21–7 during the second quarter. Needing a pass deflection in the end zone by Sean Considine with no time remaining, the Hawkeyes scored 20 straight points and escaped with a 27–21 win and a 9–3 regular season record.[10] Playing in the 2004 Outback Bowl on January 1, 2004, the Hawkeyes won their first game in the state of Florida with a 37–17 victory over the Florida Gators. The win was also Iowa's first in the month of January since 1959.[11]

Previous season[edit]

Behind strong performances by quarterback Brad Banks, who finished second in the Heisman voting,[12] and the Hawkeye rushing defense, which finished fifth-best in the country,[3] Iowa finished 11–2 and shared the Big Ten championship with undefeated Ohio State.[13] Despite losses to Iowa State and Southern California, the Hawkeyes finished with an 8–0 conference record that included wins over Michigan and Penn State. Iowa's lopsided 34–9 victory over Michigan in Ann Arbor was Michigan's worst home loss since 1967.[14] The eleven wins are, to date, an Iowa record for wins in a single season.[1][15]

Before the season[edit]

Recruiting class[edit]

On National Signing Day, February 5, 2003, the Hawkeyes signed 22 players on football scholarships.[16]

Rankings[edit]

Entering the season, Iowa was unranked by both major polls.[17][18] However, the Hawkeyes would debut in the Coaches Poll as the 25th-ranked team before their first game against Miami University.[19]

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
August 30 11:00 AM Miami (OH)* Kinnick StadiumIowa City, IA ESPN2 W 21–3   54,128[20]
September 6 11:00 AM Buffalo* Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, IA ESPN+ W 56–7   54,471[20]
September 13 11:30 AM at Iowa State* #23[21] Jack Trice StadiumAmes, IA (Battle for the Cy-Hawk Trophy) FSN W 40–21   53,488[20]
September 20 5:00 PM #16[22] Arizona State* #18[22] Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, IA ESPN2 W 21–2   70,397[20]
September 27 11:00 AM at Michigan State #13[23] Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI ESPN+ L 20–10   72,276[20]
October 4 2:30 PM #9[24] Michigandagger #23[24] Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, IA ABC W 30–27   70,397[20]
October 18 2:30 PM at #8[25] Ohio State #9[25] Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH ABC L 10–19   105,044[20]
October 25 11:00 AM Penn State #16[26] Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, IA ABC W 26–14   70,397[20]
November 1 11:00 AM Illinois #13[27] Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, IA ESPN+ W 41–10   70,397[20]
November 8 2:30 PM at #16[28] Purdue #10[28] Ross–Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN ESPN L 27–14   60,058[20]
November 15 11:00 AM #19[29] Minnesota #20[29] Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, IA (Floyd of Rosedale) ESPN W 40–22   70,397[20]
November 22 2:30 PM at Wisconsin #17[30] Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI ABC W 27–21   79,931[20]
January 1 10:00 AM vs. #17[31] Florida* #13[31] Raymond James StadiumTampa, FL (Outback Bowl) ESPN W 37–17   65,372[20]
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from Coaches' Poll released prior to game. All times are in Central Time.

Game summaries[edit]

Miami (OH)[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Miami (OH) 3 0 0 0 3
• Iowa 7 7 0 7 21

[32]


Buffalo[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Buffalo 0 0 0 7 7
• Iowa 21 21 14 0 56

[33]


Iowa State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
• Iowa 10 10 13 7 40
Iowa St 7 0 0 14 21

[34]


Team players in the NFL[edit]

Player Position Round Pick NFL Club
Robert Gallery Tackle 1 2 Oakland Raiders
Chad Greenway Linebacker 1 17 Minnesota Vikings
Bob Sanders Free Safety 2 44 Indianapolis Colts
Matt Roth Defensive End 2 46 Miami Dolphins
Jonathan Babineaux Defensive Tackle 2 59 Atlanta Falcons
Nate Kaeding Kicker 3 65 San Diego Chargers
Abdul Hodge Linebacker 3 67 Green Bay Packers
Sean Considine Strong Safety 4 102 Philadelphia Eagles
Scott Chandler Tight End 4 129 San Diego Chargers
Jared Clauss Defensive Tackle 7 230 Tennessee Titans
Erik Jensen Tight End 7 237 St. Louis Rams

[35]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Kirk Ferentz". HawkeyeSports.com. Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved October 18, 2007. 
  2. ^ "Kinnick Stadium". HawkeyeSports.com. Archived from the original on October 17, 2007. Retrieved October 18, 2007. 
  3. ^ a b c "Iowa Hawkeyes 2003 Preview". SI.com. Retrieved October 18, 2007. 
  4. ^ a b "Iowa 2003 Football Schedule/Results". ESPN. Retrieved October 18, 2007. 
  5. ^ a b "Iowa vs. Michigan State". USA Today. September 27, 2003. Retrieved October 18, 2007. 
  6. ^ "Iowa Returns Home to Host Michigan on Homecoming". HawkeyeSports.com. September 29, 2003. Retrieved October 18, 2007. 
  7. ^ "No. 19 Iowa 30, No. 9 Michigan 27". HawkeyeSports.com. October 4, 2003. Retrieved October 19, 2007. 
  8. ^ "Michigan vs. Iowa". USA Today. October 4, 2003. Retrieved October 19, 2007. 
  9. ^ "Minnesota vs. Iowa". USA Today. November 15, 2003. Retrieved October 19, 2007. 
  10. ^ "Iowa vs. Wisconsin". USA Today. April 22, 2003. Retrieved October 19, 2003. 
  11. ^ "Iowa vs. Florida". USA Today. January 1, 2004. Retrieved October 19, 2007. 
  12. ^ "Brad Banks". HawkeyeSports.com. Retrieved October 19, 2007. 
  13. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Standings 2002". GoldFan.com. Archived from the original on November 22, 2007. Retrieved October 19, 2007. 
  14. ^ "Iowa Shines in Rare Romp". Chicago Sun-Times. October 27, 2002. Retrieved October 19, 2007. [dead link]
  15. ^ Logue, Andrew (November 17, 2002). "Iowa Completes Undefeated Big Ten Season". USA Today. Archived from the original on November 23, 2007. Retrieved October 19, 2007. 
  16. ^ "Brock Ita". Scout.com. Retrieved October 20, 2007. 
  17. ^ "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Preseason (August 17)". ESPN. August 17, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  18. ^ "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Preseason (August 17)". ESPN. August 17, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  19. ^ "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 1 (August 24)". ESPN. August 24, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "2003 Iowa Football Statistics - FINAL". Big Ten Conference. Retrieved October 12, 2011. 
  21. ^ "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 3 (September 7)". ESPN. September 7, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  22. ^ a b "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 4 (September 14)". ESPN. September 14, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  23. ^ "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 5 (September 21)". ESPN. September 21, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  24. ^ a b "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 6 (September 28)". ESPN. September 28, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  25. ^ a b "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 8 (October 12)". ESPN. October 12, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  26. ^ "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 9 (October 19)". ESPN. October 19, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  27. ^ "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 10 (October 26)". ESPN. October 26, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  28. ^ a b "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 11 (November 2)". ESPN. November 2, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  29. ^ a b "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 12 (November 9)". ESPN. November 9, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  30. ^ "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 13 (November 16)". ESPN. November 16, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  31. ^ a b "2003 NCAA Football Rankings - Week 15 (November 30)". ESPN. November 30, 2003. Retrieved October 26, 2007. 
  32. ^ ESPN
  33. ^ ESPN
  34. ^ ESPN
  35. ^ 2004 NFL Draft Listing | Pro-Football-Reference.com Archived 14 May 2009 at WebCite