2003 San Marino Grand Prix

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Italy  2003 San Marino Grand Prix
Race details
Race 4 of 16 in the 2003 Formula One season
Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari circuit configuration
Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari circuit configuration
Date April 20, 2003
Official name XXIII Grand Prix of San Marino
Location Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
Course Permanent racing facility
4.933 km (3.065 mi)
Distance 62 laps, 305.609 km (189.897 mi)
Weather Clear
Pole position
Driver Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari
Time 1:22.327
Fastest lap
Driver Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari
Time 1:22.491
Podium
First Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari
Second Finland Kimi Räikkönen McLaren-Mercedes
Third Brazil Rubens Barrichello Ferrari

The 2003 San Marino Grand Prix (formally the XXIII Grand Prix of San Marino) was a Formula One motor race held on April 20, 2003 at the Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola, Emilia-Romagna, Italy. It was the fourth round of the 2003 Formula One season The race, contested over 62 laps, was won by Ferrari driver Michael Schumacher for the Ferrari team after starting from pole position. Kimi Räikkönen, driving for McLaren, finished second with Rubens Barrichello third in the other Ferrari. The remaining points-scoring positions were filled by Ralf Schumacher (Williams), David Coulthard (McLaren), Fernando Alonso (Renault), Juan Pablo Montoya (Williams) and Jenson Button (BAR). Schumacher's victory for Ferrari was his and the team's first of the season.

Schumacher and his brother Ralf raced despite the death of their mother Elisabeth before the Grand Prix. The brothers led the field at the start with Ralf leading having overtaken Michael and held the lead until the first round of pit stops.

As a consequence of the race, Räikkönen increased his lead in the World Drivers' Championship, over team-mate David Coulthard to 13 points with Schumacher climbing to third. In the World Constructors Championship, McLaren increased their lead to 16 points with Ferrari overtaking Renault for second.

Report[edit]

Background[edit]

Heading into the fourth race of the season, McLaren driver Kimi Räikkönen was leading the World Drivers' Championship with 24 points, team-mate David Coulthard was second on 15 points, 9 points behind Räikkönen. Behind Räikkönen and Coulthard in the Drivers' Championship, Fernando Alonso was third on 14 points in a Renault, with Giancarlo Fisichella and Jarno Trulli on 10 and 9 points respectively. In the World Constructors' Championship, McLaren were leading on 39 points and Renault were second on 23 points, with Ferrari on 16 points.[1]

At the preceding Brazilian Grand Prix, confusion caused by a red flag at the end of the race led to Räikkönen being declared the winner. An investigation by Formula One's governing body the FIA in the days following the race proved that Fisichella had been the actual victor. The investigation discovered that Fisichella started his 56th lap when the red flag was shown and the results were rolled back to 54 laps.[2] Under the countback rule, the driver leading two laps before a race is stopped is declared the winner. During a meeting organised by the teams, the countback rule would be placed under review having highlighted potenial problems.[3] Fifteen minutes before the start of the first practice session, a ceremony was held in which Räikkönen and McLaren team principal Ron Dennis presented their winners' trophies to Fisichella and Jordan team principal Eddie Jordan.[4]

Prior to the race weekend, Williams announced a sponsorship deal with GlaxoSmithKline company NiQuitin CG. The sponsorship deal gained importance as it was announced during the period when tobacco sponsorship in Formula One became less prominent and marked the first time a Nicotine replacement therapy product was directly advertised on a Formula One car.[5] Formula One team principals and the directors of the Grand Prix World Championship held a meeting in Munich discussing the future shape framework of Formula One which resulted with the participants signing a memorandum to organise on key aspects of the Grand Prix World Championship, including the commercial and sporting structure of the series.[6] On April 17, the Formula One teams and the President of the FIA Max Mosley held a meeting at Imola to discuss the effect of new rule changes in the previous three races[7] after earlier criticism from the GPWC members.[8]

Ferrari originally planned to debut its new car the F2003-GA at Imola. However, issues with reliability led to the decision to race the F2002. Ferrari stated the F2002 was still a competitive car and believed racing the F2003-GA would be "risky"[9] despite testing the car at Mugello and Fiorano.[10]

Practice and qualifying[edit]

Three practice sessions were held before the race; the first was held from 11:00 to 12:00 local time on Friday, and two 45 minute timed sessions were also held on Saturday from 09:00 to 09:45 and 10:15 to 11:00 local time.[11] The Qualifying session was run as a one-lap session and took place on Friday and Saturday afternoon. The cars were run one at a time; the Friday running order was determined with the Championship leading heading out first. The Saturday running order was determined by times set in Friday afternoon qualifying with the fastest heading out last and the slowest running first. The lap times from the Friday afternoon session did not determine the grid order.[11]

Williams drivers Ralf Schumacher and Juan Pablo Montoya set the pace in the Friday free practice, which took place in dry and sunny conditions, with a time of 1:21.335. Montoya was less than sixth hundredths of a second behind, ahead of Jaguar driver Mark Webber, Coulthard, Alonso and BAR driver Jenson Button. Michael Schumacher clipped the kerb at the Variante Bassa chicane,[12] damaging the Ferrari's left rear suspension.[13]

In the Saturday afternoon qualifying session, Schumacher clinched his second pole position of the season with a time of 1:22.327. He was joined on the front row by his brother Ralf Schumacher, who was 14 thousands of a seconds behind. Rubens Barrichello was third in the other Ferrari, with Montoya fourth. Webber took fifth, with Räikkönen taking sixth. Minardi driver Jos Verstappen crashed into the wall at the Variane Alta chicane becoming the first driver to not set a competitive lap time under the new qualifying format.[14]

Race[edit]

The race took place in the afternoon and started at 14:00 local time, in dry and clear weather.[15] As usual, the race was broadcast worldwide, with the "World Feed" coverage being produced by host broadcaster RAI. Michael Schumacher, from pole position on the grid, lost the lead from Ralf Schumacher before the first corner. Webber, from fifth, made a poor start dropping down to eleventh. Räikkonen managed to gain one position for fifth with team-mate Coulthard making the best start and gained four places to go into eighth position.[16] Webber's team-mate Antonio Pizzonia stalled on the grid.[15] Trackside marshals pushed Pizzonia's car to the exit of the pitlane where Jaguar mechanics managed to restart the car's engine enabling Pizzonia rejoin at the back of the field.[17]

Post-race[edit]

Ralf and Michael Schumacher raced despite the death of their mother Elisabeth just hours before the race with the pair flying on a private jet to Cologne to be at her side.[18] They sported black armbands and no champagne was sprayed on the podium as a mark of respect.[19] Ralf also sported a black stripe on his racing helmet.[20] The Schumacher brothers left the circuit immediately after the podium celebrations and Ferrari team principal Jean Todt took Michael's place at the post-race press conference.[21] Race stewards Tony Scott-Andrews, Roger Peart and Giuseppe Musiconi formally excused the Schumacher brothers from the pre and post-race formalities.[22]

At the subsequent post-race press conference, Todt revealed that Schumacher made the decision to compete in the Grand Prix with Ferrari giving their full support to Schumacher.[23] Mercedes motorsport vice-president Norbert Haug expressed sympathy for the Schumacher brothers while also praising them for their performance during the race.[24]

As a consequence of the race, Räikkönen increased his lead in the World Drivers' Championship, over team-mate David Coulthard to 13 points with Schumacher climbing to third. In the World Constructors Championship, McLaren increased their lead to 16 points with Ferrari overtaking Renault for second.

Classification[edit]

Qualifying[edit]

Pos No Driver Constructor Q2 Time Gap
1 1 Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari 1:22.327
2 4 Germany Ralf Schumacher Williams-BMW 1:22.341 +0.014
3 2 Brazil Rubens Barrichello Ferrari 1:22.557 +0.230
4 3 Colombia Juan Pablo Montoya Williams-BMW 1:22.789 +0.462
5 14 Australia Mark Webber Jaguar-Cosworth 1:23.015 +0.688
6 6 Finland Kimi Räikkönen McLaren-Mercedes 1:23.148 +0.821
7 16 Canada Jacques Villeneuve BAR-Honda 1:23.160 +0.833
8 8 Spain Fernando Alonso Renault 1:23.169 +0.842
9 17 United Kingdom Jenson Button BAR-Honda 1:23.381 +1.054
10 20 France Olivier Panis Toyota 1:23.460 +1.133
11 9 Germany Nick Heidfeld Sauber-Petronas 1:23.700 +1.373
12 5 United Kingdom David Coulthard McLaren-Mercedes 1:23.818 +1.491
13 21 Brazil Cristiano da Matta Toyota 1:23.838 +1.511
14 10 Germany Heinz-Harald Frentzen Sauber-Petronas 1:23.932 +1.605
15 15 Brazil Antônio Pizzonia Jaguar-Cosworth 1:24.147 +1.820
16 7 Italy Jarno Trulli Renault 1:24.190 +1.863
17 11 Italy Giancarlo Fisichella Jordan-Ford 1:24.317 +1.990
18 18 United Kingdom Justin Wilson Minardi-Cosworth 1:25.826 +3.499
19 12 United Kingdom Ralph Firman Jordan-Ford 1:26.357 +4.030
20 19 Netherlands Jos Verstappen Minardi-Cosworth 2:01.007 +38.680
Sources:[25]

Race[edit]

Pos No Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 1 Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari 62 1:28:12.058 1 10
2 6 Finland Kimi Räikkönen McLaren-Mercedes 62 +1.882 6 8
3 2 Brazil Rubens Barrichello Ferrari 62 +2.291 3 6
4 4 Germany Ralf Schumacher Williams-BMW 62 +8.803 2 5
5 5 United Kingdom David Coulthard McLaren-Mercedes 62 +9.411 12 4
6 8 Spain Fernando Alonso Renault 62 +43.689 8 3
7 3 Colombia Juan Pablo Montoya Williams-BMW 62 +45.271 4 2
8 17 United Kingdom Jenson Button BAR-Honda 61 +1 Lap 9 1
9 20 France Olivier Panis Toyota 61 +1 Lap 10  
10 9 Germany Nick Heidfeld Sauber-Petronas 61 +1 Lap 11  
11 10 Germany Heinz-Harald Frentzen Sauber-Petronas 61 +1 Lap 14  
12 21 Brazil Cristiano da Matta Toyota 61 +1 Lap 13  
13 7 Italy Jarno Trulli Renault 61 +1 Lap 16  
14 15 Brazil Antônio Pizzonia Jaguar-Cosworth 60 +2 Laps 15  
15 11 Italy Giancarlo Fisichella Jordan-Ford 57 Engine 17  
Ret 14 Australia Mark Webber Jaguar-Cosworth 54 Driveshaft 5  
Ret 12 Republic of Ireland Ralph Firman Jordan-Ford 51 Oil line 19  
Ret 19 Netherlands Jos Verstappen Minardi-Cosworth 38 Electrical 20  
Ret 18 United Kingdom Justin Wilson Minardi-Cosworth 23 Fuel rig 18  
Ret 16 Canada Jacques Villeneuve BAR-Honda 19 Engine 7  
Sources:[26]

Standings after the race[edit]

  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for both sets of standings.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Edwards, Ben (2003). Formula 1: 2003 - Michael & Co. The Dream Team (DVD). Duke Video. ISBN 9780769737034. OCLC 60612199. 
  2. ^ "Fisichella declared winner of Brazilian GP". Sports Illustrated (Brendan Ripp). 11 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  3. ^ "F1 to review countback rule". BBC Sport (BBC). 11 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  4. ^ "Fisichella gets Brazil winner's trophy". formula1.com (Formula One World Championship Limited). 18 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  5. ^ Kleinman, Mark (17 April 2003). "NiQuitin CQ to sponsor BMW Williams F1 team". Marketing (Rogers Media Inc.). Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  6. ^ "F1 team bosses sign GPWC memorandum". GrandPrix.com. 10 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  7. ^ "The FIA and the teams get together". GrandPrix.com. 17 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  8. ^ "Car makers criticise F1 rule changes". BBC Sport (BBC). 17 January 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  9. ^ "Ferrari pushes back F2003 GA debut". GrandPrix.com. 12 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  10. ^ "Only one F2003-GA for Imola?". crash.net. 8 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  11. ^ a b "F1 Commission Decision". FIA. 28 October 2002. Archived from the original on 4 June 2004. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  12. ^ "Friday free practice review". formula1.com (Formula One World Championship Limited). 18 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  13. ^ Tremayne, David (19 April 2003). "Schumacher makes most of old Ferrari to shrug off cares". The Independent (Independent Print Limited). Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  14. ^ Benson, Andrew (20 April 2003). "Schumacher takes Imola pole". BBC Sport (BBC). Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  15. ^ a b "San Marino GP as it happened". BBC Sport (BBC). 20 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  16. ^ "Grand Prix Results: San Marino GP, 2003". GrandPrix.com. 20 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  17. ^ San Marino Grand Prix - Live (Television). Imola, Italy: ITV Sport (ITV). 20 April 2003. 
  18. ^ Williams, Richard (21 April 2003). "Schumacher mourns mother on winner's podium". The Guardian (Guardian Media Group). Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  19. ^ "Schumacher wins on emotional day". The Spokesman-Review (Cowles Publishing Company). 21 April 2003. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  20. ^ Benson, Andrew (20 April 2003). "Schumacher ends barren run". BBC Sport (BBC). Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  21. ^ "Schumachers Make Quick Exit". ITV-F1 (ITV Sport). 20 April 2003. Archived from the original on 21 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  22. ^ "Schumachers excused formalities after mother's death". formula1.com (Formula One World Championship Limited). 20 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  23. ^ "San Marino GP - Sunday - Race Notes". GrandPrix.com. 20 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  24. ^ "Schumacher wins San Marino GP after mother dies". Sports Illustrated (Brendan Ripp). 20 April 2003. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  25. ^ "2003 San Marino Grand Prix - Qualifying Results". formula1.com (Formula One World Championship Limited). Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  26. ^ "2003 San Marino Grand Prix - Race Results". formula1.com (Formula One World Championship Limited). Retrieved 5 May 2014. 


Previous race:
2003 Brazilian Grand Prix
FIA Formula One World Championship
2003 season
Next race:
2003 Spanish Grand Prix
Previous race:
2002 San Marino Grand Prix
San Marino Grand Prix Next race:
2004 San Marino Grand Prix

Coordinates: 44°20′38″N 11°43′00″E / 44.34389°N 11.71667°E / 44.34389; 11.71667