2004 Open Championship

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2004 Open Championship
Tournament information
Dates 15–18 July 2004
Location Troon, South Ayrshire, Scotland
Course(s) Royal Troon Golf Club,
Old Course
Tour(s) European Tour
PGA Tour
Japan Golf Tour
Statistics
Par 71[1]
Length 7,175 yards (6,561 m)[1]
Field 156 players, 73 after cut[1]
Cut 145 (+3)[1]
Prize fund £4,000,000
6,001,690
$7,490,400
Winner's share £720,000
€1,078,430
$1,348,272
Champion
United States Todd Hamilton
274 (−10), playoff
Troon is located in Scotland
Troon
Troon
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Location in Scotland
Troon is located in South Ayrshire
Troon
Troon
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Location in South Ayrshire, Scotland

The 2004 Open Championship was the 133rd Open Championship, held 15–18 July at the Old Course of Royal Troon Golf Club in Troon, Scotland.

Todd Hamilton won his only major championship, defeating 2002 champion Ernie Els by a stroke in a four-hole playoff.[2] Phil Mickelson finished third, followed by Lee Westwood in fourth.[3] Hamilton was the sixth consecutive American to win at Royal Troon.[4]

History of The Open Championship at Royal Troon[edit]

Royal Troon first hosted The Open Championship in 1923 and the 2004 Open was its eighth. Royal Troon's list of champions includes Arthur Havers (1923), 4-time Open winner Bobby Locke (1950), 7-time major winner Arnold Palmer (1962), Tom Weiskopf (1973), 5-time Open champion Tom Watson (1982), Mark Calcavecchia (1989), and Justin Leonard (1997).

Course[edit]

Main article: Royal Troon Golf Club

Old Course[5]

Hole Name Yards Par Hole Name Yards Par
1 Seal 370 4 10 Sandhills 438 4
2 Black Rock 391 4 11 The Railway 490 4
3 Gyaws 379 4 12 The Fox 431 4
4 Dunure 560 5 13 Burmah 472 4
5 Greenan 210 3 14 Alton 178 3
6 Turnberry 601 5 15 Crosbie 483 4
7 Tel-el-Kebir 405 4 16 Well 542 5
8 Postage Stamp 123 3 17 Rabbit 222 3
9 The Monk 423 4 18 Craigend 457 4
Out 3,462 36 In 3,713 35
Total 7,175 71

Lengths of the course for previous Opens (since 1950):[1]

  • 1997: 7,079 yards (6,473 m), par 71
  • 1989: 7,067 yards (6,462 m), par 72
  • 1982: 7,067 yards (6,462 m), par 72
  • 1973: 7,064 yards (6,459 m), par 72
  • 1962: 7,045 yards (6,442 m), par 72
  • 1950: 6,583 yards (6,019 m), par 70

Past champions in the field[edit]

Made the cut[edit]

Player Country Year won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Finish
Ernie Els  South Africa 2002 69 69 68 68 274 −10 2
Tiger Woods  United States 2000 70 71 68 72 281 −3 T9
Mark Calcavecchia  United States 1989 72 73 69 68 282 −2 T11
Justin Leonard  United States 1997 70 72 71 71 288 E T16
Mark O'Meara  United States 1998 71 74 68 75 288 +4 T30
Nick Price  Zimbabwe 1994 71 71 69 77 288 +4 T30
Sandy Lyle  Scotland 1985 70 73 81 79 303 +19 73

Missed the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 Total To par
John Daly  United States 1995 70 78 148 +6
Ben Curtis  United States 2003 75 74 149 +7
Greg Norman  Australia 1986, 1993 73 76 149 +7
Tom Lehman  United States 1996 73 78 151 +9
Nick Faldo  England 1987, 1990, 1992 76 77 153 +11
Paul Lawrie  Scotland 1999 78 77 155 +13
Tom Weiskopf  United States 1973 80 80 160 +18

Source:[6]

Round summaries[edit]

First round[edit]

Thursday, 15 July 2004

Paul Casey and Thomas Levet both carded 66 (−5) and held a two stroke lead over a group of nine players. The group at 3-under included amateur Stuart Wilson and Vijay Singh. Defending champ Ben Curtis carded a 75 (+4). In total there were 39 rounds under par, 25 of those being in the 60s. Home favourite Colin Montgomerie started with a 2-under 69.

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Paul Casey  England 66 −5
Thomas Levet  France
T3 K.J. Choi  South Korea 68 −3
Gary Evans  England
Kenneth Ferrie  England
Alastair Forsyth  Scotland
Mathew Goggin  Australia
Mårten Olander  Sweden
Carl Pettersson  Sweden
Vijay Singh  Fiji
Stuart Wilson (a)  England

Second round[edit]

Friday, 16 July 2004

Skip Kendall stormed into the lead with a 66 to reach the halfway stage at 135 (−7). Casey dropped down the leaderboard with a 77, while Levet shot a 70 to drop down into second. K.J. Choi continued his good start with a 69, keeping the him in a tie for third place with Barry Lane. Todd Hamilton finished the round with a 67 to move up into a tie for fifth place.

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Skip Kendall  United States 69-66=135 −7
2 Thomas Levet  France 66-70=136 −6
T3 K.J. Choi  South Korea 68-69=137 −5
Barry Lane  England 69-68=137
T5 Michael Campbell  New Zealand 67-71=138 −4
Ernie Els  South Africa 69-69=138
Todd Hamilton  United States 71-67=138
Colin Montgomerie  Scotland 69-69=138
Vijay Singh  Fiji 68-70=138
T10 Retief Goosen  South Africa 69-70=139 −3
Phil Mickelson  United States 73-66=139
Kenny Perry  United States 69-70=139
Scott Verplank  United States 69-70=139
Mike Weir  Canada 71-68=139

Amateurs: Wilson (+1), Campbell (+5), Tiley (+5), Flanagan (+6), McElhinney (+10).

Third round[edit]

Saturday, 17 July 2004

Hamilton surged up the leader with a second consecutive 67 to finish the day at 205 (−8). Ernie Els, the 2002 champion, moved up to second at 206 with a 68, while one shot behind lay the reigning Masters champion Phil Mickelson, Retief Goosen, and Thomas Levet at 207 (−6).

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Todd Hamilton  United States 71-67-67=205 −8
2 Ernie Els  South Africa 69-69-68=206 −7
T3 Retief Goosen  South Africa 69-70-68=207 −6
Thomas Levet  France 66-70-71=207
Phil Mickelson  United States 73-66-68=207
6 Barry Lane  England 69-68-71=208 −5
T7 Scott Verplank  United States 69-70-70=209 −4
Tiger Woods  United States 70-71-68=209
T9 Skip Kendall  United States 69-66-75=210 −3
Colin Montgomerie  Scotland 69-69-72=210
Mike Weir  Canada 71-68-71=210

Final round[edit]

Sunday, 18 July 2004

A see-saw final round led to a two man playoff between Hamilton and Els. Hamilton, playing in only his eighth major, looked like a sure bet to win after chipping in for birdie from 30 feet (9 m) on the par-3 14th to get to 10 under. Then he holed a 12-foot (4 m) birdie on the par-5 16th to keep his cushion. Els had to make birdies to keep up, and he came through with pure putts on the 16th and 17th. Then came the wild 72nd hole, with Hamilton holding a one shot lead. Hamilton pushed his iron off the tee and into the rough, then chopped it across the fairway next to a guard railing that restricted his swing. Els hit his approach to within the shadow of the flag, a 12-foot birdie attempt. Hamilton chipped to 20 feet (6 m) and missed to take bogey. Els suddenly had a putt to win, but left it short. Mickelson carded a final round 68 to finish a shot back at 275 (−9). A 67 moved Lee Westwood into sole fourth, matching Davis Love III for low score of the final round.

Place Player Country Score To par Money (£)
T1 Todd Hamilton  United States 71-67-67-69=274 −10 Playoff
Ernie Els  South Africa 69-69-68-68=274
3 Phil Mickelson  United States 73-66-68-68=275 −9 275,000
4 Lee Westwood  England 72-71-68-67=278 −6 210,000
T5 Thomas Levet  France 66-70-71-72=279 −5 159,500
Davis Love III  United States 72-69-71-67=279
T7 Retief Goosen  South Africa 69-70-68-73=280 −4 117,500
Scott Verplank  United States 69-70-70-71=280
T9 Mike Weir  Canada 71-68-71-71=281 −3 89,500
Tiger Woods  United States 70-71-68-72=281

Amateurs: Wilson (+12)
Source:[6]

Scorecard[edit]

Final round

Hole   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9    10   11   12   13  14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 4 4 5 3 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 5 3 4
United States Hamilton −8 −7 −7 −8 −9 −9 −9 −9 −9 −8 −9 −9 −9 −10 −10 −11 −11 −10
South Africa Els −7 −7 −8 −9 −8 −8 −9 −9 −9 −7 −7 −7 −8 −8 −8 −9 −10 −10
United States Mickelson −6 −6 −6 −8 −8 −8 −9 −9 −9 −9 −9 −9 −8 −8 −8 −9 −9 −9
England Westwood −2 −2 −1 −1 E −1 −2 −3 −3 −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −5 −5 −6
France Levet −6 −6 −6 −8 −8 −8 −8 −7 −7 −7 −7 −7 −7 −7 −6 −6 −5 −5
United States Love E E −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −5
South Africa Goosen −5 −5 −5 −6 −6 −6 −6 −6 −5 −5 −4 −4 −4 -4 −4 −4 −4 −4

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par
Source:[7]

Playoff[edit]

After 72 holes, Hamilton and Els were tied for the lead at 274 (−10), requiring a four-hole aggregate playoff, played over the 1st, 2nd, 17th, and 18th holes. (The first use of this format in The Open was fifteen years earlier in 1989, also at Royal Troon.) Both players parred the first two holes, both par fours, and Hamilton managed a par 3 on the 222-yard (203 m) 17th. Els overshot the green and bogeyed,[8] then parred the last, leaving Hamilton a par putt to win the Open, which he subsequently holed.[2][9] Els had all four rounds in the 60s for the second time in an Open without winning; the other time was at Royal St. George's in 1993.

Place Player Country Score To par Money (£)
1 Todd Hamilton  United States 15 E 720,000
2 Ernie Els  South Africa 16 +1 430,000
Scorecard[edit]
Hole   1     2    17   18 
Par 4 4 3 4
United States Hamilton E E E E
South Africa Els E E +1 +1

Cumulative playoff scores, relative to par

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Media guide". The Open Championship. 2011. p. 25, 203. Retrieved 2 July 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Ferguson, Doug (19 July 2004). "Unlikely winner captures British". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press. p. C-1. 
  3. ^ Bonk, Thomas (19 July 2004). "Hamilton's journey ends with major conquest". Eugene Register-Guard. (Los Angeles Times). p. E1. 
  4. ^ Bamberger, Michael (26 July 2004). "A horse for the gorse". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 
  5. ^ "The holes of Royal Troon". The Florida Times-Union. 14 July 2004. Retrieved 17 July 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "2004 Open Championship results". databasegolf.com. Retrieved 1 July 2012. 
  7. ^ "2004 Open Championship leaderboard". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 
  8. ^ "Hamilton wins Open Championship in playoff over Els". PGA of America. Associated Press. 18 July 2004. Retrieved 21 June 2012. 
  9. ^ Hodgetts, Rob (18 July 2004). "Hamilton grabs shock win". BBC Sport. Retrieved 21 June 2012. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2004 U.S. Open
Major Championships Succeeded by
2004 PGA Championship

Coordinates: 55°31′55″N 4°39′04″W / 55.532°N 4.651°W / 55.532; -4.651