2004 U.S. Open (golf)

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2004 U.S. Open
2004OpenLogo-1-.png
Tournament information
Dates June 17–20, 2004
Location Shinnecock Hills, New York
Course(s) Shinnecock Hills Golf Club
Tour(s) PGA Tour
European Tour
Japan Golf Tour
Statistics
Par 70
Length 6,996 yards (6,397 m)
Field 156 players, 66 after cut
Cut 146 (+6)
Prize fund $6,250,000
5,203,577
Winner's share $1,125,000
€936,644[1]
Champion
South Africa Retief Goosen
276 (–4)
Shinnecock   Hills GC    is located in United States
Shinnecock   Hills GC  
Shinnecock  
Hills GC  
Location in the United States

The 2004 United States Open Championship was the 104th U.S. Open, held June 17–20 at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in Shinnecock Hills, New York. Retief Goosen won his second U.S. Open title, two strokes ahead of runner-up Phil Mickelson.[2] The total purse was $6.25 million with a winner's share of $1.125 million.

Late on Sunday with windy conditions, Goosen birdied the 16th hole and Mickelson double-bogeyed the par-3 17th.[3] Goosen's previous U.S. Open win was in 2001 in a playoff at Southern Hills.

History of U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills[edit]

This was the fourth U.S. Open hosted by Shinnecock Hills. The former champions were James Foulis (1896), Raymond Floyd (1986) and Corey Pavin (1995). The second U.S. Open Championship was held at Shinnecock in 1896, but the course went 90 years before it hosted the tournament again. The 1986 U.S. Open was held on a completely revamped course. Floyd, age 43, found himself three shots back entering into the final round, and on a day where an under-par round was nearly impossible, he shot a final round 66 to win his fourth major. The conditions were almost the same in 1995, with no one scoring under par. Pavin played the final 10 holes in three-under-par on the way to a 68 and the win. He hit a memorable 4-wood to the 72nd green to within 5 feet (1.5 m).

Course layout[edit]

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total
Yards 393 226 478 435 537 474 189 398 443 3,573 412 158 468 370 443 403 540 179 450 3,423 6,996
Par 4 3 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 35 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 3 4 35 70

Source:[4]

Lengths of the course for previous major championships:

Past champions in the field[edit]

Made the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Finish
Retief Goosen  South Africa 2001 70 66 69 71 276 –4 1
Ernie Els  South Africa 1994, 1997 70 67 70 80 287 +7 T9
Tiger Woods  United States 2000, 2002 72 69 73 76 290 +10 T17
Corey Pavin  United States 1995 67 71 73 79 290 +10 T17
Lee Janzen  United States 1993, 1998 72 70 71 79 292 +12 T24
Jim Furyk  United States 2003 72 72 75 79 298 +18 T48
Tom Kite  United States 1992 72 71 75 84 302 +22 T57

Missed the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 Total To par
Raymond Floyd  United States 1986 75 75 150 +10

Round summaries[edit]

First round[edit]

Thursday, June 17, 2004

American Jay Haas led after one round, in a bid to become the oldest major champion in history. He was joined at the lead by Japan's Shigeki Maruyama and Argentina's Ángel Cabrera. Former Masters and PGA champion Vijay Singh shot a solid 68. Current Masters champion Phil Mickelson shot a 68 as well. Former U.S. Open champions Ernie Els and Retief Goosen shot an even-par 70 after rough starts. World Number 1 Tiger Woods struggled on Shinnecock's fast conditions and settled for a two-over-par 72. David Duval shot an 83, the worst round in the field, but was in high spirits afterwards.

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Ángel Cabrera  Argentina 66 –4
Jay Haas  United States
Shigeki Maruyama  Japan
4 Corey Pavin  United States 67 –3
T5 Kris Cox  United States 68 –2
Ben Curtis  United States
Steve Flesch  United States
Skip Kendall  United States
Jeff Maggert  United States
Phil Mickelson  United States
David Roesch  United States
Vijay Singh  Fiji
Kevin Stadler  United States

Second round[edit]

Friday, June 18, 2004

Phil Mickelson surged into the lead of the 104th U.S. Open trying to be the sixth man to win the first two majors of the year. He shot a blemish-free 66. He tied for the lead with Shigeki Maruyama who shot a 68 after a bogey on the 18th. Ernie Els had four consecutive birdies in a round of 67. American Jeff Maggert was in solo second at five-under-par with a 67. Fred Funk and Retief Goosen both shot 66 to tie for third. Ángel Cabrera had a crazy day after a 66 to shoot a 71. Former U.S. Open champion at Shinnecock Corey Pavin tied with Vijay Singh four back of the lead. Tiger Woods shot a 69 at one-over-par tied for 18th. World Number 4 Davis Love III missed the cut along with David Duval.

Jay Haas (E) and Bill Haas (+3) became only the second father/son pairing ever to make the cut in the same U.S. Open, and the first since Joe Kirkwood, Sr. and Joe Kirkwood, Jr. in 1948.

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Shigeki Maruyama  Japan 66-68=134 –6
Phil Mickelson  United States 68-66=134
3 Jeff Maggert  United States 68-67=135 –5
T4 Fred Funk  United States 70-66=136 –4
Retief Goosen  South Africa 70-66=136
T6 Ángel Cabrera  Argentina 66-71=137 –3
Ernie Els  South Africa 70-67=137
T8 Corey Pavin  United States 67-71=138 –2
Vijay Singh  Fiji 68-70=138
T10 Trevor Immelman  South Africa 69-70=139 –1
Mike Weir  Canada 69-70=138

Amateurs: Levin (+2), Wittenberg (+2), Haas (+5), Reavie (+5), Mackenzie (+9), Smith (+9), Flanagan (+14), Álvarez (+18).

Third round[edit]

Saturday, June 19, 2004

Former champion Retief Goosen battled his way into a two-shot lead in the U.S. Open third round on Saturday as Shinnecock Hills presented its stiffest test of the week. He held his nerve in challenging conditions to card a one-under-par 69 for a five-under total of 205. He was one of only three players to return sub-par rounds. Second round leader Phil Mickelson bogeyed the last two holes for a share of second place with two time Open champion Ernie Els. Fred Funk and Shigeki Maruyama both had crazy days, finishing poorly for a tie for fourth. Jeff Maggert after a poor round of 74 was tied with Tim Clark in sixth place. Tim Clark had a low round of 66, the best of the day. Tiger Woods shot a 73 and Vijay Singh shot a 77.

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Retief Goosen  South Africa 70-66-69=205 –5
T2 Ernie Els  South Africa 70-67-70=207 –3
Phil Mickelson  United States 68-66-73=207
T4 Fred Funk  United States 70-66-72=208 –2
Shigeki Maruyama  Japan 66-68-74=208
T6 Tim Clark  South Africa 73-70-66=209 –1
Jeff Maggert  United States 68-67-74=209
8 Mike Weir  Canada 69-70-71=210 E
T9 Sergio García  Spain 72-68-71=211 +1
Corey Pavin  United States 67-71-73=211

Fourth round[edit]

Sunday, June 20, 2004

South Africa's Retief Goosen held his nerve to clinch the U.S. Open for a second time, edging out Phil Mickelson by two shots with a closing one-over-par 71 on Sunday to finish at four-under 276. Conditions were brutal on the final day when the average final-round score was 78.7 and not a single golfer finished their round under par. Mickelson, urged on by raucous New York galleries on a windswept and sunny afternoon, completed a matching 71 for his third runner-up spot in the last six U.S. Opens. Goosen led by two going into the final day but was overhauled by Mickelson over the closing stretch, the left-handed American moving one stroke clear with back-to-back birdies on 15 and 16. But Mickelson, bidding to become the sixth player to win the first two majors of the year, immediately fell back, running up a double-bogey at the par-three 17th after three-putting from five feet. Goosen, playing in the group behind, restored his two-shot advantage with a 12-foot birdie putt on 16 and parred the final two holes to seal the title.[5]

American Jeff Maggert finished third at one-over 281 after carding a 72, while 2003 Mike Weir (74) of Canada and Japan's Shigeki Maruyama (76) were a further three shots back in a tie for fourth. However world number two Ernie Els, joint second overnight with Mickelson, produced four double-bogeys on his way to an 80, his worst score in a U.S. Open, and a tie for ninth at seven over. World number one Tiger Woods, who began nine shots off the lead, battled to a six-over 76 and a share of 17th. A mix of five bogeys, a double-bogey and a birdie at the last left him at 10-over 290 as he narrowly avoided returning his worst round at a U.S. Open. His career high was a 77 in the third round at Oakland Hills playing as an amateur in 1996. Australia's Robert Allenby was the only player to return a level-par 70 on Sunday, three birdies and three bogeys lifting him into a tie for seventh with American Steve Flesch at six-over 286. Fred Funk (77) of the U.S. was alone in sixth on 285.

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
1 Retief Goosen  South Africa 70-66-69-71=276 –4 1,125,000
2 Phil Mickelson  United States 68-66-73-71=278 –2 675,000
3 Jeff Maggert  United States 68-67-74-72=281 +1 424,604
T4 Shigeki Maruyama  Japan 66-68-74-76=284 +4 267,756
Mike Weir  Canada 69-70-71-74=284
6 Fred Funk  United States 70-66-72-77=285 +5 212,444
T7 Robert Allenby  Australia 70-72-74-70=286 +6 183,828
Steve Flesch  United States 68-74-70-74=286
T9 Stephen Ames  Canada 74-66-73-74=287 +7 145,282
Chris DiMarco  United States 71-71-70-75=287
Ernie Els  South Africa 70-67-70-80=287
Jay Haas  United States 66-74-76-71=287

Amateurs: Spencer Levin (+8), Casey Wittenberg (+16), Bill Haas (+17), Chez Reavie (+24)[6]

Scorecard[edit]

Hole  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 3 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 3 4
South Africa Goosen –6 –5 –5 –5 –5 –5 –5 –4 –4 –3 –4 –4 –4 –3 –3 –4 –4 –4
United States Mickelson –3 –3 –2 –3 –3 –3 –3 –3 –3 –2 –2 –1 –2 –2 –3 –4 –2 –2
United States Maggert –2 –1 –1 E –1 –1 –1 +1 E +1 +1 +1 E E +1 +1 E +1
South Africa Els –1 –1 –2 –1 E E +1 +3 +3 +5 +4 +4 +5 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7

Source:[6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "U.S. Open Championship: leaderboard". European Tour. June 20, 2004. Retrieved June 14, 2012. 
  2. ^ "U.S. Open history: 2004". USGA. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  3. ^ Shipnuck, Alan (June 28, 2004). "Wild Goose Chase". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved May 15, 2013. 
  4. ^ "2004 U.S. Open". ESPN. June 20, 2004. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  5. ^ Brown, Clifton (June 21, 2004). "Mickelson bears major setback". Eugene Register-Guard. (New York Times). p. E1. 
  6. ^ a b "2004 U.S. Open: leaderboard". Yahoo Sports. June 14, 2012. 
  7. ^ "2004 U.S. Open leaderboard". ESPN. June 20, 2004. Retrieved May 26, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2004 Masters
Major Championships Succeeded by
2004 Open Championship

Coordinates: 40°53′38″N 72°26′24″W / 40.894°N 72.440°W / 40.894; -72.440