2005 Giro d'Italia

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2005 Giro d'Italia
Map of Italy showing the path of the race, going counter-clockwise from Reggio di Calabria to the finish in Milan
Overview of the stages:
route from Reggio di Calabria to Milan covered by the riders on the bicycle (red)
and distances between stages (green).
Race details
Dates 7 – 29 May
Stages 20 + Prologue
Distance 3,447.15 km (2,142 mi)
Winning time 91h 25’ 51” (37.37 km/h or 23.22 mph)
Palmares
Winner  Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) (Discovery Channel)
Second  Gilberto Simoni (ITA) (Lampre-Caffita)
Third  José Rujano (VEN) (Colombia-Selle Italia)

Points  Paolo Bettini (ITA) (Quick Step-Innergetic)
Mountains  José Rujano (VEN) (Colombia-Selle Italia)
Intergiro  Stefano Zanini (ITA) (Quick Step-Innergetic)
Team Liquigas-Bianchi
Team Points Davitamon-Lotto
2004
2006

The 2005 Giro d'Italia was the 88th edition of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours. The Giro began in Reggio Calabria with a 1.15 km (0.7 mi) prologue. The race came to a close with a 119 km (73.9 mi) mass-start road stage that stretched from Albese con Cassano to Milan. Twenty two teams entered the race that was won by the Italian Paolo Savoldelli of the Discovery Channel team.[1] Second and third were the Italian Gilberto Simoni and Venezuelan José Rujano.[1]

Five riders led the race over eight occasions before Savoldelli gained the lead after the Giro's thirteenth stage.[2][3] The Giro was first led by Australian Brett Lancaster, who won the race's opening prologue.[4] He lost the lead the next day to Paolo Bettini,[5] who gained the race lead three separate times before Savoldelli took over.[3] Ivan Basso was the leader of the race for two days, before he lost the lead to Savoldelli who then held that lead until the race's conclusion.[3]

Having previously won the general classification in 2002, Savoldelli became the nineteenth rider to repeat as winner of the Giro d'Italia.[1] Amongst the other classifications that the race awarded, Paolo Bettini of the Quick Step-Innergetic team won the points classification, Selle Italia Colombia rider José Rujano won the mountains classification, and Italian Stefano Zanini won the intergiro classification.[1] Liquigas-Bianchi finished as the winners of the Trofeo Fast Team classification, ranking each of the twenty-two teams contesting the race by lowest cumulative time.[1] The other team classification, the Trofeo Super Team classification, where the teams' riders are awarded points for placing within the top twenty in each stage and the points are then totaled for each team was won by Davitamon-Lotto.[1]

Teams[edit]

Twenty-two teams were invited by the race organizers to participate in the 2005 edition of the Giro d'Italia.[6] Twenty of the teams were UCI ProTour teams, while Ceramica Panaria-Navigare and Colombia-Selle Italia were wild card teams invited by the organizers. Each team sent a squad of nine riders, which meant that the race started with a peloton of 198 cyclists.[6] From the riders that began the race, 153 made it to the finish in Milan.[1]

The teams entering the race were:[6][7]

Route and stages[edit]

A mountain town in the distance.
The town of Urtijëi hosted the end of the 218 km (135 mi) thirteenth stage, which was classified as a summit finish.

The route for the 2005 Giro d'Italia was unveiled by race director Angelo Zomegnan on 23 January 2005 in Milan.[8] It contained three time trial events, all of which were individual.[9] The organizers divided the remaining eighteen stages into three categories: flat stages, medium mountain stages, and mountain stages.[9] Ten of the stages were declared flat stages.[9] Of the eight stages remaining, three stages were designated medium mountain stages and five were ranked as mountain stages.[9] In the stages containing categorized climbs, four had summit finishes: stage 11, to Zoldo Alto;[10][11] stage 13, to Urtijëi;[2][12] stage 17, to Colle di Tenda;[13][14] and stage 19, to Sestriere.[15][16] The organizers chose to include one rest day. When compared to the previous year's race, the race was 23.25 km (14 mi) longer, contained one less rest day, and one more individual time trial event. In addition, both races contained a prologue to open the race.

The fifteenth was originally intended to be 205 km (127 mi) and to start in Livigno.[9][17] However, due to very poor weather conditions the start was moved to Villa di Tirano, and the stage was shortened to 154 km (96 mi).[17] The route originally had the riders crossing the Forcola di Livigno, a mountain located 10 km (6 mi) outside of the original start in Livigno, but due to the bad weather at the base and top of the climb the organizers were forced to exclude the pass.[17]

Stage characteristics and winners[9][18]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
P 7 May Reggio Calabria 1.15 km (1 mi) Individual time trial  Brett Lancaster (AUS)
1 8 May Reggio Calabria to Tropea 208 km (129 mi) Flat stage  Paolo Bettini (ITA)
2 9 May Catanzaro Lido to Santa Maria del Cedro 182 km (113 mi) Flat stage  Robbie McEwen (AUS)
3 10 May Diamante to Giffoni Valle Piana 205 km (127 mi) Flat stage  Danilo Di Luca (ITA)
4 11 May Giffoni Valle Piana to Frosinone 211 km (131 mi) Flat stage  Luca Mazzanti (ITA)
5 12 May Celano to L'Aquila 223 km (139 mi) Medium mountain stage  Danilo Di Luca (ITA)
6 13 May Viterbo to Marina di Grosseto 153 km (95 mi) Flat stage  Robbie McEwen (AUS)
7 14 May Grosseto to Pistoia 211 km (131 mi) Medium mountain stage  Koldo Gil (ESP)
8 15 May Lamporecchio to Florence 45 km (28 mi) Individual time trial  David Zabriskie (USA)
9 16 May Florence to Ravenna 139 km (86 mi) Flat stage  Alessandro Petacchi (ITA)
17 May Rest day
10 18 May Ravenna to Rossano Veneto 212 km (132 mi) Flat stage  Robbie McEwen (AUS)
11 19 May Marostica to Zoldo Alto 150 km (93 mi) Mountain stage  Paolo Savoldelli (ITA)
12 20 May Alleghe to Rovereto 178 km (111 mi) Medium mountain stage  Alessandro Petacchi (ITA)
13 21 May Mezzocorona to Urtijëi 218 km (135 mi) Mountain stage  Iván Parra (COL)
14 22 May Neumarkt to Livigno 210 km (130 mi) Mountain stage  Iván Parra (COL)
15 23 May Villa di Tirano to Lissone 154 km (96 mi) Flat stage  Alessandro Petacchi (ITA)
24 May Rest day
16 25 May Lissone to Varazze 210 km (130 mi) Flat stage  Christophe Le Mével (FRA)
17 26 May Varazze to Limone Piemonte 194 km (121 mi) Mountain stage  Ivan Basso (ITA)
18 27 May Chieri to Turin 34 km (21 mi) Individual time trial  Ivan Basso (ITA)
19 28 May Savigliano to Sestriere 190 km (118 mi) Mountain stage  José Rujano (VEN)
20 29 May Albese con Cassano to Milan 119 km (74 mi) Flat stage  Alessandro Petacchi (ITA)
Total 3,447.15 km (2,142 mi)

Race overview[edit]

A cyclist spraying champagne into the crowd.
Koldo Gil on the winner's podium after winning the seventh stage into Pistoia.

The Giro began with a 1.15 km (0.7 mi) prologue that navigated through the streets of Reggio Calabria.[4] The event was won by Australian Brett Lancaster who won by a .289 second margin over the second placed rider Matteo Tosatto.[4] After the last competing rider took the course, famed sprinter Mario Cipollini took the course for a final farewell after announcing his retirement ten days beforehand.[4] The Giro's first stage came down to an uphill, bunch sprint that Paolo Bettini managed to win.[5] Along with the stage victory, Bettini took the overall lead of the race.[5] The second stage ended in another sprint finish, which Robbie McEwen won and also saw him take the race lead.[19] Stage 3 saw a breakaway go the distance as a group of fifty riders broke free about 30 km (18.6 mi) from the finish.[20] Liquigas-Bianchi's Danilo Di Luca lunged ahead of Damiano Cunego to win the stage, while the race lead fell back into Bettini's hands.[20] The fourth stage closed with a sprint finish that Italian Paolo Bettini won.[21] However, Bettini was later disqualified after the judges saw that he caused fellow sprinter Baden Cooke to fall, which gave the stage victory to second place finisher Luca Mazzanti.[21]

The seventh stage saw a breakaway succeed again, as Liberty Seguros-Würth rider Koldo Gil took the downhill stage win.[22] Danilo Di Luca regained the lead of the race as the time gaps widened due to the climb that was placed shortly before the finish.[22] Stage eight was a 45 km (28 mi) individual time trial that was won by American David Zabriskie.[23] Di Luca managed to place tenth overall and maintain the race leader's pink jersey, while the general classification contenders Ivan Basso and Paolo Savoldelli gained valuable seconds over Di Luca.[23] Alessandro Petacchi won the next stage by means of a bunch sprint, while the general classification remained largely unaltered.[24] Stage 10 took place after a rest day.[25] The stage again came down to a bunch sprint that was won by Australian Robbie McKewen, who captured his second stage win of the Giro.[25]

A man riding in a time trial
Then race leader Danilo di Luca riding during the stage 8 individual time trial.

Stage 11 was the first big mountain stage of the 2005 Giro d'Italia and it began with a breakaway that was eventually swept after the first climb of the day.[10] Ivan Basso attacked with 26 km (16 mi) remaining in the stage and only Paolo Savoldelli was able to keep pace with him.[10] The two raced to the top of the Zoldo Alto and Savoldelli won the sprint to the line, while Basso claimed the race lead.[10] The twelfth stage of the race was downhill after the lone categorized climb of the Passo san Pellegrino.[26] The stage ultimately came down to a field sprint, which Alessandro Petacchi won.[26] The Giro's thirteenth stage saw a breakaway succeed as Colombian Iván Parra beat out his fellow breakaway members for the stage win.[2] Paolo Savoldelli claimed the overall lead after Ivan Basso lost over a minute as he was suffering from a gastric problem.[2] The next stage, stage 14, contained the Cima Coppi of the 2005 Giro d'Italia, the Passo dello Stelvio, along with other climbs of lesser severity.[27] Iván Parra struck again by winning the stage by almost two minutes over the second place finisher.[27] Ivan Basso lost even more time due to his illness, while general classification contenders Danilo Di Luca and Gilberto Simoni gained valuable seconds over the race leader Paolo Savoldelli.[27]

The fifteenth stage's start was moved from Livigno to Villa di Tirano and the route was shortened by 51 km (32 mi) due to poor weather conditions on the stage's first scheduled mountain pass, the Forcola di Livigno.[17] With the exclusion of the uphill earlier portion of the stage, the route was relatively flat which led to the stage ending in a bunch sprint that Fassa Bortolo's Alessandro Petacchi won.[17] After the second rest day, the riders began stage sixteen of the Giro.[28] A breakaway containing eighteen men got away from the peloton and managed to stay away for the length of the stage.[28] Christophe Le Mével out-sprinted his fellow breakaway members to win the stage and earn his first professional victory.[28] The race's seventeenth stage contained a summit finish on the Colle di Tenda.[13] While on the final climb of the day, the race was headed by a lead group that contained the race leader Paolo Savoldelli and general classification favorites Ivan Basso and José Rujano.[13] Basso managed to slip away with 6 km (4 mi) left to go in the climb and win the stage.[13]

A cyclist wearing a purple jersey.
Paolo Bettini wearing the purple jsery as leader of points classification while climbing the Colle di Tenda during stage 17.

Stage 18 was an individual time trial that stretched 34 km (21 mi) Chieri to Turin.[29] Team CSC's Ivan Basso won the stage by nine seconds over Russian Vladimir Karpets.[29] The penultimate stage of the Giro featured a summit finish on the fabled Sestriere.[15] The race leader Paolo Savoldelli was in trouble throughout the stage and his lead was in jeopardy.[15] However, on the final climb of the Sestriere he received aid from two riders and made it to the finish two minutes after the stage winner José Rujano.[15] Savoldelli's lead shrank to twenty-eight seconds over the second placed rider Gilberto Simoni.[15] The twentieth and final stage of the 2005 Giro d'Italia came ended with a bunch sprint in the streets of Milan.[1] Italian Alessandro Petacchi edged out Erik Zabel and Robert Förster to win the stage.[1] Savoldelli won his second Giro d'Italia after crossing the finish in 24th place on the stage.[1]

Success in stages was limited to ten of the competing teams, six of which achieved multiple stage victories, while five individual riders won multiple stages. The riders that won more than once were Robbie McEwen in stages 2,[19] 6,[30] 10,[25] Danilo di Luca in stages 3[20] and 5,[31] Alessandro Petacchi in stages 9,[24] 12,[26] 15,[17] and 20,[1] and Iván Parra in stages 13[2] and 14,[27] and Ivan Basso in stages 17[13] and 18.[29] Ceramica Panaria-Navigare won two stages, with Brett Lancaster in the prologue[4] and Luca Mazzanti in stage 4.[21] Davitamon-Lotto won three stages with Robbie McEwen. Liquigas-Bianchi won two stages with Danilo di Luca. Team CSC won three stages, with the David Zabriskie in the stage 8[23] time trial and two stages with Ivan Basso. Fassa Bortolo won four stages with Alessandro Petacchi. Colombia-Selle Italia won three stages, with Iván Parra in two stages and José Rujano in stage 19.[15] Quick Step-Innergetic, Liberty Seguros-Würth, Discovery Channel, and Crédit Agricole each won one stage at the Giro d'Italia. Quick Step-Innergetic's Paolo Bettini won stage 1 by out-sprinting the rest of the field.[5] Liberty Seguros-Würth rider Koldo Gil won stage 7 by means of a long breakaway.[22] Discovery Channel's Paolo Savoldelli won stage 11[10] through a last second attack, as did Crédit Agricole rider Christophe Le Mével in stage 16.[28]

Classification leadership[edit]

A mountain pass in a bike race.
The summit of the Passo dello Stelvio, the Cima Coppi for the 2005 Giro, with a banner indicating the top of the climb.

Four different jerseys were worn during the 2005 Giro d'Italia. The leader of the general classification – calculated by adding the stage finish times of each rider, and allowing time bonuses for the first three finishers on mass-start stages – wore a pink jersey. This classification is the most important of the race, and its winner is considered as the winner of the Giro.[32]

For the points classification, which awarded a purple (or cyclamen) jersey to its leader, cyclists were given points for finishing a stage in the top 15; additional points could also be won in intermediate sprints. The green jersey was awarded to the mountains classification leader. In this ranking, points were won by reaching the summit of a climb ahead of other cyclists. Each climb was ranked as either first, second or third category, with more points available for higher category climbs. The Cima Coppi, the race's highest point of elevation, awarded more points than the other first category climbs.[32] The Cima Coppi for this Giro was the Passo dello Stelvio. The first rider to cross the Stelvio was Selle Italia Colombia's José Rujano.[27] The intergiro classification was marked by a blue jersey.[32][33] The calculation for the intergiro is similar to that of the general classification, in each stage there is a midway point that the riders pass through a point and where their time is stopped. As the race goes on, their times compiled and the person with the lowest time is the leader of the intergiro classification and wears the blue jersey.[32] Although no jersey was awarded, there was also one classification for the teams, in which the stage finish times of the best three cyclists per team were added; the leading team was the one with the lowest total time.[32][32][33]

There were also two classification for the teams. The classification was the Trofeo Fast Team. In this classification, the times of the best three cyclists per team on each stage were added; the leading team was the team with the lowest total time; the Trofeo Super Team was a team points classification, with the top 20 placed riders on each stage earning points (20 for first place, 19 for second place and so on, down to a single point for 20th) for their team.[32]

The rows in the following table correspond to the jerseys awarded after that stage was run.

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
Points classification
Mountains classification
Intergiro classification
Trofeo Fast Team Trofeo Super Team
P Brett Lancaster Brett Lancaster not awarded not awarded not awarded Fassa Bortolo not awarded
1 Paolo Bettini Paolo Bettini Paolo Bettini Thorwald Veneberg Sven Krauß Liquigas-Bianchi Davitamon-Lotto
2 Robbie McEwen Robbie McEwen Robbie McEwen
3 Danilo di Luca Paolo Bettini Dario Cioni Liquigas-Bianchi
4 Luca Mazzanti Paolo Bettini
5 Danilo di Luca Danilo di Luca Danilo di Luca José Rujano
6 Robbie McEwen Paolo Bettini Robbie McEwen Davitamon-Lotto
7 Koldo Gil Danilo di Luca Danilo di Luca Koldo Gil Lampre-Caffita Liquigas-Bianchi
8 David Zabriskie Liquigas-Bianchi
9 Alessandro Petacchi
10 Robbie McEwen Robbie McEwen Davitamon-Lotto
11 Paolo Savoldelli Ivan Basso José Rujano
12 Alessandro Petacchi
13 Iván Parra Paolo Savoldelli Paolo Bettini
14 Iván Parra Danilo di Luca Liquigas-Bianchi
15 Alessandro Petacchi Paolo Bettini Paolo Bettini Davitamon-Lotto
16 Christophe Le Mével
17 Ivan Basso Stefano Zanini
18 Ivan Basso
19 José Rujano
20 Alessandro Petacchi
Final Paolo Savoldelli Paolo Bettini José Rujano Stefano Zanini Liquigas-Bianchi Davitamon-Lotto

Final standings[edit]

Legend
  Pink jersey   Denotes the winner of the General classification[1][34]   Green jersey   Denotes the winner of the Mountains classification[1][35]
  Purple jersey   Denotes the winner of the Points classification[1][36]   Blue jersey   Denotes the winner of the Intergiro classification[1][37]

General classification[edit]

Rider Team Time
1  Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) Pink jersey Discovery Channel 91h 25' 51"
2  Gilberto Simoni (ITA) Lampre-Caffita + 28"
3  José Rujano (VEN) Green jersey Colombia-Selle Italia + 45"
4  Danilo Di Luca (ITA) Liquigas-Bianchi + 2' 42"
5  Juan Manuel Gárate (ESP) Saunier Duval-Prodir + 3' 11"
6  Serhiy Honchar (UKR) Domina Vacanze + 4' 22"
7  Vladimir Karpets (RUS) Illes Balears-Caisse d'Epargne + 11' 15"
8  Pietro Caucchioli (ITA) Crédit Agricole + 11' 38"
9  Marzio Bruseghin (ITA) Fassa Bortolo + 11' 40"
10  Emanuele Sella (ITA) Ceramica Panaria-Navigare + 12' 33"

Points classification[edit]

Rider Team Points
1  Paolo Bettini (ITA) Purple jersey Quick Step-Innergetic 162
2  Alessandro Petacchi (ITA) Fassa Bortolo 154
3  Danilo Di Luca (ITA) Liquigas-Bianchi 136
4  Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) Pink jersey Discovery Channel 124
5  Ivan Basso (ITA) Team CSC 114
6  Erik Zabel (GER) T-Mobile Team 92
7  José Rujano (VEN) Green jersey Colombia-Selle Italia 89
8  Isaac Gálvez (ESP) Illes Balears-Caisse d'Epargne 85
9  Gilberto Simoni (ITA) Lampre-Caffita 81
10  Iván Parra (COL) Colombia-Selle Italia 80

Mountains classification[edit]

Rider Team Points
1  José Rujano (VEN) Green jersey Colombia-Selle Italia 143
2  Iván Parra (COL) Colombia-Selle Italia 57
3  Gilberto Simoni (ITA) Lampre-Caffita 45
4  Ivan Basso (ITA) Team CSC 41
5  Danilo Di Luca (ITA) Liquigas-Bianchi 29
6  Patrice Halgand (FRA) Crédit Agricole 27
7  Juan Manuel Gárate (ESP) Illes Balears-Caisse d'Epargne
8  Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) Pink jersey Discovery Channel 17
9  Ruslan Ivanov (MDA) Domina Vacanze 15
10  Daniel Atienza (ESP) Cofidis 14

Intergiro classification[edit]

Rider Team Time
1  Stefano Zanini (ITA) Blue jersey Quick Step-Innergetic 54h 37' 01"
2  Paolo Bettini (ITA) Purple jersey Quick Step-Innergetic + 27"
3  Sven Krauß (GER) Gerolsteiner + 30"
4  Bram Schmitz (NED) T-Mobile Team + 2' 16"
5  Ivan Basso (ITA) Team CSC + 2' 31"
6  Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) Pink jersey Discovery Channel + 2' 41"
7  David Zabriskie (USA) Team CSC + 2' 52"
8  Philippe Schnyder (SUI) Colombia-Selle Italia + 3' 00"
9  Ángel Gómez (ESP) Saunier Duval-Prodir + 3' 04"
10  Dariusz Baranowski (POL) Liberty Seguros-Würth + 3' 06"

Trofeo Fast Team classification[edit]

Team Time
1 Liquigas-Bianchi 274h 42' 31"
2 Crédit Agricole + 24' 28"
3 Lampre-Caffita + 29' 21"
4 Domina Vacanze + 32' 27"
5 Illes Balears-Caisse d'Epargne + 1h 8' 29"
6 Davitamon-Lotto + 1h 21' 34"
7 Ceramica Panaria-Navigare + 1h 24' 50"
8 Liberty Seguros-Würth + 1h 26' 50"
9 Saunier Duval-Prodir + 1h 37' 32"
10 Phonak + 1h 49' 00"

Trofeo Super Team classification[edit]

Team Points
1 Davitamon-Lotto 347
2 Liquigas-Bianchi 316
3 Lampre-Caffita 311
4 Fassa Bortolo 296
5 Illes Balears-Caisse d'Epargne 224
6 Quick Step-Innergetic 224
7 Crédit Agricole 213
8 Gerolsteiner 210
9 Lampre-Caffita 208
10 Discovery Channel 204

Minor classifications[edit]

Other less well-known classifications, whose leaders did not receive a special jersey, were awarded during the Giro. Other awards included the Combativity classification, which was a compilation of points gained for position on crossing intermediate sprints, mountain passes and stage finishes.[32] Venezuelan José Rujano won the most combative classification.[1][38] The Azzurri d'Italia classification was based on finishing order, but points were only awarded for the top three finishers in each stage.[32] Alessandro Petacchi won the Azzurri d'Italia classification.[1][39] The Trofeo Fuga Piaggio classification rewarded riders who took part in a breakaway at the head of the field, each rider in an escape of ten or fewer riders getting one point for each kilometre that the group stayed clear.[32] The classification was won by Sven Krauß.[1][40] Teams were given penalty points for minor technical infringements.[32] Fassa Bortolo and T-Mobile Team were most successful in avoiding penalties, and so shared leadership of the Fair Play classification.[1][41]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Anthony Tan (2005-05-29). "Salvation for Savoldelli". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Tim Maloney (2005-05-21). "Il Falco flies again: super Savoldelli soars to maglia rosa". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-30. 
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  5. ^ a b c d Tim Maloney (2005-05-08). "The return of golden boy: Paolo Bettini takes stage and maglia rosa". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-30. 
  6. ^ a b c "Partenti Giro" [Giro Participants] (PDF). La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian). pp. 1–3. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 30 September 2012. 
  7. ^ "Giro D'Italia 2005: Start List". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. 2012-09-20. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  8. ^ Tim Maloney (2005-01-23). "Giro presentation story - January 2005". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-30. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f "Stages" [Stages]. La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian). 05-04-2005. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-30.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  10. ^ a b c d e Tim Maloney (2005-05-19). "Basso busts Giro wide open on first mountain stage and takes maglia rosa". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
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  14. ^ "Stage 17 - May 26: Varazze - Limone Piemonte (Colle di Tenda), 194 km". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f Anthony Tan (2005-05-22). "Courage under fire: Savoldelli saves the day". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
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  17. ^ a b c d e f Jeff Jones (2005-05-23). "Petacchi makes it three". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-30. 
  18. ^ "88° Giro d'Italia - Le Règlement" [88th Giro d'Italia - The Regulations] (PDF). La Gazzetta dello Sport (in French). pp. 1–24. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2012-09-30. 
  19. ^ a b Jeff Jones (2005-05-09). "McEwen takes pink as Petacchi's train upset". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 June 2014. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  20. ^ a b c Anthony Tan (2005-05-10). "Vai Dani - Liquigas gives it gas!". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 June 2014. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  21. ^ a b c Tim Maloney (2005-05-11). "Brutto sprint in Frosinone". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 June 2014. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  22. ^ a b c Tim Maloney (2005-05-14). "Great Gil takes big stage win in Pistoia". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 June 2014. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  23. ^ a b c Tim Maloney (2005-05-15). "CSC's Zabriskie exceptional in TT stage win in Firenze". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 June 2014. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  24. ^ a b Jeff Jones (2005-05-16). "Petacchi does it on the 10th day". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 14 June 2014. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
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