2005 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship

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The 2005 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Tournament was the 35th annual Division I NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship tournament. Sixteen NCAA Division I college men's lacrosse teams met after having played their way through a regular season, and for some, a conference tournament. The championship game was played at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in front of 44,920 fans,[1] The Johns Hopkins Blue Jays won the championship title with a 9–8 win over Duke University. The Blue Jays, led by senior Kyle Harrison and sophomore goalie Jesse Schwartzman, won their eighth NCAA championship and first national championship since 1987, while allowing just one goal the entire second half of the game. Schwartzman was named the tournament's outstanding player.

In an exciting national semi-final game, Hopkins won against Virginia in overtime on a goal by defensive short stick midfielder Benson Erwin. Virginia seemingly had the game locked up in regulation after scoring the go ahead goal with 12.9 seconds remaining. But Hopkins won the ensuing face off and raced down the field tying the game with 1.5 seconds to go, setting up Erwin's overtime heroics.[2]

Tournament results[edit]

First Round Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
                       
1 Johns Hopkins 22
Marist 6
1 Johns Hopkins 19
8 Massachusetts 9
Syracuse 15
8 Massachusetts 16
1 Johns Hopkins 9*
4 Virginia 8
5 Navy 9
Delaware 7
5 Navy 8
4 Virginia 10
Albany 9
4 Virginia 23
1 Johns Hopkins 9
2 Duke 8
3 Maryland 14
Penn State 10
3 Maryland 9
6 Georgetown 8
Army 6
6 Georgetown 16
3 Maryland 9
2 Duke 18
7 Towson 11
Cornell 12
Cornell 8
2 Duke 11
Fairfield 4
2 Duke 23
  • * = Overtime

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Attendance Figures for the NCAA Men's Championships". LaxPower.com. Archived from the original on 10 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-25. 
  2. ^ "NCAA Lacrosse Division I Results / Records" (pdf). NCAA. p. 3 (51). Retrieved 24 April 2014. 

External links[edit]