2005 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament

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2005 NCAA Women's Division I
Basketball Tournament
2005womensfinalfour.png
2005 Women's Final Four logo
Teams 64
Finals site RCA Dome
Indianapolis, Indiana
Champions Baylor (1st title)
Runner-up Michigan State (1st title game)
Semifinalists LSU (2nd Final Four)
Tennessee (16th Final Four)
Winning coach Kim Mulkey (1st title)
MOP Sophia Young Baylor
NCAA Women's Division I Tournaments
«2004 2006»

The 2005 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament began on March 19, 2005 and concluded on April 5, 2005 when Baylor was crowned as the new national champion. The Final Four was held for the first (and last) time at the RCA Dome in Indianapolis, Indiana on April 3 and 5, 2005, and was hosted by Butler University and the Horizon League. Future Final Fours will be held every five years in Indianapolis, the NCAA's home city, will be played at Lucas Oil Stadium, one block south of the Indiana Convention Center, where the RCA Dome is located. Baylor, coached by Kim Mulkey-Robertson, defeated Michigan State, coached by Joanne P. McCallie, 84-62 in the championship game. Baylor's Sophia Young was named Most Outstanding Player. For the first time, taking a page from the Men's Tournament, the regionals were named after the city they were played in, rather than the geographical location (East, Mideast, Midwest and West), and the "pod" system adopted by the Men's Tournament was used.

Notable events[edit]

In three of the four regions, the number one seed in the region advanced to the Final Four. In the Chattanooga Regional, 13th seeded Liberty upset both Penn State and DePaul to advance to the regional semifinal, but there encountered the top seed LSU, who won and went on to defeat Duke to advance to the Final Four in Indianapolis.

In the Philadelphia Regional, Tennessee faced Purdue in the second round. The victory represented the 880th win for coach Pat Summitt, moving her beyond Dean Smith 879 career victories, to claim the top spot in college basketball career victories.[1] Rutgers upset Ohio State to advance to the regional final, but top seeded Tennessee won to advance. In the Kansas City Regional, top seeded Michigan State defeated the 2 seed Stanford to advance. The single exception was in the Tempe Regional, where second seeded Baylor upset North Carolina to earn a spot at the Final Four.

In one semifinal, Baylor faced LSU. Five years earlier, Baylor had won just seven games against twenty losses, and had never been to an NCAA Tournament. Then they hired Kim Mulkey, who coached the team to an NCAA berth in her first year, and now was coaching a team in the Final Four. However, thirteen minutes into the game, LSU led 24–9. The two teams had played before, ant he opening game for Baylor. In that game the Lady Bears found themselves down by 19 points at halftime. They almost closed the gap, but ended up with a one point loss. This time, they found themselves down again by a large margin. Mulkey called a timeout, and the team responded with six straight points. Not long after, a three-pointer cut the lead to six, and they continued to chip away, reaching the halftime with the score tied at 28. After the break, LSU retook the lead, and were up by four points with just over eight minutes to play, but would go scoreless for five minutes. Baylor retook the lead, and held on to win 68–57 to advance to the championship game.[2]

In the second semifinal, Tennessee faced Michigan State, who were playing in their first Final Four. The Lady Vols had a six point lead at halftime, but extended the lead to 16 points with fourteen and a half minutes to go. Although the crowd had watched Baylor recover from a 15 point deficit earlier in the even ling, that had occurred with 28 minutes to play. This time, the deficit was 16 and just over 14 minutes left. The Spartans cut into the lead, and with a minute to go had tied the game. At that point Kristin Haynie, who had only scored two points in the game, stole the ball and ran almost the length of the floor to score a layup and take the lead. Tennessee then missed three shots and Michigan State scored the final points of the game to tie the record for the largest comeback in NCAA Tournament history.[3][4]

The final match up two nontraditional names in women's basketball. Michigan state had never before advanced beyond the second round, and Baylor had but once, and was only in their fourth NCAA tournament ever. Baylor opened up a 19 point lead early, but no lead seemed safe after 15 point and 16 point comebacks in the semifinals. The lead ballooned to 23, then Michigan State attempted a comeback, but the Lady Bears were too strong, and went on to win their first National Championship 84–62.[5]

Locations[edit]

2005 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament is located in USA
Seattle
Seattle
Knoxville
Knoxville
Storrs
Storrs
College  Park
College Park
Minneapolis
Minneapolis
Chapel  Hill
Chapel Hill
Dallas
Dallas
Fresno
Fresno
2005 NCAA NCAA first and second round venues
2005 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament is located in USA
Kansas  City
Kansas City
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Chattanooga
Chattanooga
Tempe
Tempe
Indianapolis
Indianapolis
2005 NCAA Regionals and Final Four

So as to decrease the number of games played on a competing team's home court, the subregionals were held at eight locations, rather than 16, for the first time. Furthermore following the lead of the men's tournament in recent years, the 2005 women's tournament used the "pod system", keeping most teams at or close to the home cities, and were held from March 19 to 22 at these locations:

  • March 19 and 21:
Bank of America Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion, Seattle, Washington (Host: University of Washington)
Reunion Arena, Dallas, Texas (Host: University of Texas at Austin and Texas Tech University)
Save Mart Center, Fresno, California (Host: Fresno State University)
Williams Arena, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Host: University of Minnesota, Twin Cities)
  • March 20 and 22:
Comcast Center, College Park, Maryland (Host: University of Maryland, College Park)
Dean Smith Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Host: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Harry A. Gampel Pavilion, Storrs, Connecticut (Host: University of Connecticut)
Thompson-Boling Arena, Knoxville, Tennessee (Host: University of Tennessee)

The regionals were held from March 24 to 27 in the following regions. The regionals, for the first time, were named after the city they were played in instead of a direction (East, South, Midwest, West).[6]

  • March 26 and 28:
Chattanooga Regional, McKenzie Arena, Chattanooga, Tennessee (Host: University of Tennessee at Chattanooga)
Tempe Regional, Wells Fargo Arena, Tempe, Arizona (Host: Arizona State University)
  • March 27 and 29:
Kansas City Regional, Municipal Auditorium, Kansas City, Missouri (Host: University of Missouri–Kansas City)
Philadelphia Regional, Liacouras Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Host: Temple University)

The regional winners advanced to the Final Four, held on April 3 and 5, 2005 at the RCA Dome, in Indianapolis, Indiana, hosted by both Butler University and the Horizon League.

Tournament records[edit]

  • Margin overcome—Michigan State overcame a 16 point deficit, trailing 47-31, with 16:03 remaining, but rallied to beat Tennessee 68–84. The 16 point margin overcome is the largest in an NCAA semifinal game.[7]

Qualifying teams - automatic[edit]

Sixty-four teams were selected to participate in the 2005 NCAA Tournament. Thirty-one conferences were eligible for an automatic bid to the 2005 NCAA tournament.[7]

Automatic Bids
    Record  
Qualifying School Conference Regular
Season
Conference Seed
Alcorn State University SWAC 21–8 14–4 16
Baylor University Big 12 Conference 27–3 14–2 2
Bowling Green State University MAC 23–7 13–3 13
Canisius College MAAC 21–9 14–4 15
University of Connecticut Big East 23–7 13–3 3
Coppin State University MEAC 23–7 15–3 16
Dartmouth College Ivy League 17–10 12–2 14
Eastern Kentucky University Ohio Valley Conference 23–8 15–1 12
University of Wisconsin–Green Bay Horizon League 27–3 15–1 10
University of Hartford America East 22–8 13–5 14
College of the Holy Cross Patriot League 20–10 12–2 15
Illinois State University Missouri Valley Conference 13–17 7–11 15
Liberty University Big South Conference 24–6 13–1 13
Michigan State University Big Ten 28–3 14–2 1
Middle Tennessee State University Sun Belt Conference 23–7 11–3 12
University of Montana Big Sky Conference 22–7 13–1 12
University of New Mexico Mountain West 26–4 12–2 8
University of North Carolina ACC 28–4 12–2 1
Old Dominion University Colonial 22–8 15–3 11
Oral Roberts University Mid-Continent 22–8 10–6 14
Rice University WAC 24–8 14–4 11
Santa Clara University West Coast Conference 17–13 8–6 15
St. Francis (PA) Northeast Conference 21–9 16–2 14
Stanford University Pac-12 29–2 17–1 2
Stetson University Atlantic Sun Conference 17–13 11–9 16
Texas Christian University Conference USA 23–9 10–4 7
Temple University Atlantic 10 27–3 16–0 6
University of Tennessee SEC 26–4 13–1 1
University of Texas at Arlington Southland 21–9 13–3 13
University of California, Santa Barbara Big West Conference 21–8 16–2 13
Western Carolina University Southern Conference 18–13 10–10 16

Qualifying teams - at-large[edit]

Thirty-three additional teams were selected to complete the sixty-four invitations.[7]

At-large Bids
    Record  
Qualifying School Conference Regular
Season
Conference Seed
University of Arizona Pacific-10 19–11 11–7 9
Arizona State University Pacific-10 21–9 12–6 5
Boston College Big East 19–9 10–6 7
DePaul University Conference USA 25–4 13–1 5
Duke University Atlantic Coast 28–4 12–2 2
Florida State University Atlantic Coast 23–7 9–5 6
The George Washington University Atlantic 10 22–8 13–3 9
University of Georgia Southeastern 22–9 9–5 6
University of Houston Conference USA 21–8 10–4 10
Iowa State University Big 12 23–6 12–4 7
Kansas State University Big 12 23–7 12–4 4
Louisiana Tech University Western Athletic 20–9 14–4 11
University of Louisville Conference USA 22–8 11–3 9
Louisiana State University Southeastern 29–2 14–0 1
University of Maryland, College Park Atlantic Coast 21–9 7–7 7
University of Minnesota Big Ten 24–7 12–4 3
University of Mississippi Southeastern 19–10 8–6 8
North Carolina State University Atlantic Coast 21–7 10–4 5
University of Notre Dame Big East 26–5 13–3 4
Ohio State University Big Ten 29–3 14–2 2
University of Oklahoma Big 12 17–12 8–8 8
University of Oregon Pacific-10 20–9 12–6 10
Pennsylvania State University Big Ten 19–10 13–3 4
Purdue University Big Ten 16–12 9–7 9
University of Richmond Atlantic 10 23–7 12–4 11
Rutgers University Big East 25–6 14–2 3
University of Southern California Pacific-10 19–10 12–6 8
University of Texas at Austin Big 12 21–8 13–3 3
Texas Tech University Big 12 22–7 12–4 4
University of Utah Mountain West 25–7 12–2 10
Vanderbilt University Southeastern 22–7 10–4 5
University of Virginia Atlantic Coast 20–10 8–6 6
Virginia Tech Atlantic Coast 17–11 6–8 12

Bids by conference[edit]

Thirty-one conferences earned an automatic bid. In twenty-one cases, the automatic bid was the only representative from the conference. Thirty-three additional at-large teams were selected from ten of the conferences.[7]

Bids Conference Teams
7 Atlantic Coast North Carolina, Duke, Florida St., Maryland, North Carolina St., Virginia, Virginia Tech
6 Big 12 Baylor, Iowa St., Kansas St., Oklahoma, Texas, Texas Tech
5 Big Ten Michigan St., Minnesota, Ohio St., Penn St., Purdue
5 Pacific-10 Stanford, Arizona, Arizona St., Oregon, Southern California
5 Southeastern Tennessee, Georgia, LSU, Mississippi, Vanderbilt
4 Big East Connecticut, Boston College, Notre Dame, Rutgers
4 Conference USA TCU, DePaul, Houston, Louisville
3 Atlantic 10 Temple, George Washington, Richmond
2 Mountain West New Mexico, Utah
2 Western Athletic Rice, Louisiana Tech
1 America East Hartford
1 Atlantic Sun Stetson
1 Big Sky Montana
1 Big South Liberty
1 Big West UC Santa Barb.
1 Colonial Old Dominion
1 Horizon Green Bay
1 Ivy Dartmouth
1 Metro Atlantic Canisius
1 Mid-American Bowling Green
1 Mid-Continent Oral Roberts
1 Mid-Eastern Coppin St.
1 Missouri Valley Illinois St.
1 Northeast St. Francis Pa.
1 Ohio Valley Eastern Ky.
1 Patriot Holy Cross
1 Southern Western Caro.
1 Southland Texas-Arlington
1 Southwestern Alcorn St..
1 Sun Belt Middle Tenn.
1 West Coast Santa Clara

Bids by state[edit]

The sixty-four teams came from thirty-one states, plus Washington, D.C. Texas had the most teams with seven bids. Nineteen states did not have any teams receiving bids.[7]

NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 2005
Bids State Teams
7 Texas Baylor, Rice, TCU, Texas-Arlington, Houston, Texas, Texas Tech
5 Virginia Liberty, Old Dominion, Richmond, Virginia, Virginia Tech
4 California Santa Clara, Stanford, UC Santa Barb., Southern California
4 North Carolina North Carolina, Western Caro., Duke, North Carolina St.
3 Tennessee Middle Tenn., Tennessee, Vanderbilt
2 Arizona Arizona, Arizona St.
2 Connecticut Connecticut, Hartford
2 Florida Stetson, Florida St.
2 Illinois Illinois St., DePaul
2 Indiana Notre Dame, Purdue
2 Kentucky Eastern Ky., Louisville
2 Louisiana Louisiana Tech, LSU
2 Maryland Coppin St., Maryland
2 Massachusetts Holy Cross, Boston College
2 Mississippi Alcorn St.., Mississippi
2 New York Canisius, St. Francis Pa.
2 Ohio Bowling Green, Ohio St.
2 Oklahoma Oral Roberts, Oklahoma
2 Pennsylvania Temple, Penn St.
1 District of Columbia George Washington
1 Georgia Georgia
1 Iowa Iowa St.
1 Kansas Kansas St.
1 Michigan Michigan St.
1 Minnesota Minnesota
1 Montana Montana
1 New Hampshire Dartmouth
1 New Jersey Rutgers
1 New Mexico New Mexico
1 Oregon Oregon
1 Utah Utah
1 Wisconsin Green Bay

Brackets[edit]

Data source[8]

Chattanooga Regional[edit]

First round
March 19 and 20
Second round
March 21 and 22
Regional semifinals
March 26
Regional finals
March 28
                       
1 LSU 70
16 Stetson 36
1 LSU 76
Knoxville, TN
9 Arizona 43
8 Oklahoma 69
9 Arizona 72
1 LSU 90
13 Liberty 48
5 DePaul 79
12 Virginia Tech 78
5 DePaul 79
College Park, MD
13 Liberty 88
4 Penn State 70
13 Liberty 78
1 LSU 59
2 Duke 49
6 Georgia 75
11 Rice 49
6 Georgia 70
Dallas, TX
3 Texas 68
3 Texas 63
14 Oral Roberts 58
6 Georgia 57
2 Duke 63
7 Boston College 65
10 Houston 43
7 Boston College 65
Chapel Hill, NC
2 Duke 70
2 Duke 80
15 Canisius 48

Tempe Regional[edit]

First round
March 19 and 20
Second round
March 21 and 22
Regional semifinals
March 25
Regional finals
March 27
                       
1 North Carolina 97
16 Coppin State 62
1 North Carolina 71
Chapel Hill, NC
9 George Washington 47
8 Ole Miss 57
9 George Washington 60
1 North Carolina 79
5 Arizona State 72
5 Arizona State 87
12 Eastern Kentucky 65
5 Arizona State 70
Fresno, CA
4 Notre Dame 61
4 Notre Dame 61
13 UC Santa Barbara 51
1 North Carolina 63
2 Baylor 72
6 Virginia 79
11 Old Dominion 57
6 Virginia 58
Minneapolis, MN
3 Minnesota 73
3 Minnesota 64
14 St. Francis (PA) 33
3 Minnesota 57
2 Baylor 64
7 TCU 55
10 Oregon 58
10 Oregon 46
Seattle, WA
2 Baylor 69
2 Baylor 91
15 Illinois State 70

Philadelphia Regional[edit]

First round
March 19 and 20
Second round
March 21 and 22
Regional semifinals
March 26
Regional finals
March 28
                       
1 Tennessee 94
16 Western Carolina 43
1 Tennessee 75
Knoxville, TN
9 Purdue 54
8 New Mexico 56
9 Purdue 68
1 Tennessee 75
4 Texas Tech 59
5 NC State 58
12 Middle Tennessee 60
12 Middle Tennessee 69
Dallas, TX
4 Texas Tech 80
4 Texas Tech 69
13 Texas-Arlington 49
1 Tennessee 59
3 Rutgers 49
6 Temple 66
11 Louisiana Tech 61
6 Temple 54
Storrs, CT
3 Rutgers 61
3 Rutgers 62
14 Hartford 37
3 Rutgers 64
2 Ohio State 58
7 Maryland 65
10 Wisconsin–Green Bay 55
7 Maryland 65
College Park, MD
2 Ohio State 75
2 Ohio State 86
15 Holy Cross 45

Kansas City Regional[edit]

First round
March 19 and 20
Second round
March 21 and 22
Regional semifinals
March 25
Regional finals
March 27
                       
1 Michigan State 73
16 Alcorn State 41
1 Michigan State 61
Minneapolis, MN
8 Southern California 59
8 Southern California 65
9 Louisville 49
1 Michigan State 76
5 Vanderbilt 64
5 Vanderbilt 67
12 Montana 44
5 Vanderbilt 63
Seattle, WA
4 Kansas State 60
4 Kansas State 70
13 Bowling Green 60
1 Michigan State 76
2 Stanford 69
6 Florida State 87
11 Richmond 54
6 Florida State 52
Storrs, CT
3 Connecticut 70
3 Connecticut 95
14 Dartmouth 47
3 Connecticut 59
2 Stanford 76
7 Iowa State 61
10 Utah 73
10 Utah 62
Fresno, CA
2 Stanford 88
2 Stanford 94
15 Santa Clara 57

Final Four - Indianapolis, Indiana[edit]

National Semifinals
April 3
National Championship Game
April 5
           
ME1 LSU 57
W2 Baylor 68
W2 Baylor 84
MW1 Michigan State 62
E1 Tennessee 64
MW1 Michigan State 68

Record by conference[edit]

Conference # of Bids Record Win % Sweet Sixteen Elite Eight Final Four Championship Game
SEC 5 12-5 70.6% 4 2 2 0
Big 12 6 10-5 66.7% 2 1 1 1
Big Ten 5 10-5 66.7% 3 1 1 1
Big South Conference 1 2-1 66.7% 1 0 0 0
Big East 4 7-4 63.6% 2 1 0 0
Pac-10 5 8-5 61.5% 2 1 0 0
ACC 7 9-7 56.3% 2 2 0 0
Sun Belt Conference 1 1-1 50.0% 0 0 0 0
Atlantic 10 3 2-3 40.0% 0 0 0 0
Mountain West 2 1-2 33.3% 0 0 0 0
Conference USA 4 1-4 20.0% 0 0 0 0
WAC 2 0-2 0.0% 0 0 0 0

Nineteen conferences went 0-1: America East, Atlantic Sun Conference Big Sky Conference, Big West Conference, Colonial, Horizon League, Ivy League, MAAC, MAC, Summit League, MEAC, Missouri Valley Conference, Northeast Conference, Ohio Valley Conference, Patriot League, Southern Conference, Southland, SWAC, and West Coast Conference

All-Tournament Team[edit]

Game Officials[edit]

  • Dee Kantner (Semi-Final)
  • Sally Bell (Semi-Final)
  • Tina Napier (Semi-Final)
  • Barb Smith (Semi-Final)
  • Bob Trammel (Semi-Final)
  • Michael Price (Semi-Final)
  • Lisa Mattingly (Final)
  • Melissa Barlow (Final)
  • Scott Yarbrough (Final) [7]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Tennessee's Summitt Wins Her 880th Game". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). March 23, 2005. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Powell, Camille (April 4, 2005). "Baylor Rallies to Topple LSU". The Washington Post (Katharine Weymouth). Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  3. ^ Greenberg, Mel (April 4, 2005). "Michigan State ousts Tennessee The Spartans rallied for a date with Baylor in the NCAA women's final.". Philly.com. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  4. ^ Terry, Mike (April 4, 2005). "Michigan State Ousts Tennessee". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  5. ^ LONGMAN, JERE (April 6, 2005). "Baylor Completes Remarkable Climb to Top". New York Times. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  6. ^ "2005 DIVISION I WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP HANDBOOK". NCAA. p. 10. Retrieved 20 April 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Nixon, Rick. "Official 2022 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book". NCAA. Retrieved 22 April 2012. 
  8. ^ "Official 2012 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book". NCAA. February 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-17.