2006 QH181

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2006 QH181
Discovery
Discovery date August 21, 2006
Designations
MPC designation 2006 QH181
Minor planet category Trans-Neptunian object[1][2]
detached?[3]
3:10 resonance?[3]
Orbital characteristics[4]
Epoch 2013-Nov-04
(Uncertainty=6)[4]
Aphelion 96.65 AU (Q)
Perihelion 38.25 AU (q)
67.45 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.4328
553.9 yr
100.8° (M)
Inclination 19.06°
73.86° (Ω)
211.3° (ω)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 460–1030 km[4][5]
765 km (assumed)[6]
Albedo 0.09? (assumed)
23.6[7]
4.3[4]

2006 QH181, also written as 2006 QH181, is a trans-Neptunian object. It is very likely a dwarf planet,[8] and is part of the scattered disc.[2] It may be a detached object since a perihelion of 37.6 AU may place it outside of the direct influence of Neptune, or it could have a 3:10 resonance with Neptune.[3] It currently has a too poorly determined orbit (U=6)[4] to know if there is a resonance with Neptune.

Distance from the Sun:
Object Distance
in (AU)
APmag
Eris 96.4 18.7
2007 OR10 87.0 21.4
Sedna 86.3 21.0
2012 VP113 83.1 23.4
2006 QH181 82.9 23.6

Distance[edit]

It came to perihelion around 1858.[4] It is currently 82.9 AU from the Sun.[7][9] The only dwarf planets and likely dwarf planets currently farther from the Sun are Eris (96.4 AU),[10] 2007 OR10 (87.0 AU),[11] Sedna (86.3 AU),[12] and 2012 VP113 (83.1 AU). Because it is so far from the Sun, it only has an apparent magnitude of 23.6.[7]

Orbit[edit]

It has been observed 15 times over only three oppositions and thus currently has a somewhat poorly known orbit. JPL ranks orbital quality from 0 to 9 (0 being best), and 2006 QH181 is currently listed with an orbit quality of 6.[13][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MPEC 2008-O05 : Distant Minor Planets". Minor Planet Center & Tamkin Foundation Computer Network. 2008-07-17. Retrieved 2008-07-29. 
  2. ^ a b "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". MPC. Retrieved 2007-03-03. 
  3. ^ a b c Marc W. Buie (2008-03-05). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 06QH181". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2014-02-28. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2006 QH181)". 2013-11-06 last obs. Retrieved 2014-02-02. 
  5. ^ "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Archived from the original on 1 September 2008. Retrieved 2008-07-29. 
  6. ^ Wm. Robert Johnston. "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Archived from the original on 18 February 2007. Retrieved 2007-03-03. 
  7. ^ a b c "AstDyS 2006QH181 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  8. ^ Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2012-01-31. 
  9. ^ "Horizon Online Ephemeris System". California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2009-01-22. 
  10. ^ "AstDyS (136199) Eris Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2012-01-31. 
  11. ^ "AstDyS 2007OR10 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2012-01-31. 
  12. ^ "AstDyS (90377) Sedna Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2012-01-31. 
  13. ^ "2006 QH181". Minor Planet Center, IAU. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 

External links[edit]