2007–08 Serie A

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Serie A
Season 2007–08
Champions Internazionale
Relegated Empoli
Parma
Livorno
Champions League Internazionale
Roma
Juventus
Fiorentina
UEFA Cup Milan
Sampdoria
Udinese
Matches played 380
Goals scored 970 (2.55 per match)
Top goalscorer Alessandro Del Piero
(21 goals)
Highest scoring Udinese 3–5 Genoa
Roma 4–4 Napoli
Torino 4–4 Parma
Average attendance 23,887

The 2007–08 Serie A football season was the seventy-sixth since its establishment, and started on August 26, 2007 and ended on May 18, 2008.[1] Internazionale successfully defended the championship on the final day of the season, finishing first with 85 points, three ahead of Roma.

Events[edit]

Plusvalenze investigation[edit]

Inquiries are being conducted by the CO.VI.SOC. (Italian football's financial watchdogs) into the finances of four Serie A clubs (Internazionale, Milan, Sampdoria, and Reggina) who stand accused of falsely inflating player values - a practice known as plusvalenze in Italian - in order to qualify financially for the 2005-06 Serie A campaign. If the allegations prove true, penalties could range from fines to point deductions, relegation to Serie B, and even the stripping of Internazionale's 2005-06 scudetto (which was actually stripped from Juventus as a result of the Calciopoli scandal before being awarded to Internazionale).[2]

Serie A 2007-08 team distribution

Lazio fan killed by police[edit]

Banner depicting Gabriele Sandri, displayed by Lazio supporters in the Curva Nord of the Stadio Olimpico in Rome.

In the morning of November 11, 2007 26-year old Lazio fan Gabriele Sandri, a DJ from Rome, was killed by a shot in his neck while sitting inside a car,[3] by a policeman, after Some other fans of Lazio violently assaulted with stones a group of Juventus ultras on the A1 Motorway service station of Badia al Pino in Arezzo.[4] Early reports suggested that a stray bullet from a gun, set to distract the group of ultras, hit the Lazio fan in the neck as he sat in a car and killed him.[4] An emergency meeting set up between Lega Calcio president Antonio Matarrese and police chief Antonio Manganelli decided that the game between Inter and Lazio would be called off, but the rest of the fixtures would go ahead that day, starting at a slightly later time (about 10 minutes later).[5] The Atalanta–Milan game was eventually suspended following unrest caused by local ultras attempting to break off the protection glass in order to invade the pitch and stop the match. Later in the afternoon, the Italian Football Federation chose to postpone also the game between AS Roma and Cagliari, whose kick off was scheduled for 8.30 pm at Stadio Olimpico, Rome. However, this did not prevent violent riots, as hundreds of armed hooligans attacked a police barracks and the CONI (Italian Olympic National Committee) headquarters in Rome.[6]

Though Sandri's death was later held by some to have been caused by a tragic error by a policeman who claimed his gun went off as he was running.[7] and prosecutors then opted initially to open an inquiry into manslaughter against the policeman.,[8] nevertheless the initial hearing held that Sandri's death was culpable homicide, and the policeman involved (Luigi Spaccarotella) was condemned to 6 years imprisonment. On appeal, the higher court not only confirmed this judgment, but increased the punishment to 9 years and 4 months as an element of intentionality was found.[9]

Final week[edit]

The championship was assigned in the final week, as Inter, who managed to secure even an 11-point advantage to rivals Roma in mid-season, lost almost all of it in the final weeks, maintaining only a one-point advantage with only one match to play. In the final week, both Inter and Roma were scheduled to play away matches opposed to relegation-battling sides, respectively Parma and Catania. Both matches were successively forbidden to be attended by Inter and Roma fans. In the end, Inter secured the scudetto with a 2–0 win, with both goals being scored in the second half by Zlatan Ibrahimović, who recovered from a long-time injury right in time to play the game, whereas Roma only managed to achieve a 1–1 draw at Stadio Angelo Massimino against Walter Zenga's Catania, a result which allowed the Sicilian side to escape relegation at the expense of Empoli and Parma.

2007–08 teams[edit]

Club City Stadium Capacity 2006-2007 season
Atalanta Bergamo Stadio Atleti Azzurri d'Italia 26,378 8th in Serie A
Cagliari Cagliari Stadio Sant'Elia 23,486 16th in Serie A
Catania Catania Stadio Angelo Massimino 23,420 13th in Serie A
Empoli Empoli Stadio Carlo Castellani 19,795 7th in Serie A
Fiorentina Florence Stadio Artemio Franchi 47,282 6th in Serie A
Genoa Genoa Stadio Luigi Ferraris 36,685 3rd in Serie B
Internazionale Milan San Siro 82,955 Serie A Champions
Juventus Turin Stadio delle Alpi 69,000 Serie B Champions
Lazio Rome Stadio Olimpico 82,307 3rd in Serie A
Livorno Livorno Stadio Armando Picchi 19,238 11th in Serie A
Milan Milan San Siro 82,955 4th in Serie A
Napoli Naples Stadio San Paolo 60,240 2nd in Serie B
Palermo Palermo Stadio Renzo Barbera 37,242 5th in Serie A
Parma Parma Stadio Ennio Tardini 27,906 12th in Serie A
Reggina Reggio Calabria Stadio Oreste Granillo 27,454 16th in Serie A
Roma Rome Stadio Olimpico 82,307 2nd in Serie A
Sampdoria Genoa Stadio Luigi Ferraris 36,685 9th in Serie A
Siena Siena Stadio Artemio Franchi – Montepaschi Arena 15,373 15th in Serie A
Torino Turin Stadio Olimpico di Torino 27,168 17th in Serie A
Udinese Udine Stadio Friuli 41,652 10th in Serie A

Personnels and Sponsoring[edit]

Team Head Coach Kit manufacturer Shirt sponsor
Atalanta Italy Luigi Delneri Asics Sit In Sport- Daihatsu
Cagliari Italy Nedo Sonetti
Italy Davide Ballardini
Umbro Tiscali
Catania Italy Silvio Baldini Legea Energia Siciliana
Empoli Italy Luigi Cagni
Italy Alberto Malesani
Asics Navigare
Computer Gross
Fiorentina Italy Cesare Prandelli Lotto Toyota
Genoa Italy Gian Piero Gasperini Errea Eurobet
Inter Italy Roberto Mancini Nike Pirelli
Juventus Italy Claudio Ranieri Nike New Holland
Lazio Italy Delio Rossi Puma So. Spe
Edileuropa
Livorno Italy Giancarlo Camolese Asics Banca Carige
Milan Italy Carlo Ancelotti Adidas Bwin
Napoli Italy Edoardo Reja Diadora Lete
Parma Italy Domenico Di Carlo Errea Kome
Il Granchio
Gondolino
Coreggio
Palermo Italy Francesco Guidolin Lotto No Sponsor
Reggina Italy Renzo Ulivieri
Italy Massimo Ficcadenti
Italy Nevio Orlandi
Onze Gicos
Roma Italy Luciano Spalletti Kappa WIND
Sampdoria Italy Walter Mazzarri Kappa ERG
Siena Italy Andrea Mandorlini
Italy Mario Beretta
Lotto Montepaschi
Udinese Italy Pasquale Marino Lotto Kia Motors

League table[edit]

Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1 Internazionale (C) 38 25 10 3 69 26 +43 85 2008–09 UEFA Champions League Group stage
2 Roma 38 24 10 4 72 37 +35 82
3 Juventus 38 20 12 6 72 37 +35 72 2008–09 UEFA Champions League Third qualifying round
4 Fiorentina 38 19 9 10 55 39 +16 66
5 Milan 38 18 10 10 66 38 +28 64 2008–09 UEFA Cup First round
6 Sampdoria 38 17 9 12 56 46 +10 60
7 Udinese 38 16 9 13 48 53 −5 0571
8 Napoli 38 14 8 16 50 53 −3 50 2008 UEFA Intertoto Cup Third round
9 Atalanta 38 12 12 14 52 56 −4 48
10 Genoa 38 13 9 16 44 52 −8 48
11 Palermo 38 12 11 15 47 57 −10 47
12 Lazio 38 11 13 14 47 51 −4 46
13 Siena 38 9 17 12 40 45 −5 44
14 Cagliari 38 11 9 18 40 56 −16 042*
15 Torino 38 8 16 14 36 49 −13 40
16 Reggina 38 9 13 16 37 56 −19 40
17 Catania 38 8 13 17 33 45 −12 37
18 Empoli (R) 38 9 9 20 29 52 −23 36 Relegation to Serie B
19 Parma (R) 38 7 13 18 42 62 −20 34
20 Livorno (R) 38 6 12 20 35 60 −25 30

Updated to games played on May 18, 2008.
Source: Serie A
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) head-to-head points; 3) head-to-head goal difference; 4) head-to-head goals scored; 5) goal difference; 6) number of goals scored
1 The 7th-placed team qualified for the UEFA Cup due to both of the Coppa Italia finalists, Roma and Internazionale, finishing 6th or higher.
* Cagliari was deducted 3 points for filing an unauthorized lawsuit, but the penalty was later reversed.
(C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (E) = Eliminated; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round.
Only applicable when the season is not finished:
(Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular phase indicated; (RQ) = Qualified to the relegation tournament indicated; (DQ) = Disqualified from tournament.
Head-to-Head: used when head-to-head record is used to rank tied teams.

Results[edit]

Home ╲ Away[1] ATA CAG CTN EMP FIO GEN INT JUV LAZ LIV MIL NAP PAL PAR REG ROM SAM SIE TOR UDI
Atalanta 2–2 0–0 4–1 2–2 2–0 0–2 0–4 2–1 3–2 2–1 5–1 1–3 2–0 2–2 1–2 4–1 2–2 2–2 0–0
Cagliari 1–0 1–1 2–0 2–1 2–1 0–2 2–3 1–0 0–0 1–2 2–1 0–1 1–1 2–2 1–1 0–3 1–0 3–0 0–1
Catania 1–2 2–1 1–0 0–1 0–0 0–2 1–1 1–0 1–0 1–1 3–0 3–1 0–0 1–2 1–1 2–0 0–0 1–2 2–0
Empoli 0–1 4–1 2–0 0–2 1–1 0–2 0–0 1–0 2–1 1–3 0–0 3–1 1–1 1–1 2–2 0–2 0–2 0–0 0–1
Fiorentina 2–2 5–1 2–1 3–1 3–1 0–2 1–1 1–0 1–0 0–1 1–0 1–0 3–1 2–0 2–2 2–2 3–0 2–1 1–2
Genoa 2–1 2–0 2–1 0–1 0–0 1–1 0–2 0–2 1–1 0–3 2–0 3–3 1–0 2–0 0–1 0–1 1–3 3–0 3–2
Internazionale 2–1 2–1 2–0 1–0 2–0 4–1 1–2 3–0 2–0 2–1 2–1 2–1 3–2 2–0 1–1 3–0 2–2 4–0 1–1
Juventus 1–0 1–1 1–1 3–0 2–3 1–0 1–1 5–2 5–1 3–2 1–0 5–0 3–0 4–0 1–0 0–0 2–0 0–0 0–1
Lazio 3–0 3–1 2–0 0–0 0–1 1–2 1–1 2–3 2–0 1–0 2–1 1–2 1–0 1–0 3–2 2–1 1–1 2–2 0–1
Livorno 1–1 1–2 1–0 1–0 0–3 1–1 2–2 1–3 0–1 1–4 1–2 2–4 1–1 1–1 1–1 3–1 0–0 0–1 0–0
Milan 1–2 3–1 1–1 0–1 1–1 2–0 2–1 0–0 1–1 1–1 5–2 2–1 1–1 5–1 0–1 1–2 1–0 0–0 4–1
Napoli 2–0 0–2 2–0 1–3 2–0 1–2 1–0 3–1 2–2 1–0 3–1 1–0 1–0 1–1 0–2 2–0 0–0 1–1 3–1
Palermo 0–0 2–1 1–0 2–0 2–0 2–3 0–0 3–2 2–2 1–0 2–1 2–1 1–1 1–1 0–2 0–1 2–3 1–1 1–1
Parma 2–3 1–1 2–2 1–0 1–2 1–0 0–2 2–2 2–2 3–2 0–0 1–2 2–1 3–0 0–3 1–2 2–2 2–0 2–0
Reggina 1–1 2–0 3–1 2–0 0–0 2–0 0–1 2–1 1–1 1–3 0–1 1–1 0–0 2–1 0–2 1–0 4–0 1–3 1–3
Roma 2–1 2–0 2–0 2–1 1–0 3–2 1–4 2–2 3–2 1–1 2–1 4–4 1–0 4–0 2–0 2–0 3–0 4–1 2–1
Sampdoria 3–0 1–1 3–1 3–0 2–0 0–0 1–1 3–3 0–0 2–0 0–5 2–0 3–0 3–1 3–0 0–3 1–0 2–2 3–0
Siena 1–1 1–0 1–1 3–0 1–0 0–1 2–3 1–0 1–1 2–3 1–1 1–1 2–2 2–0 0–0 3–0 1–2 0–0 1–1
Torino 1–0 2–0 1–1 0–1 0–1 1–1 0–1 0–1 0–0 1–2 0–1 2–1 3–1 4–4 2–2 0–0 1–0 1–1 0–1
Udinese 2–0 0–2 2–1 2–2 3–1 3–5 0–0 1–2 2–2 2–0 0–1 0–5 1–1 2–1 2–0 1–3 3–2 2–0 2–1

Source: lega-calcio.it (Italian)
^ The home team is listed in the left-hand column.
Colours: Purple = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Top goalscorers[edit]

Updated to games played May 17, 2008[10]

21 goals
20 goals
19 goals
17 goals
15 goals
14 goals

Coaches[edit]

Club Head coach From To
Atalanta Delneri, LuigiLuigi Delneri June 9, 2007[11]
Cagliari Giampaolo, MarcoMarco Giampaolo February 26, 2007[12] November 13, 2007[13]
Sonetti, NedoNedo Sonetti November 13, 2007[14] December 27, 2007[15]
Ballardini, DavideDavide Ballardini December 27, 2007[15]
Catania Baldini, SilvioSilvio Baldini June 3, 2007[16] March 31, 2008[17]
Zenga, WalterWalter Zenga April 1, 2008[18]
Empoli Cagni, LuigiLuigi Cagni January 19, 2006[19] November 26, 2007[20]
Malesani, AlbertoAlberto Malesani November 26, 2007[20] March 31, 2008[21]
Cagni, LuigiLuigi Cagni March 31, 2008[21]
Fiorentina Prandelli, CesareCesare Prandelli June 10, 2005[22]
Genoa Gasperini, Gian PieroGian Piero Gasperini June 29, 2006[23]
Internazionale Mancini, RobertoRoberto Mancini July 7, 2004[24]
Juventus Ranieri, ClaudioClaudio Ranieri June 4, 2007[25]
Lazio Rossi, DelioDelio Rossi June 10, 2005[22]
Livorno Orsi, FernandoFernando Orsi March 21, 2007[26] October 9, 2007[27]
Camolese, GiancarloGiancarlo Camolese October 10, 2007[28] April 28, 2008[29]
Orsi, FernandoFernando Orsi April 28, 2008[29]
Milan Ancelotti, CarloCarlo Ancelotti November 5, 2001[30]
Napoli Reja, EdoardoEdoardo Reja January 18, 2005[31]
Palermo Colantuono, StefanoStefano Colantuono June 7, 2007[32] November 26, 2007[33]
Guidolin, FrancescoFrancesco Guidolin November 26, 2007[33] March 24, 2008[34]
Colantuono, StefanoStefano Colantuono March 24, 2008[34]
Parma Di Carlo, DomenicoDomenico Di Carlo June 12, 2007[35] March 10, 2008[36]
Cúper, HéctorHéctor Cúper March 11, 2008[37] May 12, 2008[38]
Manzo, AndreaAndrea Manzo May 12, 2008[38]
Reggina Ficcadenti, MassimoMassimo Ficcadenti July 1, 2007[39] November 1, 2007[40]
Ulivieri, RenzoRenzo Ulivieri November 1, 2007[41] March 3, 2008[42]
Orlandi, NevioNevio Orlandi March 3, 2008[42]
Roma Spalletti, LucianoLuciano Spalletti June 17, 2005[43]
Sampdoria Mazzarri, WalterWalter Mazzarri May 31, 2007[44]
Siena Mandorlini, AndreaAndrea Mandorlini June 12, 2007[45] November 12, 2007[46]
Beretta, MarioMario Beretta November 12, 2007[46]
Torino Novellino, WalterWalter Novellino June 6, 2007[47] April 16, 2008[48]
De Biasi, GianniGianni De Biasi April 16, 2008[48]
Udinese Marino, PasqualePasquale Marino June 5, 2007[49]

2007-08 events[edit]

  • Atalanta: on June 9, 2007 Luigi Delneri was announced as new head coach following Stefano Colantuono's departure to Palermo.[11]
  • Cagliari: on November 13 Cagliari chairman Massimo Cellino sacked Marco Giampaolo and replaced him with veteran coach Nedo Sonetti, who already served twice with the rossoblu before this new appointment.[13][14] On December 19 Sonetti tendered his resignation, after he managed to achieve only one point in three matches in charge, and Cellino called Giampaolo to serve again as rossoblu head coach.[50] However, Giampaolo, still linked to Cagliari by a contract, turned down the opportunity to return.[51] The next day, the club announced that it had rejected Sonetti's resignation.[52] Sonetti was ultimately sacked only a few days later, on December 27, following a crushing 5–1 loss to Fiorentina, and replaced by Davide Ballardini, who served as Cagliari head coach in the early weeks of the 2005–06 season.[15]
  • Catania: on June 3, 2007 Silvio Baldini was announced as new head coach.[16] The team initially enjoyed a good shape, notably gaining a spot in the Coppa Italia semi-finals, but lost position with time, being in 16th place as of Week 31, only three points ahead of last-placed Empoli, convincing Baldini to leave the club with mutual consent on March 31, 2008.[17] He was replaced the next day by Walter Zenga, former head coach of Red Star Belgrade and Steaua Bucharest, at his first coaching experience with a Serie A team.[18]
  • Empoli: on November 26, 2007 the Tuscan side chose to sack Luigi Cagni, who achieved only ten points in fourteen matches (18th place in the league table) and failed to win the UEFA Cup 2007-08 first round, replacing him with Alberto Malesani.[20] On March 31, 2008, after a 2–0 home loss to Sampdoria which left Empoli alone in last place, the board decided to sack Malesani, reinstalling Cagni in charge.[21]
  • Juventus: on June 4, 2007 former Parma head coach Claudio Ranieri was unveiled as new boss.[25]
  • Livorno: on October 9, 2007 Fernando Orsi was sacked following a string of poor results that brought the team down to bottom place in the league with two points and no win after seven games.[27] The position was then filled by Giancarlo Camolese the next day.[28] Camolese initially managed to improve Livorno's performances; however in the final part of the season Livorno entered into a deep result crisis that led them down to the league bottom, with three matches remaining, and Camolese being ultimately sacked on April 28, 2008, with Orsi re-appointed back at the helm of the amaranto.[29]
  • Palermo: on June 7, 2007 Stefano Colantuono of Atalanta was announced to be the next rosanero boss for the 2007-08 season.[32] However, on November 26 Colantuono was sacked following a 5–0 defeat to Juventus, and club chairman Maurizio Zamparini appointed Francesco Guidolin as his replacement, inaugurating a fourth spell with Palermo for the tactician.[33] However, results did not improve under Guidolin, and three consecutive losses, followed by some controversial post-match comments in a 2–3 home loss to Genoa on March 22, 2008 led Zamparini to re-appoint Colantuono at the helm of the rosanero on March 24.[34]
  • Parma: on June 12, 2007 Domenico Di Carlo was announced as new boss following the departure of Claudio Ranieri.[35] However, as Parma struggled to keep themselves off the relegation battle, Di Carlo was sacked on March 10, 2008 following a 1–2 home defeat to Sampdoria.[36] The next day the club announced to have appointed Héctor Cúper as new head coach.[37] The Argentine boss did not manage to improve results, with Parma finding themselves in 18th place with only one remaining match to be played at home against first-placed Internazionale, only two points behind the last Serie A spot. On May 12 Parma chairman Tommaso Ghirardi then surprisingly announced to have sacked Cúper, replacing him with youth team coach Andrea Manzo for the final league matchday in a desperate attempt to escape relegation.[38]
  • Reggina: on June 23, 2007 news reports announced Massimo Ficcadenti as new boss following the departure of Walter Mazzarri.[53] However, on June 27 Verona announced they were not giving Ficcadenti permission to leave the club and move to Reggina.[54][55] On July 1, Reggina finally announced on their website to have appointed Ficcadenti as coach, after he successfully rescinded his contract with Verona.[39] Ficcadenti was however sacked on November 1, following a 3–1 home loss to last-placed Livorno and no wins in the first ten league days,[40] and veteran coach Renzo Ulivieri was appointed to replace him.[41] However, on March 3, 2008 the club management decided to dismiss Ulivieri from his post following a 0–0 home draw to Palermo, as Reggina was filling the 19th place with 22 points, and replaced him with team scout and former youth team coach Nevio Orlandi.[42]
  • Sampdoria: on May 31, 2007 Walter Mazzarri was named new Samp boss.[44]
  • Siena: on June 12, 2007 Andrea Mandorlini was confirmed new head coach following separation by mutual consent between the club and its boss Mario Beretta.[45][56] However Mandorlini was sacked on November 12, after a 2–3 home loss to Livorno which left the team in last place, and Beretta accepted to return at Siena.[46]
  • Torino: on June 6, 2007 former Sampdoria boss Walter Novellino was announced head coach for the new season, replacing Gianni De Biasi.[47] On April 16, 2008, following a string of disappointing results that left the granata only four points ahead the relegation zone, leading to heavy criticisms from the supporting fanbase, Torino president Urbano Cairo chose to sack Novellino and reappoint De Biasi, a fan favourite, as head coach.[48]
  • Udinese: on June 5, 2007 former Catania boss Pasquale Marino was officially unveiled as new head coach.[49]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Gazzetta dello Sport (2007-06-21). "Abete, ok "con rammarico". La serie A parte il 26 agosto" (in Italian). Retrieved 2007-06-22. 
  2. ^ Football Italia (2007-06-20). "Could Inter be demoted?". Archived from the original on 2007-06-26. Retrieved 2007-06-22. 
  3. ^ "Officer 'rues' killing Lazio fan". BBC News. 2007-11-12. Retrieved 2010-04-22. 
  4. ^ a b Football Italia (2007-11-11). "Lazio fan killed - Serie A stopped?". Archived from the original on 2007-11-13. Retrieved 2007-11-11. 
  5. ^ Football Italia (2007-11-11). "Inter-Lazio Off". Archived from the original on 2007-11-12. Retrieved 2007-11-11. 
  6. ^ "Italy fans rampage after killing". BBC News. 2007-11-12. Archived from the original on 13 November 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-15. 
  7. ^ "Officer 'rues' killing Lazio fan". BBC News. 2007-11-12. Archived from the original on 14 November 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-15. 
  8. ^ "Probe starts on Italy fan death". BBC News. 2007-11-12. Archived from the original on 15 November 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-15. 
  9. ^ "Sandri- fu omicidio volontario". La Repubblica in Italian. 2007-11-12. Retrieved 2010-12-04. 
  10. ^ "SPORT - CALCIO - SERIE A - Marcatori" (in Italian). La Repubblica. Archived from the original on 15 October 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-21. 
  11. ^ a b "Atalanta appoint Del Neri". Football Italia. 2007-06-09. Archived from the original on 2007-06-13. Retrieved 2007-06-09. 
  12. ^ "De Biasi-Giampaolo, il ritorno" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2007-02-26. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  13. ^ a b "Cagliari sack Giampaolo - official". Football Italia. 2007-11-13. Archived from the original on 2007-11-14. Retrieved 2007-11-13. 
  14. ^ a b "Cagliari: ufficiale, il nuovo tecnico e` Sonetti" (in Italian). Datasport. 2007-11-13. Retrieved 2007-11-13. 
  15. ^ a b c "Cagliari appoint new coach". Football Italia. 2007-12-27. Archived from the original on 2007-12-30. Retrieved 2007-12-27. 
  16. ^ a b "Baldini is new Catania coach". Football Italia. 2007-06-03. Archived from the original on 2007-10-15. Retrieved 2007-06-04. 
  17. ^ a b "Catania, Baldini se ne va. Zenga sempre più vicino" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2008-03-31. Archived from the original on 3 April 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-01. 
  18. ^ a b "Zenga riparte da Catania" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2008-04-01. Retrieved 2008-04-01. 
  19. ^ "Somma addio, ecco Cagni" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2006-01-19. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  20. ^ a b c "Empoli axe Cagni". Football Italia. 2007-11-26. Archived from the original on 2007-11-28. Retrieved 2007-11-27. 
  21. ^ a b c "L'Empoli licenzia Malesani. In panchina torna Cagni" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2008-03-31. Archived from the original on 7 April 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-31. 
  22. ^ a b "Rossi alla Lazio, Gregucci a Lecce. E Sensi prende Nonda dal Monaco" (in Italian). La Repubblica. 2005-06-10. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  23. ^ "Gasperini nuovo allenatore Genoa" (in Italian). RAI Sport. 2006-06-29. Archived from the original on 2007-11-17. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  24. ^ "Mancini allenerà l'Inter, tre anni in nerazzurro" (in Italian). La Repubblica. 2004-07-07. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  25. ^ a b "Ranieri appointed Juventus coach". BBC News. 2007-06-04. Archived from the original on 23 June 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-04. 
  26. ^ "Sorpresa Livorno: arriva Orsi" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2007-03-21. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  27. ^ a b "Livorno sack Orsi". Football Italian. 2007-10-09. Archived from the original on 2007-11-17. Retrieved 2007-10-09. 
  28. ^ a b "Livorno turn to Camolese". Football Italia. 2007-10-10. Archived from the original on 2007-11-13. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  29. ^ a b c "Spinelli caccia Camolese. Il Livorno torna ad Orsi" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2008-04-28. Archived from the original on 29 April 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-28. 
  30. ^ "Via Terim, arriva Ancelotti" (in Italian). RAI Sport. 2001-11-05. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  31. ^ "Calcio. Napoli, ora e' ufficiale: Reja il nuovo tecnico" (in Italian). RAI News 24. 2005-01-18. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  32. ^ a b "Palermo confirm Colantuono deal". Football Italia. 2007-06-07. Archived from the original on 2007-06-13. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  33. ^ a b c "Palermo sack Colantuono". Football Italia. 2007-11-26. Archived from the original on 2007-11-28. Retrieved 2007-11-26. 
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