2007 in spaceflight

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2007 in spaceflight
Orbital launches
First 10 January
Last 25 December
Total 68
Successes 63
Failures 3
Partial failures 2
Catalogued 65
National firsts
Satellite  Colombia
 Mauritius
Space traveller  Malaysia
Rockets
Maiden flights Atlas V 421
Long March 3B/E
Proton-M Enhanced
PSLV-CA
Shavit-2
Zenit-2M
Retirements H-IIA 2022
Manned flights
Orbital 5
Total travellers 27

The year 2007 contained several significant events in spaceflight, including a Chinese ASAT test, the launches of the US Phoenix and Dawn missions to study Mars and Asteroid belt respectively, Japan's Kaguya Lunar orbiter, and the first Chinese Lunar probe, Chang'e 1.

The internationally accepted definition of a spaceflight is any flight which crosses the Kármán line, 100 kilometres above sea level. The first recorded spaceflight launch of the year occurred on 10 January, when a PSLV, launched from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre, placed four spacecraft into low Earth orbit. One of these spacecraft was SRE-1, which returned to Earth twelve days later, in the first Indian attempt to recover a satellite after re-entry.

Several carrier rockets made their maiden flights in 2007; the PSLV-CA, Long March 3B/E, Shavit-2, Zenit-2M, Proton-M Enhanced. These were all modernised or upgraded versions of existing systems. The RS-24 missile also conducted its first launch, and the Atlas V made its first flight in the 421 configuration. The first Colombian and Mauritian satellites, Libertad 1 and Rascom-QAF 1 respectively, were launched in 2007, although a helium leak reduced Rascom's operational lifetime by thirteen years.

Space exploration[edit]

The launch of a Delta II Heavy with the Dawn spacecraft.

Several spacecraft were launched to explore the Moon. Japan's Kaguya orbiter, along with the smaller Okina and Ouna relay spacecraft, was launched on 14 September. The spacecraft entered Selenocentric orbit on 3 October. China launched its first Lunar probe, Chang'e 1, on 24 October, with the spacecraft entering Selenocentric orbit on 5 November. In 2009, two satellites launched into highly elliptical Earth orbits in 2007 as part of the THEMIS mission were also sent to the Moon. They are expected to arrive in October 2010.

In August, the NASA Phoenix spacecraft was launched towards Mars, followed by the Dawn mission to the Asteroid belt in September. Cassini continued to make flybys of the moons of Saturn, mostly focussing on Titan. In November, Rosetta flew past Earth, where is was mistaken for an asteroid, and given the provisional designation 2007 VN84.

Manned spaceflight[edit]

Five manned flights were launched in 2007, two by Russia and three by the United States. Russia flew two Soyuz missions to the International Space Station for crew rotation. Soyuz TMA-10, launched on 7 April, carried the Expedition 15 crew to the Station. Space tourist Charles Simonyi was also launched on this flight, and landed aboard Soyuz TMA-9 a few days later. When TMA-10 returned to Earth in October, it made the first of two consecutive ballistic re-entries of Soyuz spacecraft, due to problems with separation bolts. Soyuz TMA-11, launched on 10 October, carried the Expedition 16 crew, and the first Malaysian in space, Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor, who was selected for flight under the Angkasawan programme. He landed aboard Soyuz TMA-10. When TMA-11 landed in 2008, it also made a ballistic descent.

The newly installed Harmony node of the ISS

2007 also saw the continued assembly of the International Space Station, by US Space Shuttle flights. On 8 June Atlantis made the first Shuttle launch of the year, STS-117, with seven astronauts, and the S3/4 truss segment of the ISS. It was the first Shuttle to launch from Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center since STS-107 in 2003. Launch had previously been delayed from February due to Hail damage to the External Tank, which required a rollback to repair in the Vehicle Assembly Building. In August, Endeavour launched on its first mission since 2002, STS-118. This carried the S5 truss segment, and marked the final flight of the Spacehab module, which was used to carry supplies. NASA's first Educator Astronaut, Barbara Morgan flew aboard STS-118. Morgan had previously been a backup for Christa McAuliffe, who was killed in the Challenger accident in 1986. STS-120, launched on 23 October using Discovery, carried the Harmony node, the first pressurised ISS component to be launched since Pirs in September 2001. Attempts to launch Atlantis in December on STS-122 were scrubbed, and the launch was delayed to 2008 after ECO sensors in the External Tank failed.

Launch failures[edit]

Three orbital launch attempts in 2007, involving a Zenit, a Falcon 1, and a Proton failed, and two others, an Atlas V and a GSLV, resulted in partial failures. On 30 January, a Sea Launch Zenit-3SL exploded on the Ocean Odyssey launch platform, seconds after ignition. The failure destroyed the NSS-8 satellite, and caused considerable damage to the Odyssey platform. It was later determined that the failure had been caused by debris in the turbopump. As a result of downtime to conduct repairs, and bad sea conditions at the end of the year, Sea Launch did not conduct another launch until 2008.

On 21 March, SpaceX launched the second Falcon 1. Due to the failure of the maiden flight, the launch was conducted as a demonstration flight without a functional payload. The launch failed to reach orbit due to a chain of events, starting with an error in setting the fuel mix ratio, which resulted in first stage underperformance, and the rocket being too low at the time of first stage separation. Additional atmospheric drag at this altitude caused recontact between the stages, setting up a fuel slosh in the second stage. This resulted in the premature cutoff of the second stage, and the rocket failed to reach orbit. This was the last launch of the Falcon 1 with the ablatively cooled Merlin-1A engine, which was replaced with the regeneratively cooled Merlin-1C for subsequent flights, starting in August 2008. As several test objectives were completed, SpaceX claimed that the launch was a success overall, and declared the Falcon 1 operational.

The Atlas family ended a run of eighty consecutive successful launches over fourteen years, after a partial failure of an Atlas V launched on 15 June. A faulty valve caused a fuel leak in the Centaur upper stage, resulting in a premature cutoff at the end of its second burn. This resulted in the USA-194 satellites being delivered into a lower orbit than planned. The spacecraft were able to correct the orbit using their manoeuvring engines.

The fifth GSLV was launched on 2 September, with the INSAT-4CR satellite. This was the first GSLV launch since the failure in July 2006. The rocket underperformed, and placed the satellite into an orbit with a lower apogee and greater inclination than planned. This required the spacecraft to use fuel reserved for stationkeeping to raise itself to the correct orbit, at the expense of its operational lifetime.

On 5 September, a Proton-M with a Briz-M upper stage failed to place the JCSAT-11 into orbit, after the second stage of the carrier rocket failed to separate from the first. It was later established that damaged cabling had been the cause of the malfunction.

Summary of launches[edit]

The launch of a Delta IV Heavy with the final DSP satellite.

In total, sixty eight orbital launches were made in 2007, with sixty five reaching orbit, and three outright failures. This was an increase of two orbital launch attempts on 2006, with one more launch reaching orbit. The final launch of the year was conducted on 25 December, by a Proton-M with three GLONASS navigation satellites for the Russian government.

Suborbital spaceflight in 2007 saw a number of sounding rocket and missile launches. On 11 January, the Chinese People's Liberation Army used a Dong-Feng 21 derived anti-satellite weapon to destroy Feng Yun 1C, a retired weather satellite. Russia also began testing the RS-24 Yars missile

China conducted ten orbital launches in 2007, using the Long March family of rockets, whilst Europe conducted five using the Ariane 5. India made three orbital launch attempts, using PSLV-C, PSLV-CA and GSLV rockets, with the GSLV launch resulting in a partial failure. Israel conducted a single successful launch using the first Shavit-2 rocket. Japan successfully launched two H-IIA rockets. Russia and the former Soviet Union conducted twenty six launches, including one failure, but not including the international Sea Launch programme, whose single launch attempt failed. Nineteen launches were conducted by the United States, which had originally announced plans to launch many more, however technical issues with the Atlas V, Delta IV and Falcon 1, caused a number of delays. Two of six planned Space Shuttle launches were also delayed to 2008, STS-123 due to knock-on delays from STS-117, and STS-122 due to problems with engine cutoff sensors.


Launches[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Launch site LSP
Payload Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks

January[edit]

10 January
03:53[1]
IndiaPSLV-C IndiaSatish Dhawan FLP IndiaISRO
IndiaCartosat-2 ISRO Sun-synchronous Imagery In orbit Ongoing
IndiaSRE-1 ISRO Low Earth (polar) Technology 22 January
04:16[2]
Successful
IndonesiaGermanyLapan-TUBsat LAPAN/TU Berlin Low Earth (polar) Imagery In orbit Ongoing
ArgentinaPehuensat-1 AATE Low Earth (polar) Technology In orbit Ongoing
SRE was the first Indian spacecraft to be recovered following reentry, Pehuensat intentionally remained attached to payload adaptor
11 January
22:28[3][4]
ChinaDF-21 ChinaXichang[5] ChinaPLA
ChinaASAT PLA Suborbital ASAT test 11 January Successful
Destroyed Feng Yun 1C satellite
16 January
02:20[4]
JapanS-310 JapanUchinoura JapanJAXA
JAXA Suborbital Ionospheric 16 January Successful
18 January
02:12[5]
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-59 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 1 August
19:26
Successful
ISS flight 24P
19 January
12:29[4]
CanadaBlack Brant VB United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesJOULE II Clemson Suborbital Auroral 19 January Successful
19 January
12:30[4]
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesJOULE II Clemson Suborbital Auroral 19 January Successful
19 January
12:44[4]
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesJOULE II Clemson Suborbital Auroral 19 January Successful
19 January
12:45[4]
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesJOULE II Clemson Suborbital Auroral 19 January Successful
27 January
05:20[4]
RussiaR-17 Elbrus United StatesBarking Sands United StatesUS Army
United StatesFFT-6 FMA MDA Suborbital Target 27 January Successful
Intercepted by THAAD
27 January[4] United StatesTHAAD United StatesBarking Sands United StatesUS Army
United StatesFFT-6 MDA Suborbital ABM test 27 January Successful
30 January
23:22[5]
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
NetherlandsNSS-8 SES New Skies Intended: Geosynchronous Communication T-0 Launch failure
First stage engine failed due to debris in turbopump,[6] rocket exploded on launch pad
30 January[4] RussiaR-17 Elbrus SyriaSyria SyriaSyrian Army
Syrian Army Suborbital Missile test 30 January Successful

February[edit]

2 February
16:28[7]
ChinaLong March 3A ChinaXichang LA-2 ChinaCNSA
ChinaBeidou-1D CNSA Geostationary Navigation In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
Operational
Problems deploying solar panels, eventually corrected from ground
7 February
08:15[4]
United StatesLGM-30G Minuteman III United StatesVandenberg LF-10 United StatesUS Air Force
United StatesGT-193GM US Air Force Suborbital Missile test 7 February Successful
Impacted Reagan Test Site
12 February
12:45[4]
CanadaBlack Brant XII United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesROPA[8] Dartmouth Suborbital Auroral 12 February Successful
14 February
09:22[4]
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesHEX 2 Alaska Suborbital Thermospheric 14 February Successful
14 February
09:27[4]
CanadaBlack Brant X United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesHEX 2 Alaska Suborbital Thermospheric 14 February Successful
14 February
09:36[4]
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesHEX 2 Alaska Suborbital Thermospheric 14 February Successful
14 February
09:38[4]
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesHEX 2 Alaska Suborbital Thermospheric 14 February Successful
17 February
23:01[7]
United StatesDelta II 7925-10C United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17B United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesTHEMIS A NASA Highly elliptical Auroral In orbit Operational
United StatesTHEMIS B (2007–2009)
United StatesArtemis P1 (2009—)
NASA Highly elliptical
Selenocentric (planned)
Auroral In orbit Operational
United StatesTHEMIS C (2007–2009)
United StatesArtemis P2 (2009—)
NASA Highly elliptical
Selenocentric (planned)
Auroral In orbit Operational
United StatesTHEMIS D NASA Highly elliptical Auroral In orbit Operational
United StatesTHEMIS E NASA Highly elliptical Auroral In orbit Operational
Primary THEMIS mission completed in 2009. Three spacecraft remain in use for an extension of the same mission, whilst the other two are en route to the Moon for the Artemis mission.
24 February
04:41[7]
JapanH-IIA 2024 JapanTanegashima LA-Y1 JapanJAXA
JapanIGS-Radar 2[7] CSICE Sun-synchronous Reconnaissance In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
JapanIGS-Optical 3V[7] CSICE Sun-synchronous Reconnaissance
Technology
12 November 2013
02:31
Successful
IGS-Radar 2 failed on 29 August 2010 due to battery problems[9]
25 February[7] IranShahab-3 IranIran IranIARI
IranKavesh INSA Suborbital Scientific 25 February Successful
First successful Iranian scientific launch
28 February
08:39[4]
CanadaBlack Brant XII United StatesPoker Flat United StatesNASA
United StatesCHARM Dartmouth Suborbital Scientific 28 February Successful

March[edit]

1 March IndiaRH-200SV NorwayAndøya NorwayAndøya
NorwayMini-DUSTY 13 Andøya Suborbital Technology 1 March Partial launch failure
Rocket underperformed and failed to reach correct apogee
6 March
00:30[4]
United StatesSR-19 United StatesC-17, Kauai United StatesUS Air Force
US Army/MDA Suborbital Target 6 March Successful
9 March
03:10[10]
United StatesAtlas V 401 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-41 United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesASTRO DARPA Low Earth Technology In orbit Successful
United StatesNEXTSat DARPA Low Earth Technology In orbit Successful
United StatesMidSTAR-1 US Naval Academy Low Earth Radiation
Technology
In orbit Operational
United StatesFalconSAT-3 US Air Force Academy Low Earth Ionospheric
Plasma
In orbit Operational
United StatesSTPSat-1 US Air Force/STP Low Earth Atmospheric
Technology
In orbit Operational
United StatesCFESat LANL Low Earth Ionospheric In orbit Operational
ASTRO and NEXTSat were used for the Orbital Express test programme, with the former refuelling and servicing the latter
Launch designated STP-1
11 March
22:03[10]
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
United KingdomSkynet 5A Paradigm/MoD Geostationary Communications In orbit Operational
IndiaINSAT 4B ISRO Geostationary Communications In orbit Operational
21 March
01:10[11]
United StatesFalcon 1 Marshall IslandsOmelek United StatesSpaceX
United StatesDemoSat (LCT2/AFSS) SpaceX/DARPA/NASA Intended: Low Earth Technology 21 March Launch failure
Loss of signal after control problems, failed to reach orbit, some test objectives achieved
21 March
04:27[4]
United StatesChimera (Minuteman/Minotaur II) United StatesVandenberg LF-06 United StatesOrbital Sciences
US Air Force Suborbital Target 21 March Successful
Tracking demonstration
30 March IndiaDhanush IndiaShip, Indian Ocean IndiaDRDO
DRDO Suborbital Target 30 March Successful
apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)

April[edit]

6 April
06:42[4]
RussiaR-17 Elbrus United StatesKauai United StatesUS Army
MDA Suborbital Target 6 April Successful
Tracking demonstration
7 April
17:31[11]
RussiaSoyuz-FG KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaSoyuz TMA-10 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS Expedition 15 21 October
10:36
Successful
Manned flight with three cosmonauts, including a paying space tourist
9 April
22:54[11]
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesILS
CanadaAnik F3 Telesat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
Ka-band transmitter malfunction
11 April
03:27[11]
ChinaLong March 2C-III ChinaTaiyuan LC-1 ChinaCNSA
ChinaHaiyang-1B CAST Sun-synchronous Oceanography In orbit Operational
12 April
05:32[4]
IndiaAgni-III IndiaIntegrated Test Range IndiaIDRDL
IndiaRe-entry vehicle IDRDL Suborbital Missile test 12 April Successful
13 April
20:11[11]
ChinaLong March 3A ChinaXichang LA-3 ChinaCNSA
ChinaCompass-M1 (Beidou-2A) CNSA Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
17 April
06:46:34[11]
UkraineDnepr-1 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 109/95 RussiaISC Kosmotras
EgyptEgyptSat 1 NARS Sun-synchronous Observation In orbit Operational
Saudi ArabiaSaudisat-3 RSRI Sun-synchronous Scientific In orbit Operational
Saudi ArabiaSaudiComsat-3 RSRI Sun-synchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Saudi ArabiaSaudiComsat-4 RSRI Sun-synchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Saudi ArabiaSaudiComsat-5 RSRI Sun-synchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Saudi ArabiaSaudiComsat-6 RSRI Sun-synchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Saudi ArabiaSaudiComsat-7 RSRI Sun-synchronous Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesCP-3 CalPoly Sun-synchronous Technology In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
Operational
United StatesCP-4 CalPoly Sun-synchronous Technology In orbit Operational
United StatesCAPE-1 Lafayette Sun-synchronous Technology In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
ColombiaLibertad 1 Sergio Arboleda Sun-synchronous Technology In orbit Successful
United StatesAeroCube 2 Aerospace Corporation Sun-synchronous Technology In orbit Spacecraft failure
United StatesCSTB-1 Boeing Sun-synchronous Technology In orbit Operational
United StatesMAST Tethers Unlimited Sun-synchronous Technology In orbit Operational
CP-3, CP-4, CAPE-1, Libertad 1, AeroCube 2, CSTB-1, and MAST in P-POD containers, problems with power supply of CAPE-1; Libertad 1 deactivated following completion of mission; AeroCube 2 suffered solar panel/converter malfunction;[12] CP-3 mission affected by communications system reliability issues[13]
23 April
10:00[11]
IndiaPSLV-CA IndiaSatish Dhawan SLP IndiaISRO
ItalyAGILE ASI Low Earth GR Astronomy In orbit Operational
IndiaAAM ISRO Low Earth Technology In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of PSLV-CA
24 April
06:48[14]
United StatesMinotaur I United StatesMARS Pad 0B United StatesOrbital Sciences
United StatesNFIRE MDA Low Earth Missile defence In orbit Operational
25 April
20:26:00[14]
United StatesPegasus-XL United StatesL-1011, Vandenberg United StatesOrbital Sciences
United StatesAIM (SMEX 9) NASA Low Earth Aeronomy In orbit Operational
26 April
21:31[4]
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesKauai United StatesUS Navy
Target US Navy Suborbital Target 26 April Successful
Intercepted by SM-3
26 April
21:32[4]
United StatesRIM-161 Standard Missile 3 United StatesUSS Lake Erie, Kauai United StatesUS Navy
Interceptor US Navy Suborbital ABM test 26 April Successful
Intercepted Terrier-Orion
28 April
14:56[4]
United StatesSpaceLoft XL United StatesSpaceport America United StatesUP Aerospace
United StatesLegacy Celestis Suborbital Space burial 28 April Successful
United StatesLaunchQuest CCAT/NALI Suborbital Student research 28 April Successful
United StatesRocketSat II NASA/Colorado Suborbital Technology 28 April Successful
United StatesSeeds Epsori Space Systems Suborbital Biological 28 April Successful
United StatesAntimatter/Space2O MEI Suborbital Drink ingredients 28 April Successful
United StatesCommemorative items Astrata
RocketFoto
Astrax
Suborbital 28 April Successful
Recoverable sounding launch to an apogee of 117 kilometres, Legacy included remains of Astronaut Gordon Cooper and actor James Doohan, bad weather delayed recovery

May[edit]

4 May
22:29[14]
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
LuxembourgAstra 1L SES Astra Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesGalaxy 17 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
12 May
03:25:38[14]
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-60 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 25 September
19:48
Successful
ISS flight 25P
13 May
16:01[14]
ChinaLong March 3B/E ChinaXichang LA-2 ChinaCNSA
NigeriaNigComSat-1 NASRDA Service: Geosynchronous
Now: Graveyard
Communications In orbit Spacecraft failure
Maiden flight of Long March 3B/E, first African geosynchronous communication satellite, retired due to power system malfunction in November 2008.[15]
15 May[4] United StatesUGM-133 Trident II United StatesETR, USS Tennessee United StatesUS Navy
United StatesFCET-37 US Navy Suborbital SLBM test 15 May Successful
15 May[4] United StatesUGM-133 Trident II United StatesETR, USS Tennessee United StatesUS Navy
United StatesFCET-37 US Navy Suborbital SLBM test 15 May Successful
25 May
07:12[17]
ChinaLong March 2D ChinaJiuquan LA-4/SLS-2 ChinaCNSA
ChinaYaogan 2 CNSA Sun-synchronous Earth imaging In orbit Operational
ChinaZheda PiXing-1 (MEMS-Pico) Zhejiang University Sun-synchronous Technology In orbit Operational
100th successful Chinese orbital launch,[16] MEMS-Pico conducted microelectronic research
25 May
13:15
United StatesUGM-27 Polaris (STARS) United StatesKodiak United StatesSandia
FTG-03 Target MDA Suborbital ABM Target 25 May Failure
Did not reach correct altitude, GMD-OBV interceptor not launched[18]
29 May
10:20[4]
RussiaRS-24 RussiaPlesetsk RussiaRVSN
RVSN Suborbital Missile test 29 May Successful
Maiden flight of RS-24 missile
29 May
20:31:30[17]
RussiaSoyuz-FG/Fregat KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 European UnionRussiaStarsem
United StatesGlobalstar 65 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesGlobalstar 69 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesGlobalstar 71 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesGlobalstar 72 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
31 May
16:08[17]
ChinaLong March 3A ChinaXichang LA-2 ChinaCNSA
ChinaSinosat-3 Sinosat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
100th flight of Long March carrier rocket

June[edit]

7 June
18:00[17]
RussiaSoyuz-U RussiaPlesetsk Site 16/2 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2427 (Kobal't-M) VKS Low Earth Reconnaissance 22 August
21:00
Successful
8 June
02:34:01[17]
United StatesDelta II 7420-10 United StatesVandenberg SLC-2W United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
ItalyCOSMO-1 ASI[19] Sun-synchronous Imaging In orbit Operational
8 June
23:38:04[17]
United StatesSpace Shuttle Atlantis United StatesKennedy Space Center LC-39A United StatesUnited Space Alliance
United StatesSTS-117 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 22 June
19:49:38
Successful
United NationsITS S3/4 Truss NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
Manned orbital flight with 7 astronauts, ISS crew rotation
10 June IsraelShavit-2 IsraelPalmachim IsraelIsrael Aerospace Industries
IsraelOfeq-7 IAI/Israeli military Low Earth (retrograde) Reconnaissance In orbit Operational[20]
Maiden flight of Shavit-2
15 June
02:14[17]
UkraineDnepr-1 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 109/95 RussiaISC Kosmotras
GermanyTerraSAR-X DLR Low Earth Radar imaging In orbit Operational
15 June
02:45[4]
United StatesTalos-Castor AustraliaWoomera AustraliaDSTO
AustraliaHyShot/HYCAUSE DSTO Suborbital Hypersonic research 15 June Successful
15 June
15:04[17]
United StatesAtlas V 401 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-41 United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesUSA-194 (NOSS-3-4A) NRO Low Earth Ocean surveillance In orbit Partial launch failure
Operational
United StatesUSA-194 (NOSS-3-4B) NRO Low Earth Ocean surveillance In orbit Partial launch failure
Operational
NRO Launch 30R, placed in incorrect orbit due to premature cutoff of Centaur upper stage,[21] spacecraft corrected using their own thrusters, reducing lifespan
15 June[4] United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesKauai United StatesUS Navy
United StatesARAV US Navy Suborbital Target 15 June Successful
15 June[4] United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesKauai United StatesUS Navy
United StatesARAV US Navy Suborbital Target 15 June Successful
20 June United StatesMEI-F3 United StatesLas Cruces United StatesMEI
United StatesRocketSat III NASA/Colorado Suborbital Technology 20 June Successful
United StatesAntimatter/Space2O MEI Suborbital Drink ingredients 20 June Successful
21 June[4] United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesWhite Sands NASA
United StatesST-5000/CACS NASA/NSROC Suborbital Test rocket 21 June Successful
21 June[4] FranceM51 FranceBiscarrosse, Submarine FranceFOST
FOST Suborbital Missile test 21 June Successful
23 June
02:40[4]
United StatesCastor 4B United StatesKauai United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital Target 23 June Successful
Intercepted by SM-3
23 June
02:44[4]
United StatesRIM-161 Standard Missile 3 United StatesUSS Decatur, Kauai United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital ABM test 23 June Successful
Intercepted Castor 4B
28 June[4] RussiaRSM-56 Bulava RussiaWhite Sea, Submarine RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 28 June Successful
28 June
15:02[22]
UkraineDnepr-1 RussiaDombarovskiy RussiaISC Kosmotras
United StatesGenesis II Bigelow Aerospace Low Earth Technology In orbit Operational
Experimental inflatable module
29 June
10:00[22]
UkraineZenit-2M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 45/1 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2428 (Tselina-2) VKS Low Earth ELINT In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Zenit-2M

July[edit]

2 July
19:38[22]
RussiaKosmos-3M RussiaPlesetsk Site 132/1 RussiaCOSMOS International
GermanySAR-Lupe-2 Bundeswehr Low Earth (Polar) Radar reconnaissance In orbit Operational
5 July
12:08[22]
ChinaLong March 3B ChinaXichang LA-2 ChinaCNSA
ChinaChinasat-6B ChinaSatcom Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
7 July
01:16:00[22]
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M Enhanced KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
United StatesDirecTV-10 DirecTV Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Proton-M Enhanced[23]
19 July[4] BrazilVSB-30 (306) BrazilAlcântara BrazilAEB
BrazilCuma II INPE Suborbital Microgravity 19 July Partial spacecraft failure
Parachute or flotation system malfunction prevented recovery

August[edit]

2 August
17:33:48[24]
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-61 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics
Technology
22 January 2008
19:52
Successful
ISS flight 26P, Remained in orbit after undocking to conduct technological experiments
3 August
22:51:20[4]
United StatesTerrier-Orion NorwayAndøya United StatesNASA
United StatesMASS 1 NASA/Colorado Suborbital Atmospheric 3 August Successful
3 August
23:22[4]
United StatesNike Orion NorwayAndøya GermanyDLR
NorwayGermanyFranceECOMA 3 ARR, DLR, IAP Suborbital Atmospheric 3 August Successful
Apogee: 126.5 kilometres (78.6 mi)
4 August
09:26:34[24]
United StatesDelta II 7925 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17A United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesPhoenix NASA Heliocentric Mars lander 25 May 2008
23:38
Successful
Landed on Mars, discovered water there, last signal from spacecraft received on 2 November 2008
6 August
22:56[4]
United StatesTerrier-Orion NorwayAndøya United StatesNASA
United StatesMASS 2 NASA/Colorado Suborbital Atmospheric 6 August Successful
7 August[4] RussiaR-29R Volna RussiaPacific Ocean, Delta III submarine RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 7 August Successful
8 August
22:36:42[25]
United StatesSpace Shuttle Endeavour United StatesKennedy Space Center LC-39A United StatesUnited Space Alliance
United StatesSTS-118 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 21 August
16:32
Successful
United StatesSpaceHab LSM NASA/SpaceHab Low Earth (STS) Logistics Successful
United NationsS5 Truss NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
Manned orbital flight with seven astronauts, final flight of SpaceHab module
13 August
05:45[4]
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands LC-36 United StatesNASA
United StatesLIDOS 2 NASA/JHU Suborbital Ultraviolet astronomy 13 August Successful
14 August
23:44[25]
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 European UnionArianespace
United StatesSpaceway 3 Hughes Geostationary Communications In orbit Operational
JapanBSat 3a BSAT Geostationary Communications In orbit Operational
23 August
08:31[4]
United StatesChimera (Minuteman/Minotaur II) United StatesVandenberg LF-06 United StatesOrbital Sciences
United StatesNFIRE 2a MDA Suborbital Target 23 August
09:01
Successful
Tracking target for the NFIRE spacecraft

September[edit]

2 September
10:20
JapanS-520 JapanUchinoura JapanJAXA
JapanWIND JAXA/Kochi Suborbital Thermospheric 2 September Successful
2 September
12:51[4]
IndiaGSLV IndiaSatish Dhawan SLP IndiaISRO
IndiaINSAT-4CR ISRO Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Partial launch failure
Partial spacecraft failure
Operational
Apogee lower and inclination higher than expected, due to carrier rocket underperformance,[26] lifespan further reduced by drift following tracking failure. 5 years of operational life lost.[27]
5 September
22:43[4]
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
JapanJCSAT-11 JSAT Intended: Geostationary Communications ~+135 seconds Launch failure
Second stage failed to separate due to damaged cabling.[28]
6 September
21:09
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesWallops Flight Facility United StatesNASA
United StatesPLAYER NASA Suborbital Technology 6 September
21:19
Successful
11 September
13:05[4]
RussiaKosmos-3M RussiaPlesetsk Site 132/1 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2429 (Parus) VKS Low Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
14 September
01:31:01[4]
JapanH-IIA 2022 JapanTanegashima LA-Y1 JapanMitsubishi
JapanKaguya (SELENE) JAXA Selenocentric Lunar orbiter In orbit Operational
JapanOkina (RStar) JAXA Selenocentric Lunar orbiter 12 February 2009
08:46
Successful
JapanOuna (VStar) JAXA Selenocentric Lunar orbiter In orbit Operational
14 September
11:00[4]
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
European UnionRussiaFoton-M3 Roskosmos/ESA Low Earth Scientific 26 September Successful
European UnionYES2 Low Earth Technology development Unknown Spacecraft failure
YES2 tether may have failed to deploy fully. Satellite recovery failed.[29]
18 September
18:35[4]
United StatesDelta II 7920-10C United StatesVandenberg SLC-2W United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesWorldView-1 DigitalGlobe Low Earth Imaging In orbit Operational
75th consecutive successful Delta II launch.
19 September
03:26[4]
ChinaLong March 4B ChinaTaiyuan LC-1 ChinaCNSA
ChinaBrazilCBERS-2B (Ziyuan 1-02B) CASC/INPE Syn-synchronous Remote sensing In orbit Operational
27 September
11:34[30]
United StatesDelta II 7925H United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17B United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesDawn NASA Heliocentric
Then: Ceres orbit
Then: Vesta orbit
Asteroid research In orbit Operational
Will explore dwarf planet Ceres and asteroid 4 Vesta, Ceres was designated as an asteroid during mission planning
28 September
20:16
United StatesPolaris (STARS) United StatesKodiak United StatesSandia
FTG-03a MDA Suborbital Target 28 September Successful
Intercepted by Ground Based Interceptor
28 September
20:18
United StatesGround Based Interceptor United StatesVandenberg LF-23 United StatesMDA
FTG-03a MDA Suborbital ABM test 28 September Successful
Intercepted Polaris (STARS)

October[edit]

5 October
05:50
IndiaAgni-I IndiaIntegrated Test Range IndiaIDRDL
IDRDL Suborbital Missile test 5 October Successful
5 October
22:02:26[30]
European UnionAriane 5GS FranceKourou ELA-3 European UnionArianespace
United StatesIntelsat 11 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
AustraliaOptus D2 Optus Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
10 October
13:22:39[30]
RussiaSoyuz-FG KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaSoyuz TMA-11 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS Expedition 16 19 April 2008 Successful
Manned orbital flight with 3 cosmonauts, first Malaysian in space
11 October
00:22[30]
United StatesAtlas V 421 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-41 United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesUSA-195 (WGS-1) US Air Force Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Atlas V 421
17 October
12:23:00[31]
United StatesDelta II 7925-9.5 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17A United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesUSA-196 (GPS 2R-17/M4) US Air Force Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
700th flight of Thor rocket (Variant used as first stage).
20 October
20:12:25[31]
RussiaSoyuz-FG/Fregat KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 European UnionRussiaStarsem
United StatesGlobalstar 66 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesGlobalstar 67 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesGlobalstar 68 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesGlobalstar 70 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
23 October
04:39[31]
RussiaMolniya-M/2BL RussiaPlesetsk RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2430 (Oko) VKS Molniya Early warning In orbit Operational
23 October
15:38:19[31]
United StatesSpace Shuttle Discovery United StatesKennedy Space Center LC-39A United StatesUnited Space Alliance
United StatesSTS-120 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 7 November
18:01
Successful
United NationsHarmony (Node 2) NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
Manned orbital flight with 7 astronauts, crew rotation
24 October
10:05[31]
ChinaLong March 3A ChinaXichang LA-3 ChinaCNSA
ChinaChang'e 1 CNSA Selenocentric Lunar orbiter 1 March 2009
08:13[32]
Successful
First Chinese lunar probe
26 October
07:35:24[31]
RussiaProton-K/DM-2 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 81/24 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2431 (GLONASS-M) VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
RussiaKosmos 2432 (GLONASS-M) VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
RussiaKosmos 2433 (GLONASS-M) VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
29 October RussiaRS-18 UR-100N KazakhstanBaikonur RussiaRVSN
RVSN Suborbital Missile test 29 October Successful
30 October
04:12:52
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWallops Flight Facility Pad 1 United StatesNASA
United StatesEARLE NASA/Texas Suborbital Ionospheric 30 October
04:26:17
Successful

November[edit]

1 November
00:51:44[33]
RussiaKosmos-3M RussiaPlesetsk Site 132/1 RussiaCOSMOS International
GermanySAR-Lupe 3 Bundeswehr Low Earth (polar) Radar reconnaissance In orbit Operational
GermanyRubin-7 OHB System Low Earth (polar) Technology In orbit Operational
6 November
18:00
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands LC-36 United StatesNASA
United StatesEUNIS NASA Suborbital Solar 6 November Successful
11 November
01:50[33]
United StatesDelta IV-H 9250H United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-37B United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesUSA-197 (DSP-23) DoD Geosynchronous Missile defence In orbit Spacecraft failure[34]
Final DSP satellite
Stopped transmitting in September 2008[34]
11 November
22:48[33]
ChinaLong March 4C (4B-II) ChinaTaiyuan LC-1 ChinaCNSA
ChinaYaogan 3 CNSA Sun-synchronous Remote sensing In orbit Operational
First launch of Long March 4C after redesignation
14 November
22:06[33]
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 European UnionArianespace
United KingdomSkynet 5B Paradigm/MoD Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
BrazilStar One C1 Star One Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Record mass to GTO – 9,535 kg (21,021 lb)[35]
17 November
22:39:47[33]
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
SwedenSirius 4 SES Sirius Geostationary Communications In orbit Operational

December[edit]

8 December RussiaRT-2UTTH Topol-M RussiaKapustin Yar RussiaRVSN
RVSN Suborbital Missile test 8 December Successful
9 December
00:16[36]
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 81/24 RussiaVKS
RussiaGlobus-1M #11L (Raduga-1M 1) VKS Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
9 December
02:31:42[36]
United StatesDelta II 7420-10 United StatesVandenberg SLC-2W United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
ItalyCOSMO-2 ASI[19] Sun-synchronous Reconnaissance In orbit Operational
10 December
09:00:00
CanadaBlack Brant XII NorwayAndøya United StatesNASA
United StatesTRICE-High NASA/UoI Suborbital Electrodynamics 10 December Successful
10 December
09:02:00
CanadaBlack Brant XII NorwayAndøya United StatesNASA
United StatesTRICE-Low NASA/UoI Suborbital Electrodynamics 10 December Successful
10 December
22:05[36]
United StatesAtlas V 401 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-41 United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesUSA-198 (SDS-3-5) NRO Molniya Communications In orbit Operational
NRO Launch 24
14 December
13:17:34[36]
RussiaSoyuz-FG/Fregat KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 European UnionRussiaStarsem
CanadaRADARSAT 2 MDA Corporation Sun-synchronous Radar imaging In orbit Operational
17 December
22:05[37]
United StatesCastor 4B United StatesKauai United StatesUS Navy
United StatesMock warhead US Navy Suborbital Target 17 December Successful
Intercepted by SM-3
17 December
22:08[37]
United StatesRIM-161 Standard Missile 3 JapanJDS Kongō JapanJMSDF
JMSDF Suborbital ABM test 17 December Successful
Intercepted Castor 4B, first Japanese ABM test (Using American technology)
17 December RussiaR-29RM Sineva (RSM-54) RussiaBarents Sea, K-114 RussiaVMF
RussiaRe-entry vehicles VMF Suborbital Missile test 17 December Successful
Multiple re-entry vehicles, impacted Kura Test Range
17 December BrazilVS-30 BrazilBarreira do Inferno BrazilAEB
BrazilArgentinaAngicos AEB/CONAE Suborbital Microgravity 17 December Successful
20 December
20:04:00[36]
United StatesDelta II 7925-9.5 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17A United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesUSA-199 (GPS 2R-18/M5) US Air Force Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
21 December
21:41:55[36]
European UnionAriane 5GS FranceKourou ELA-3 European UnionArianespace
United StatesJapanHorizons-2 Intelsat/JSAT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
MauritiusRascom-QAF 1 RascomSTAR-QAF Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
Operational
Helium leak affected early operations of Rascom-QAF 1,[38] reducing operational lifetime by 13 years.
23 December
07:12:41[39]
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-62 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 15 February 2008
10:29
Successful
ISS flight 27P
25 December
10:00
RussiaR-29RM Sineva (RSM-54) RussiaBarents Sea, K-114 RussiaVMF
RussiaRe-entry vehicles VMF Suborbital Missile test 25 December Successful
Multiple re-entry vehicles, Impacted Kura Test Range
25 December
13:10
RussiaRS-24 RussiaPlesetsk RussiaRVSN
RussiaRe-entry vehicles RVSN Suborbital Missile test 25 December Successful
Multiple re-entry vehicles
25 December
19:32[39]
RussiaProton-M/DM-2 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 81/24 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2434 (GLONASS-M) VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
RussiaKosmos 2435 (GLONASS-M) VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
RussiaKosmos 2436 (GLONASS-M) VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Proton-M/DM-2

Deep Space Rendezvous[edit]

Date (GMT) Spacecraft Event Remarks
13 January Cassini 23rd flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
29 January Cassini 24th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 2,775 kilometres (1,724 mi)
22 February Cassini 25th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 953 kilometres (592 mi)
25 February Rosetta Flyby of Mars Gravity assist
28 February New Horizons Flyby of Jupiter Gravity assist
10 March Cassini 26th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 956 kilometres (594 mi)
26 March Cassini 27th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 953 kilometres (592 mi)
10 April Cassini 28th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 951 kilometres (591 mi)
26 April Cassini 29th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 951 kilometres (591 mi)
12 May Cassini 30th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
28 May Cassini 31stflyby of Titan Closest approach: 2,425 kilometres (1,507 mi)
5 June MESSENGER 2nd flyby of Venus Gravity assist; Closest approach: 338 kilometres (210 mi)
13 June Cassini 32nd flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
29 June Cassini 33rd flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,942 kilometres (1,207 mi)
19 July Cassini 34thflyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,302 kilometres (809 mi)
30 August Cassini Flyby of Rhea Closest approach: 5,100 kilometres (3,200 mi)
31 August Cassini 35th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 3,227 kilometres (2,005 mi)
10 September Cassini Flyby of Iapetus Closest approach: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
2 October Cassini 36th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
3 October[40] Kaguya Selenocentric orbit injection
5 November Chang'e 1 Selenocentric orbit injection
13 November Rosetta 2nd flyby of the Earth Mistaken for asteroid, given the designation 2007 VN84
19 November Cassini 37th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
5 December Cassini 38th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
20 December Cassini 39th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 953 kilometres (592 mi)
31 December Deep Impact (EPOXI) Flyby of Earth Closest approach: 15,566 kilometres (9,672 mi)
Distant, non-targeted flybys of Dione, Enceladus, Mimas, Tethys and Titan by Cassini occurred throughout the year.

EVAs[edit]

Start date/time Duration End time Spacecraft Crew Function Remarks
31 January
15:14
7 hours
55 minutes 
23:09 Expedition 14 
ISS Quest
United StatesMichael Lopez-Alegria
United StatesSunita Williams
Reconfigured Destiny cooling system, connected SSPTS, secured P6 starboard radiator, disconnected EAS.[41]
4 February
13:38
7 hours
11 minutes
20:49 Expedition 14
ISS Quest
United StatesMichael Lopez-Alegria
United StatesSunita Williams
Completed Destiny cooling system reconfiguration and EAS disconnection, photographed P6 inboard solar array, continued SSPTS installation.[42]
8 February
13:26
6 hours
40 minutes
20:06 Expedition 14
ISS Quest
United StatesMichael Lopez-Alegria
United StatesSunita Williams
Removed and jettisoned P3 thermal covers, install P3 attachment point, remove P5 launch restraints, continued SSPTS installation.[43]
22 February
10:27
6 hours
18 minutes
16:45 Expedition 14
ISS Pirs
RussiaMikhail Tyurin
United StatesMichael Lopez-Alegria
Retracted an antenna at the aft port of the Zvezda, photographed a satellite navigation antenna, and replaced a Russian materials experiment, inspected and photographed an antenna for the ATV, photographed a German robotics experiment, and inspected, remated, and photographed hardware connectors.[44]
30 May
19:05
5 hours
25 minutes
31 May
00:30
Expedition 15
ISS Pirs
RussiaFyodor Yurchikhin
RussiaOleg Kotov
Installed Service Module Debris Protection (SMDP) panels and rerouted a Global Positioning System antenna cable.[45]
6 June
14:23
5 hours
37 minutes
20:00 Expedition 15
ISS Pirs
RussiaFyodor Yurchikhin
RussiaOleg Kotov
Installed a section of Ethernet cable on the Zarya module, installed additional Service Module Debris Protection (SMDP) panels on Zvezda, and deployed a Russian scientific experiment.[46]
11 June
20:02
6 hours
15 minutes
12 June
02:17
STS-117
ISS Quest
United StatesJames F. Reilly
United StatesJohn D. Olivas
Began the S3/S4 Truss installation.[47]
13 June
18:28
7 hours
16 minutes
14 June
01:44
STS-117
ISS Quest
United StatesPatrick G. Forrester
United StatesSteven Swanson
Assisted in retraction of the solar panels on the P6 Truss. Completed the S3/S4 truss installation. Partial failure due to the S3/S4 SARJ motor control circuits being wired in reverse, so some launch restraints were left in place to prevent the possibility of undesired rotation.[48]
15 June
17:24
7 hours
58 minutes
16 June
01:22
STS-117
ISS Quest
United StatesJames F. Reilly
United StatesJohn D. Olivas
Repaired the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pod thermal blanket, finished the P6 solar array retraction, and installed a hydrogen ventilation valve onto Destiny.[49]
17 June
16:25
6 hours
29 minutes
22:54 STS-117
ISS Quest
United StatesPatrick G. Forrester
United StatesSteven Swanson
Retrieved a television camera and its support structure from an ESP attached to Quest, and installed it on the S3 truss, verified the Drive Lock Assembly (DLA) 2 configuration, and removed the last six SARJ launch restraints. Installed a computer network cable on Unity, opened the hydrogen vent valve on Destiny, and tethered two orbital debris shield panels on Zvezda.[50]
23 July
10:25
7 hours
41 minutes
18:06 Expedition 15
ISS Quest
United StatesClayton Anderson
RussiaFyodor Yurchikhin
Replaced components for the Mobile Transporter's redundant power system, jettisoned an ammonia tank and flight support equipment, and cleaned the Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) on the nadir port of Unity.[51][52]
11 August
16:28
6 hours
17 minutes
23:45 STS-118
ISS Quest
United StatesRichard Mastracchio
CanadaDafydd Williams
Attached the Starboard 5 (S5) segment of the station’s truss, and retracted the forward heat-rejecting radiator from the station’s Port 6 (P6) truss.[53]
13 August
15:32
6 hours
28 minutes
22:00 STS-118
ISS Quest
United StatesRichard Mastracchio
CanadaDafydd Williams
Removed the new Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) from the shuttle's payload bay and installed it onto the Z1 truss. Installed the failed CMG onto an External Stowage Platform (ESP-2).[54]
15 August
14:38
5 hours
28 minutes
20:05 STS-118
ISS Quest
United StatesRichard Mastracchio
United StatesClayton Anderson
Relocated two CETA carts around the Mobile Transporter and an antenna base from the P6 truss to P1, and installed a new transponder and signal processor for an S-band communications upgrade.[55] Mastracchio noted a hole on the thumb of his left glove and returned to the airlock as a precautionary measure.
18 August
14:17
5 hours
2 minutes
19:02 STS-118
ISS Quest
CanadaDafydd Williams
United StatesClayton Anderson
Retrieved Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) containers 3 and 4, installed the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) Boom Stand, installed an External Wireless Instrumentation System (EWIS) antenna, and secured Z1 gimbal locks.[56]
26 October
10:02
6 hours
14 minutes
16:16 STS-120
ISS Quest
United StatesScott E. Parazynski
United StatesDouglas H. Wheelock
Installed the new Harmony module in its temporary location, retrieved the S-Band Antenna Support Assembly, and prepared for the relocation of the P6 truss by disconnecting fluid lines on the P6/Z1 truss segments.[57]
28 October
09:32
6 hours
33 minutes
16:05 STS-120
ISS Quest
United StatesScott E. Parazysnki
United StatesDaniel M. Tani
Disconnected the Z1-to-P6 umbilicals, detached P6 from Z1, configured the S1 radiator, installed handrails onto Harmony, and inspected the S4 starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ).[58]
30 October
08:45
7 hours
8 minutes
15:53 STS-120
ISS Quest
United StatesScott E. Parazysnki
United StatesDouglas H. Wheelock
Attached P6 to P5, installed P6/P5 umbilical connections, reconfigured S1 following its redeployment, and inspected the port SARJ.[59]
3 November
10:03
7 hours
19 minutes
17:22 STS-120
ISS Quest
United StatesScott E. Parazysnki
United StatesDouglas H. Wheelock
Inspection and repair of the P6 solar array.[60]
9 November
09:54
6 hours
55 minutes
16:49 Expedition 16
ISS Quest
United StatesPeggy Whitson
RussiaYuri Malenchenko
Disconnected and stored the Station-to-Shuttle Power Transfer System cables, stored the PMA-2 umbilical, and stowed a Harmony node avionics umbilical into a temporary position.[61][62]
20 November
10:10
7 hours
16 minutes
17:26 Expedition 16
ISS Quest
United StatesPeggy Whitson
United StatesDaniel M. Tani
External configuration of PMA-2 and Harmony: Fluid, electrical, and data lines attached, avionics lines hooked up, heater cables attached, and relocated a fluid tray.[63]
24 November
09:50
7 hours
4 minutes
16:54 Expedition 16
ISS Quest
United StatesPeggy Whitson
United StatesDaniel M. Tani
Completion of fluid, electrical, and data line hookups for PMA-2 and Harmony. Loop B Fluid Tray connected to the port side of the Destiny laboratory. Inspected and photographed the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) to assist with troubleshooting on the ground.[64]
18 December
09:50
6 hours
56 minutes
16:46 Expedition 16
ISS Quest
United StatesPeggy Whitson
United StatesDaniel M. Tani
Inspected the S4 starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ), and a Beta Gimbal Assembly (BGA).[65][66] 100th EVA in support of the ISS.
Whitson became the female astronaut with the most EVAs and the most time spent in EVA.[67][68]

Orbital launch summary[edit]

By country[edit]

2007 Launches.svg
  China (PRC)
  Europe
  India
  International
  Israel
  Japan
  Russia/CIS
Orbital launch attempts by country in 2007
Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
European Union Europe 6 6 0 0
 India 3 2 0 1
United Nations International 1 0 1 0 Sea Launch
 Israel 1 1 0 0
 Japan 2 2 0 0
 People's Republic of China 10 10 0 0
 Russia/Commonwealth of Independent States CIS 26 25 1 0
 United States 19 17 1 1

By rocket[edit]

By family[edit]

Family Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Ariane  Europe 6 6 0 0
Atlas  United States 4 3 0 1
Delta  United States 9 9 0 0
Energia  Ukraine 2 1 1 0
Falcon  United States 1 0 1 0
GSLV  India 1 0 0 1
H-II  Japan 2 2 0 0
Long March  People's Republic of China 10 10 0 0
Jericho  France
 Israel
1 1 0 0
Minotaur  United States 1 1 0 0
Pegasus  United States 1 1 0 0
R07R-7  Russia 12 12 0 0
R14R-14  Russia 3 3 0 0
R36R-36  Ukraine 3 3 0 0
PSLV  India 2 2 0 0
Space Shuttle  United States 4 4 0 0
Universal Rocket  Russia 7 6 1 0

By type[edit]

Rocket Country Family Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Ariane 5  Europe Ariane 6 6 0 0
Atlas V  United States Atlas 4 3 0 1
Delta II  United States Delta 8 8 0 0
Delta IV  United States Delta 1 1 0 0
Dnepr  Ukraine R-36 3 3 0 0
Falcon 1  United States Falcon 1 0 1 0
GSLV  India GSLV 1 0 0 1
H-IIA  Japan H-II 2 2 0 0
Kosmos  Russia R-12/R-14 3 3 0 0
Long March 2  People's Republic of China Long March 2 2 0 0
Long March 3  People's Republic of China Long March 6 6 0 0
Long March 4  People's Republic of China Long March 2 2 0 0
Minotaur I  United States Minotaur 1 1 0 0
Molniya  Russia R-7 1 1 0 0
Pegasus  United States Pegasus 1 1 0 0
Proton  Russia Universal Rocket 7 6 1 0
PSLV  India PSLV 2 2 0 0
Shavit  Israel Jericho 1 1 0 0
Soyuz  Russia R-7 11 11 0 0
Space Shuttle  United States Space Shuttle 3 3 0 0
Zenit  Ukraine Energia 2 1 1 0

By configuration[edit]

Rocket Country Type Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Ariane 5ECA  Europe Ariane 5 4 4 0 0
Ariane 5GS  Europe Ariane 5 2 2 0 0
Atlas V 401  United States Atlas V 3 2 0 1
Atlas V 421  United States Atlas V 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
Delta II 7420  United States Delta II 2 2 0 0
Delta II 7920  United States Delta II 1 1 0 0
Delta II 7925  United States Delta II 4 4 0 0
Delta II 7925H  United States Delta II 1 1 0 0 Retired
Delta IV-H  United States Delta IV 1 1 0 0
Dnepr-1  Ukraine Dnepr 3 3 0 0
Falcon 1  United States Falcon 1 1 0 1 0
GSLV Mk I(b)  India GSLV 1 0 0 1
H-IIA 2022  Japan H-IIA 1 1 0 0
H-IIA 2024  Japan H-IIA 1 1 0 0
Kosmos-3M  Russia Kosmos 3 3 0 0
Long March 2C  People's Republic of China Long March 2 1 1 0 0
Long March 2D  People's Republic of China Long March 2 1 1 0 0
Long March 3A  People's Republic of China Long March 3 4 4 0 0
Long March 3B  People's Republic of China Long March 3 1 1 0 0
Long March 3B/E  People's Republic of China Long March 3 1 1 0 0
Long March 4B  People's Republic of China Long March 4 1 1 0 0
Long March 4C  People's Republic of China Long March 4 1 1 0 0 Long March 4B-II
Minotaur I  United States Minotaur I 1 1 0 0
Molniya-M/2BL  Russia Molniya 1 1 0 0
Pegasus-XL  United States Pegasus 1 1 0 0
Proton-K/DM-2  Russia Proton 1 1 0 0
Proton-M/DM-2  Russia Proton 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
Proton-M/Briz-M  Russia Proton 5 4 1 0
PSLV  India PSLV 1 1 0 0
PSLV-CA  India PSLV 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
Shavit-2  Israel Shavit 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
Soyuz-FG  Russia Soyuz 2 2 0 0
Soyuz-FG/Fregat  Russia Soyuz 3 3 0 0
Soyuz-U  Russia Soyuz 6 6 0 0
Space Shuttle  United States Space Shuttle 3 3 0 0
Zenit-2M  Ukraine Zenit 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
Zenit-3SL  Ukraine Zenit 1 0 1 0

By launch site[edit]

Site Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Baikonur  Kazakhstan 20 19 1 0
Cape Canaveral  United States 10 9 0 1
Dombarovsky  Russia 1 1 0 0
Jiuquan  People's Republic of China 1 1 0 0
Kennedy  United States 3 3 0 0
Kwajalein Atoll  Marshall Islands 1 0 1 0
Kourou  France 6 6 0 0
MARS  United States 1 1 0 0
Ocean Odyssey United Nations International 1 0 1 0 Damaged by explosion
Palmachim  Israel 1 1 0 0
Plesetsk  Russia 5 5 0 0
Satish Dhawan  India 3 2 0 1
Taiyuan  People's Republic of China 3 3 0 0
Tanegashima  Japan 2 2 0 0
Vandenberg  United States 4 4 0 0 One launch used Stargazer aircraft
Xichang  People's Republic of China 6 6 0 0

By orbit[edit]

Orbital regime Launches Successes Failures Accidentally
achieved
Remarks
Low Earth orbit 37 36 1 0 9 to ISS
Medium Earth orbit 5 5 0 0
Geosynchronous/transfer 19 17 2 0
High Earth orbit 5 5 0 0 Including lunar transfer and Molniya orbits
Heliocentric orbit 2 2 0 0 Including planetary transfer orbits

References[edit]

Generic references:

Footnotes[edit]

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