2008–09 Serie A

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Serie A
Season 2008–09
Champions Internazionale
Relegated Torino
Reggina
Lecce
Champions League Internazionale
Juventus
Milan
Fiorentina
Europa League Genoa
Roma
Lazio
Matches played 380
Goals scored 988 (2.6 per match)
Top goalscorer Zlatan Ibrahimović
(25 goals)
Biggest home win Sampdoria 5–0 Reggina
Biggest away win Roma 0–4 Inter,
Siena 1–5 Milan,
Palermo 0–4 Catania
Highest scoring Udinese 6–2 Cagliari
Average attendance 25,324

The 2008–09 Serie A (known as the Serie A TIM for sponsorship reasons) was the seventy-seventh season since its establishment. It began on 30 August 2008 and ended on 31 May 2009, with the announcement of the list of fixtures made on 25 July 2008. 20 teams competed in the league, 17 of which returned from the previous season, and three (Chievo, Bologna and Lecce) were promoted from Serie B 2007–08.

20 clubs represented 13 different regions. The most represented region was Lombardy with three teams: Atalanta, Milan and Internazionale. Piedmont, Liguria, Tuscany, Lazio and Sicily featured two teams each while Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Veneto, Emilia-Romagna, Campania, Apulia, Calabria, and Sardinia were represented by one team each. There was a record number of southern teams in the top division with six teams: Cagliari, Catania, Lecce, Napoli, Palermo, and Reggina.

The new match ball was the Nike T90 Omni.

On 16 May 2009, Internazionale won the league by holding an unassailable lead after Milan's loss away to Udinese.

Rule changes[edit]

The 2008–09 season saw new rules relating to the transfer of player registration introduced. Clubs without non-EU players in their squad were allowed three incoming non-EU player transfers (whereas previously only newly promoted clubs could have three). Clubs with one non-EU player were allowed two such transfers and clubs with two non-EU players were permitted one transfer and a further one if they cancelled the registration of one of their non-EU players or that player gained EU nationality. Clubs with three or more non-EU players were given two conditional quotas with the caveat that the release (as opposed to transfer) of two non-EU players as free agent would only allow for one further non-EU signing.[1]

Teams[edit]

Three teams were promoted from Serie B: Chievo, Bologna, and Lecce. The first two earned direct promotion, while Lecce won the promotional playoffs, defeating AlbinoLeffe 2–1 on aggregate in a two-legged playoff final.

Club City Stadium Capacity 2007–08 season
Atalanta B.C. Bergamo Stadio Atleti Azzurri d'Italia 26,393 9th in Serie A
Bologna F.C. 1909 Bologna Stadio Renato Dall'Ara 39,444 2nd in Serie B
Cagliari Calcio Cagliari Stadio Sant'Elia 23,486 14th in Serie A
Calcio Catania Catania Stadio Angelo Massimino 23,420 17th in Serie A
A.C. ChievoVerona Verona Stadio Marcantonio Bentegodi 39,211 Serie B Champions
ACF Fiorentina Florence Stadio Artemio Franchi, Florence 47,282 4th in Serie A
Genoa C.F.C. Genoa Stadio Luigi Ferraris 36,685 10th in Serie A
F.C. Internazionale Milano Milan Stadio Giuseppe Meazza 80,074 Serie A Champions
Juventus F.C. Turin Stadio Olimpico di Torino 27,500 3rd in Serie A
S.S. Lazio Rome Stadio Olimpico 72,700 12th in Serie A
U.S. Lecce Lecce Stadio Via del Mare 33,876 Serie B Playoff Winners
A.C. Milan Milan Stadio Giuseppe Meazza 80,074 5th in Serie A
S.S.C. Napoli Naples Stadio San Paolo 60,240 8th in Serie A
U.S. Città di Palermo Palermo Stadio Renzo Barbera 37,242 11th in Serie A
Reggina Calcio Reggio Calabria Stadio Oreste Granillo 27,454 16th in Serie A
A.S. Roma Rome Stadio Olimpico 72,700 2nd in Serie A
U.C. Sampdoria Genoa Stadio Luigi Ferraris 36,685 6th in Serie A
A.C. Siena Siena Stadio Artemio Franchi, Siena 15,373 13th in Serie A
Torino F.C. Turin Stadio Olimpico di Torino 27,500 15th in Serie A
Udinese Calcio Udine Stadio Friuli 41,652 7th in Serie A

League table[edit]

Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
Head-to-head
1 Internazionale (C) 38 25 9 4 70 32 +38 84 2009–10 UEFA Champions League Group stage
2 Juventus 38 21 11 6 69 37 +32 74 JUV 4–2 MIL
MIL 1–1 JUV
3 Milan 38 22 8 8 70 35 +35 74
4 Fiorentina 38 21 5 12 53 38 +15 68 2009–10 UEFA Champions League Play-off round FIO 1–0 GEN
GEN 3–3 FIO
5 Genoa 38 19 11 8 56 39 +17 68 2009–10 UEFA Europa League Play-off round
6 Roma 38 18 9 11 64 61 +3 63 2009–10 UEFA Europa League Third qualifying round
7 Udinese 38 16 10 12 61 50 +11 58
8 Palermo 38 17 6 15 57 50 +7 57
9 Cagliari 38 15 8 15 49 50 −1 53
10 Lazio 38 15 5 18 46 55 −9 50 2009–10 UEFA Europa League Play-off round 1
11 Atalanta 38 13 8 17 45 48 −3 47
12 Napoli 38 12 10 16 43 45 −2 46 NAP 2–0 SAM
SAM 2–2 NAP
13 Sampdoria 38 11 13 14 49 52 −3 46
14 Siena 38 12 8 18 33 44 −11 44
15 Catania 38 12 7 19 41 51 −10 43
16 Chievo 38 8 14 16 35 49 −14 38
17 Bologna 38 9 10 19 43 62 −19 37
18 Torino (R) 38 8 10 20 37 61 −24 34 Relegation to Serie B
19 Reggina (R) 38 6 13 19 30 62 −32 31
20 Lecce (R) 38 5 15 18 37 67 −30 30

Source: lega-calcio.it (Italian)
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) head-to-head points; 3) head-to-head goal difference; 4) head-to-head goals scored; 5) goal difference; 6) number of goals scored
1Lazio qualified for the play-off round of the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League by winning the 2008–09 Coppa Italia.
(C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (E) = Eliminated; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round.
Only applicable when the season is not finished:
(Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular phase indicated; (RQ) = Qualified to the relegation tournament indicated; (DQ) = Disqualified from tournament.
Head-to-Head: used when head-to-head record is used to rank tied teams.

Results[edit]

Home \ Away[1] ATA BOL CAG CTN CHV FIO GEN INT JUV LAZ LCE MIL NAP PAL REG ROM SAM SIE TOR UDI
Atalanta 0–1 1–0 1–0 0–2 1–2 1–1 3–1 1–3 2–0 0–0 0–1 3–1 2–2 0–1 3–0 4–2 1–0 2–0 3–0
Bologna 0–1 0–1 3–1 1–1 1–3 2–0 1–2 1–2 3–1 2–1 1–4 0–1 1–1 1–2 1–1 3–0 1–4 5–2 0–3
Cagliari 0–1 5–1 1–0 2–0 1–0 0–1 2–1 0–1 1–4 2–0 0–0 2–0 1–0 1–1 2–2 1–0 1–0 0–0 2–0
Catania 1–0 1–2 2–1 1–0 0–2 1–0 0–2 1–2 1–0 1–1 0–2 3–1 2–0 2–0 3–2 2–0 0–3 3–2 0–2
Chievo 1–1 0–0 1–1 1–1 0–2 0–1 2–2 0–2 1–2 1–1 0–1 2–1 1–0 2–1 0–1 1–1 0–2 1–1 1–2
Fiorentina 2–1 1–0 2–1 2–0 2–1 1–0 0–0 1–1 1–0 1–2 0–2 2–1 0–2 3–0 4–1 1–0 1–0 1–0 4–2
Genoa 1–1 1–1 2–1 1–1 2–2 3–3 0–2 3–2 0–1 4–1 2–0 3–2 1–0 4–0 3–1 3–1 1–0 3–0 2–0
Internazionale 4–3 2–1 1–1 2–1 4–2 2–0 0–0 1–0 2–0 1–0 2–1 2–1 2–2 3–0 3–3 1–0 3–0 1–1 1–0
Juventus 2–2 4–1 2–3 1–1 3–3 1–0 4–1 1–1 2–0 2–2 4–2 1–0 1–2 4–0 2–0 1–1 1–0 1–0 1–0
Lazio 0–1 2–0 1–4 1–0 0–3 3–0 1–1 0–3 1–1 1–1 0–3 0–1 1–0 1–0 4–2 2–0 3–0 1–1 1–3
Lecce 2–2 0–0 2–0 2–1 2–0 1–1 0–2 0–3 1–2 0–2 1–1 1–1 1–1 0–0 0–3 1–3 1–1 3–3 2–2
Milan 3–0 1–2 1–0 1–0 1–0 1–0 1–1 1–0 1–1 4–1 2–0 1–0 3–0 1–1 2–3 3–0 2–1 5–1 5–1
Napoli 0–0 1–1 2–2 1–0 3–0 2–1 0–1 1–0 2–1 0–2 3–0 0–0 2–1 3–0 0–3 2–0 2–0 1–2 2–2
Palermo 3–2 4–1 5–1 0–4 3–0 1–3 2–1 0–2 0–2 2–0 5–2 3–1 2–1 1–0 3–1 2–2 2–0 1–0 3–2
Reggina 3–1 2–2 2–1 1–1 0–1 1–1 0–1 2–3 2–2 2–3 2–0 1–2 1–1 0–0 2–2 0–2 1–1 1–1 0–2
Roma 2–0 2–1 3–2 4–3 0–0 1–0 3–0 0–4 1–4 1–0 3–2 2–2 1–1 2–1 3–0 2–0 1–0 3–2 1–1
Sampdoria 1–0 2–0 3–3 3–0 1–1 0–1 0–1 1–1 0–0 3–1 3–2 2–1 2–2 0–2 5–0 2–2 2–2 1–0 2–2
Siena 1–0 1–1 2–0 1–1 0–2 1–0 0–0 1–2 0–3 2–0 1–2 1–5 2–1 1–0 1–0 1–0 0–0 1–0 1–1
Torino 2–1 1–1 0–1 2–1 1–1 1–4 2–3 1–3 0–1 1–3 3–0 2–2 1–0 1–0 0–0 0–1 1–3 1–0 1–0
Udinese 3–0 1–0 6–2 1–1 0–1 3–1 2–2 0–1 2–1 3–3 2–0 2–1 0–0 3–1 0–1 3–1 1–1 2–1 2–0

Source: lega-calcio.it (Italian)
^ The home team is listed in the left-hand column.
Colours: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.
For coming matches, an a indicates there is an article about the match.

Top goalscorers[edit]

Source: gazzetta.it (Italian)

25 goals
24 goals
19 goals
16 goals
15 goals
14 goals
13 goals

Managerial changes[edit]

Team Outgoing manager Manner of departure Date of vacancy Replaced by Date of appointment
Siena Italy Mario Beretta[2] Contract expired 27 May 2008 Italy Marco Giampaolo[2] 27 May 2008
Cagliari Italy Davide Ballardini[3] Contract expired 27 May 2008 Italy Massimiliano Allegri[4] 29 May 2008
Internazionale Italy Roberto Mancini[5] Sacked 29 May 2008 Portugal José Mourinho[6] 2 June 2008
Lecce Italy Giuseppe Papadopulo[7] Contract expired 23 June 2008 Italy Mario Beretta[7] 23 June 2008
Palermo Italy Stefano Colantuono[8] Sacked 4 September 2008 Italy Davide Ballardini[8] 4 September 2008
Bologna Italy Daniele Arrigoni[9] Sacked 3 November 2008 Serbia Siniša Mihajlović[9] 3 November 2008
Chievo Verona Italy Giuseppe Iachini[10] Sacked 4 November 2008 Italy Domenico Di Carlo[10] 4 November 2008
Torino Italy Gianni De Biasi[11] Sacked 8 December 2008 Italy Walter Novellino[11] 8 December 2008
Reggina Italy Nevio Orlandi[12] Sacked 16 December 2008 Italy Giuseppe Pillon[13] 16 December 2008
Reggina Italy Giuseppe Pillon[14] Sacked 25 January 2009 Italy Nevio Orlandi[14] 25 January 2009
Lecce Italy Mario Beretta[15] Sacked 9 March 2009 Italy Luigi De Canio[16] 9 March 2009
Napoli Italy Edoardo Reja[17] Sacked 10 March 2009 Italy Roberto Donadoni[17] 10 March 2009
Torino Italy Walter Novellino[18] Sacked 24 March 2009 Italy Giancarlo Camolese[18] 24 March 2009
Bologna Serbia Siniša Mihajlović[19] Sacked 14 April 2009 Italy Giuseppe Papadopulo[19] 14 April 2009
Juventus Italy Claudio Ranieri[20] Sacked 18 May 2009 Italy Ciro Ferrara[1][21] 18 May 2009
  • ^1 Juventus youth sector chief Ciro Ferrara was originally appointed on a temporary basis for the two final weeks of the season. The appointment was made permanent on 5 June 2009.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Comunicato n° 003/A del 3 luglio 2008/" (in Italian). FIGC. 3 July 2008. Retrieved 1 February 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "Marco Giampaolo nuovo allenatore del Siena" (in Italian). AC Siena. 27 May 2008. Retrieved 27 May 2008. [dead link]
  3. ^ "Ballardini va via" (in Italian). Cagliari Calcio. 27 May 2008. Retrieved 27 May 2008. 
  4. ^ "Allegri sulla panchina del Cagliari" (in Italian). Cagliari Calcio. 29 May 2008. Retrieved 29 May 2008. 
  5. ^ "Comunicato ufficiale F.C. Internazionale" (in Italian). FC Internazionale Milano. 29 May 2008. Retrieved 29 May 2008. 
  6. ^ "Nuovo allenatore: Josè Mourinho all'Inter" (in Italian). FC Internazionale Milano. 2 June 2008. Retrieved 2 June 2008. 
  7. ^ a b "Beretta nuovo allenatore del Lecce" (in Italian). US Lecce. 23 June 2008. Archived from the original on 26 June 2008. Retrieved 23 June 2008. 
  8. ^ a b "Esonerato colantuono. squadra affidata a ballardini" (in Italian). U.S. Città di Palermo. 4 September 2008. Retrieved 4 September 2008. 
  9. ^ a b "Il Bologna a Mihajlovic" (in Italian). Bologna FC 1909. 3 November 2008. Retrieved 3 November 2008. [dead link]
  10. ^ a b "La Squadra Affidata A Domenico Di Carlo. Oggi Alee 14 La Presentazione" (in Italian). AC ChievoVerona. 4 November 2008. Retrieved 4 November 2008. [dead link]
  11. ^ a b "De Biasi esonerato dal suo incarico" (in Italian). Torino FC. 8 December 2008. Retrieved 13 December 2008. 
  12. ^ "Prima squadra" (in Italian). Reggina Calcio. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  13. ^ "Mister Pillon in conferenza stampa" (in Italian). Reggina Calcio. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  14. ^ a b "Comunicato ufficiale" (in Italian). Reggina Calcio. 25 January 2009. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  15. ^ "Sollevato dall'incarico mister Beretta" (in Italian). US Lecce. 9 March 2009. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  16. ^ "Luigi De Canio è il nuovo allenatore" (in Italian). US Lecce. 9 March 2009. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  17. ^ a b "Roberto Donadoni nuovo tecnico azzurro" (in Italian). SSC Napoli. 10 March 2009. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  18. ^ a b "CAMOLESE È IL NUOVO ALLENATORE DEL TORO" (in Italian). Torino FC. 24 March 2009. Retrieved 24 March 2009. 
  19. ^ a b "Papadopulo è il nuovo allenatore del Bologna" (in Italian). Bologna FC 1909. 14 April 2009. Retrieved 19 April 2009. [dead link]
  20. ^ "Ranieri sacked by Juventus". ESPN Soccernet. 18 May 2009. Retrieved 18 May 2009. 
  21. ^ "Ciro Ferrara is the new Juventus coach". Juventus FC. 18 May 2009. Retrieved 18 May 2009. 
  22. ^ "Ciro Ferrara is the new Juventus coach". Juventus FC. 5 June 2009. Retrieved 5 June 2009.