2008–09 Atlantic Coast Conference men's basketball season

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2008–09 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Season
League NCAA Division I
Sport Basketball
Duration December 17, 2008
through March 8, 2009
Number of teams 12
TV partner(s) Raycom, ESPN
Regular Season
First place North Carolina (13–3)
Runners-Up Wake Forest (11–5)
Duke (11–5)
Season MVP Ty Lawson – UNC
Top scorer Tyler Hansbrough – UNC
Tournament
Tournament champions Duke (17th)
Tournament MVP Jon Scheyer
Basketball seasons
2008–09 ACC men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#2 North Carolina 13 3   .813     34 4   .895
#6 Duke 11 5   .688     30 7   .811
#12 Wake Forest 11 5   .688     24 7   .774
#16 Florida State 10 6   .625     25 10   .714
#24 Clemson 9 7   .563     23 9   .719
Boston College 9 7   .563     22 12   .647
Maryland 7 9   .438     21 14   .600
Virginia Tech 7 9   .438     19 15   .559
Miami (FL) 7 9   .438     19 13   .594
North Carolina State 6 10   .375     16 14   .533
Virginia 4 12   .250     10 18   .357
Georgia Tech 2 14   .125     12 19   .387
† ACC Tournament winner
Rankings from AP Poll

The 2008–09 Atlantic Coast Conference men's basketball season was the 56th season for the league. North Carolina won the regular season crown while Duke won the ACC Tournament championship. The season saw Tyler Hansbrough set conference records in points (finishing with 2,872 for his career) and free throws made (982), while Miami's Jack McClinton ended his career as the conference's all time three-point marksman (.440 3-point FG%).

Pre-season[edit]

On October 26, for the second-straight year North Carolina was the unanimous choice to finish first atop the Atlantic Coast Conference basketball race in voting by 40 media members at the league’s annual Basketball Media Day. Duke was picked for second, while Wake Forest was voted third. Miami was fourth, followed by Clemson (fifth) and Virginia Tech (sixth).

Tyler Hansbrough was selected as pre-season ACC Player of the Year. Hansbrough averaged 22.6 points and 10.2 rebounds during the 2008–09 while earning first-team All-America honors for a third-straight year and consensus National Player of the Year honors. Wake Forest's Al-Farouq Aminu was the media’s choice for the ACC pre-season Rookie of the Year.

Hansbrough and Boston College’s Tyrese Rice were unanimous selections for the pre-season All-ACC team. Also named to the pre-season team were Miami’s Jack McClinton, North Carolina’s Ty Lawson and Gerald Henderson from Duke.

On November 13, the Los Angeles Athletic Club released their annual pre-season John R. Wooden Award watch list.[1] The list is composed of 50 student athletes who, based on 2007-08's individual performance and team records, are the early frontrunners for college basketball's most coveted trophy. These top 50 candidates are returning players. Transfers, freshmen, and medical red-shirts are not eligible for this preseason list, but will be evaluated and considered for both the Midseason Top 30 list and the National Ballot. The ACC was represented by Boston College's Tyrese Rice, Duke's Gerald Henderson and Kyle Singler, Miami’s Jack McClinton, North Carolina's Tyler Hansbrough, Wayne Ellington and Ty Lawson and Wake Forest’s James Johnson. In the 2007–08 season, North Carolina’s Hansbrough became the 12th ACC Player to earn Wooden National Player of the Year Award.[2]

Regular season[edit]

November
In November, nine ACC teams participated in eight regular season tournaments across the United States. Four ACC teams claimed championships.

Name Dates Num. teams Championship
2k Sports Classic Nov. 10–21
16
Duke 71 vs. Michigan 57
Charleston Classic Nov. 14–16
8
Clemson 76 vs. Temple 72
Maui Invitational Nov. 24–26
8
UNC 102 vs. Notre Dame 87
76 Classic Nov. 27–30
8
Wake Forest 87 vs. Baylor 74

On November 11, Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski moved into fifth place on the NCAA’s all-time win list with his 805th career victory, a 97–54 win over Georgia Southern. On November 16, Virginia’s Sylven Landesberg has 28 points, eight rebounds and eight assists as the Cavaliers beat VMI 107- 97. Landesberg’s 28 points tied the second-highest total by an ACC freshman in his college debut. On November 21, With Maryland’s 89–74 overtime win over Vermont, Gary Williams became only the third coach in league history to reach 400 career victories while coaching in the ACC. On November 21, Virginia’s Sylven Landesberg netted a game-high 22 points in the Cavaliers’ 68–66 win over Radford and became only the second freshman in ACC history to score 20 points in each of his first three games. Georgia Tech’s Kenny Anderson scored 20 or more points in each of his first six games as a freshman in 1989–90. On November 30, Ty Lawson had 22 points as No. 1 North Carolina beat UNC-Asheville 116–48. The 68-point win margin was the largest in the ACC since a 75-point Maryland win over North Texas State (132–57) on Dec. 23, 1998, and tied for the seventh largest margin ever in ACC history.


December
On Wednesday, December 3, The ACC won its 10th-straight ACC–Big Ten Challenge by winning six of the eleven matchups. The series was highlighted by the 98–63 victory of No. 1 North Carolina over No. 12 Michigan State at Ford Field in what was dubbed as "Basketbowl II". On December 23, Boston College’s Corey Raji was a perfect 12-for-12 from the field and scored a career-high 26 points in a 99–61 win over Maine. Raji’s performance tied him for the second-best single game performance in ACC history. UNC’s Brad Daugherty holds the ACC single-game field proficiency mark making all 13 of his shots versus UCLA back on Nov. 24, 1985. On December 30, NC State sophomore Tracy Smith came off the bench to score a career-high 31 points in the Wolfpack’s 88–68 win over visiting Towson. Smith’s 31 points set a school record and tied for the third-highest point total by a non-starter in ACC history.


January
On January 3, Jeff Teague had a game-high 30 points and James Johnson adds 22 points and 15 rebounds as sixth ranked Wake Forest snapped the nation’s longest home court winning streak at 53 with a 94–87 win at BYU before a crowd of 26,096. On January 19, 16–0 Wake Forest took over the No. 1 spot in the AP poll and became the second ACC team to be ranked No. 1 in both the writers and coaches’ polls. With the Deacons assuming the top spot in his 46th game as a head coach, Dino Gaudio became the third-fastest ACC head coach to have his team voted #1. On January 26, 18–1 Duke became the third ACC team this season to be ranked No. 1 in the AP poll, marking the second time in ACC annals and the fourth time in AP poll history that three different teams from the same conference have been ranked No. 1 in the same season. On January 31, In only the second-ever meeting between brothers in an ACC game, the Aminu brothers (Alade and Al-Farouq) combine for 27 points and 24 rebounds as Georgia Tech upsets No. 4 Wake Forest 76–74 in Atlanta. Al-Farouq had 17 points, 11 rebounds and five steals for the Deacons while Alade had 10 points, 13 rebounds for the Jackets.


February
On February 5, midway through the 2009 college basketball season, the Los Angeles Athletic Club's John R. Wooden Award Committee selected the top 30 candidates for the John R. Wooden Award, the nation's most coveted college basketball honor. The list is composed of the players who will compete for this season's player of the year award, the midseason list is based on individual player performance and team records during the first half of the season. The ACC was represent by North Carolina's Tyler Hansbrough, Ty Lawson, Duke's Gerald Henderson, Kyle Singler and Wake Forest's Jeff Teague. Teague was one of nine players who were selected for the midseason list who were not selected in the preseason.[3]

On February 15, Ty Lawson had 21 points and four assists and Wayne Ellington added 15 points and 10 rebounds in North Carolina’s 69–65 win at Miami. With the win, UNC’s Roy Williams’ became the winningest coach through his first 200 games at an ACC school. On February 21, Greivis Vasquez posted Maryland’s first triple-double since 1987 as the Terps overcame a 16-point second-half deficit to beat No. 3 North Carolina 88–85 in overtime, ending the Tar Heels’ 10-game win streak. In posting Maryland’s third ever triple double, Vasquez had a career-high 35 points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists. Vasquez’s 35 points set a record for the most ever by an ACC player recording a triple-double.

On February 22, In North Carolina’s 104–74 win over Georgia Tech, the Tar Heels’ Tyler Hansbrough made all eight of his free throws and became the NCAA career leader in free throws made with 907. Hansbrough broke Wake Forest's Dickie Hemric's record set in 1955 with his 906th free throw with 14:54 to play in the second half.


March
On March 7, Miami’s Jack McClinton was a perfect 16-for-16 from the free throw line and scored a game-high 24 points as the Hurricanes overcame a nine-point halftime deficit en route to a 72–64 win over visiting NC State. McClinton’s 16-for-16 effort tied for the fourth-best single-game mark in league history.

Rankings[edit]

AP Poll[4] Pre 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Final
Boston College 17 RV RV RV
Clemson RV RV RV RV RV 25 22 20 12 10 10 12 10 12 13 12 18 17 24
Duke 8 10 7 4 7 6 5 5 2 3 2 1 4 6 9 7 7 9 6
Florida State RV RV RV RV RV RV RV RV RV 25 RV 23 24 22 16
Georgia Tech RV
Maryland RV RV RV RV RV RV
Miami 17 17 22 21 RV RV RV RV RV RV RV RV RV
North Carolina 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 5 5 5 3 3 3 4 2 1 2
NC State
Virginia
Virginia Tech RV RV RV
Wake Forest 24 20 19 15 11 10 6 6 4 2 1 6 7 7 8 13 10 8 12

Statistics[edit]

Individual[edit]


Teams[edit]

Team G
PF
PA
PFPG
PAPG
Margin
FG
FGA
FG%
3FG
3FGA
3FG%
FT
FTA
FT%
RebF
RebA
Margin
Boston College 34 2528 2397 74.4 70.5 +3.9 885 2000 .443 217 649 .334 541 733 .738 1259 1167 +2.7
Clemson 32 2507 2177 78.3 68.0 +10.3 912 1971 .463 256 684 .374 427 621 .688 1189 1127 +1.9
Duke 36 2813 2362 78.1 65.6 +12.5 955 2126 .449 262 739 .355 641 880 .728 1314 1198 +3.2
Florida State 35 2392 2271 68.3 64.9 +3.5 820 1886 .435 216 631 .342 536 739 .725 1253 1221 +0.9
Georgia Tech 31 2208 2216 71.2 71.5 −0.3 815 1868 .436 159 492 .323 419 665 .630 1211 1143 +2.2
Maryland 35 2512 2419 71.8 69.1 +2.7 924 2179 .424 201 604 .333 463 611 .758 1274 1333 −1.7
Miami 32 2325 2123 72.7 66.3 +6.3 796 1865 .427 251 682 .368 482 706 .683 1272 1107 +5.2
NC State 30 2189 2087 73.0 69.6 +3.4 773 1626 .475 202 538 .375 441 615 .717 1075 973 +3.4
North Carolina 38 3413 2735 89.8 72.0 +17.8 1205 2509 .480 264 682 .387 739 983 .752 1594 1353 +6.3
Virginia 28 1960 2029 70.0 72.5 −2.5 701 1682 .417 156 494 .316 402 543 .740 1030 990 +1.4
Virginia Tech 34 2470 2405 72.6 70.7 +1.9 845 1934 .437 207 615 .337 573 791 .724 1257 1153 +3.1
Wake Forest 31 2510 2193 81.0 70.7 +10.2 906 1849 .490 126 394 .320 572 804 .711 1262 1080 +5.9

Postseason[edit]

ACC Tournament[edit]

Semifinals Championship
           
  1   North Carolina (13–3) 70
4 Florida State (10–6) 73
  4   Florida State 69
3 Duke 79
7 Maryland (7–9) 61
3 Duke (11–5) 67

The third-seeded Duke Blue Devils defeated fourth-seeded Florida State 79–69 in the title ACC Championship game on Sunday, March 15, giving Duke its ninth ACC crown in 12 years. Duke also tied North Carolina for most tournament championships with 17. Duke's Jon Scheyer was named the tournament MVP.

NCAA Tournament[edit]


Team Seed Round Date Time Opponent# Site Result Attendance
North Carolina (6–0)
#1
First Thur, Mar. 19 2:50 pm vs. No. 16 Radford Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC W 101–58
20,226
Second Sat, Mar. 21 5:45 pm vs. No. 8 LSU Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC W 84–70
22,479
Sweet 16 Fri, Mar. 27 9:57 pm vs. No. 4 Gonzaga FedExForumMemphis, TN W 98–77
17,103
Elite Eight Sun, Mar. 29 5:05 pm vs. No. 2 Oklahoma FedExForumMemphis, TN W 72–60
17,025
Final Four Sat, Apr. 4 8:47 pm vs. No. 3 Villanova Ford FieldDetroit, MI W 83–69
72,456
Finals Mon, Apr. 6 9:21 pm vs. No. 3 Michigan State Ford FieldDetroit, MI W 89–72
72,922
Duke (2–1)
#2
First Thur, Mar. 19 9:40 pm vs. No. 15 Binghamton Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC W 86–62
20,001
Second Sat, Mar. 21 8:15 pm vs. No. 7 Texas Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC W 74–69
22,479
Sweet 16 Thur, Mar. 26 9:57 pm vs No. 3 Villanova TD Banknorth GardenBoston L 54–77
18,831
Wake Forest (0–1)
#4
First Fri, Mar. 20 9:40 pm vs. No. 13 Cleveland State American Airlines ArenaMiami, FL L 69–84
8,990
Florida State (0–1)
#5
First Fri, Mar. 20 9:55 pm vs. No. 12 Wisconsin Taco Bell ArenaBoise, ID L 59–61OT
12,194
Boston College (0–1)
#7
First Fri, Mar. 20 7:20 pm vs. No. 10 USC Hubert H. Humphrey MetrodomeMinneapolis,MN L 55–72
12,814
Clemson (0–1)
#7
First Thur, Mar. 19 7:10 pm vs. No. 10 Michigan Sprint CenterKansas City, MO L 59–62
17,398
Maryland (1–1)
#10
First Thur, Mar. 19 2:55 pm vs. No. 7 California Sprint CenterKansas City, MO W 84–71
17,319
Second Sat, Mar. 21 3:20 pm vs. No. 2 Memphis Sprint CenterKansas City, MO L 70–89
18,247
# indicates seedings. All times are Eastern

Ty Lawson was the South regional MVP and he was joined on the All-regional team by teammates Danny Green and Tyler Hansbrough.[5]

The first-seeded North Carolina Tarheels defeated third-seeded Michigan State 89–72 in the title NCAA Championship game on Monday, April 6, giving North Carolina its second NCAA crown in four years. It was North Carolina's fifth national championship. North Carolina's Wayne Ellington was named the Final Four's Most Outstanding Player.

National Invitation Tournament[edit]

Team Seed Round Date Time Opponent# Site TV Result Attendance
Virginia Tech (1–1)
#2
First Wed, Mar. 18 7:00 pm #7 Duquesne Cassell ColiseumBlacksburg, VA ESPNU W 116–1082OT
5,878
Second Sat, Mar. 21 11:00 am #3 Baylor Cassell Coliseum • Blacksburg, VA ESPN L 66–84
6,891
Miami (1–1)
#4
First Wed, Mar. 18 7:00 pm @ No. 5 Providence Dunkin' Donuts CenterProvidence, RI ESPN2 W 78–66
5,645
Second Fri, Mar. 20 7:00 pm @ No. 1 Florida Stephen C. O'Connell CenterGainesville, FL ESPNU L 60–74
6,525
# Rankings indicate seedings. All times are Eastern

Conference awards & honors[edit]

Weekly awards[edit]

ACC Players of the Week
Throughout the conference season, the ACC offices name a player and rookie of the week. The MVP of the ACC Tournament is the automatic winner of the final ACC player of the week of each season.

Week Player of the week Rookie of the week
November 17 Kyle Singler, Duke Sylven Landesberg, UVA
Trevor Booker, Clem.
November 24 Greivis Vasquez, MD Sylven Landesberg, UVA
December 1 Ty Lawson, UNC Al-Farouq Aminu, WF
December 8 Greivis Vasquez, MD Iman Shumpert, GT
December 15 Tyler Hansbrough, UNC Chris Singleton, FSU
December 22 K. C. Rivers, Clem. Sylven Landesberg, UVA
December 29 Toney Douglas, FSU Sylven Landesberg, UVA
January 5 Tyrese Rice, BC Al-Farouq Aminu, WF
January 12 Jeff Teague, WF Sylven Landesberg, UVA
January 19 Jeff Teague, WF Al-Farouq Aminu, WF
January 26 Malcolm Delaney, VT Reggie Jackson, BC
February 2 K. C. Rivers, Clem. Al-Farouq Aminu, WF
Gani Lawal, GT
February 9 Jack McClinton, Mia. Solomon Alabi, FSU
February 16 Ty Lawson, UNC Sylven Landesberg, UVA
February 23 Greivis Vasquez, MD Elliot Williams, Duke
March 2 Gerald Henderson, Duke Solomon Alabi, FSU
March 9 Toney Douglas, FSU Al-Farouq Aminu, WF
March 16 Jon Scheyer, Duke None Selected

Season awards[edit]

Player of the Year

Rookie of the Year

Coach of the Year

Defensive Player of the Year

All-Atlantic Coast Conference

Honorable Mention: Wayne Ellington – North Carolina, K.C. Rivers – Clemson, Sylven Landesberg – Virginia

All-ACC Freshman team

1 – Denotes unanimous selection
Honorable Mention: Chris Singleton – Florida State

All-ACC Defensive team

Honorable Mention: Ty Lawson – North Carolina, Gani Lawal – Georgia Tech, Courtney Fells – NC State, Gerald Henderson – Duke

All-ACC Academic team
To be eligible for consideration, a student-athlete must have earned a 3.00 grade point average for the previous semester and maintained a 3.00 cumulative average during his academic career. Four players – McClinton, Paulus, Duke's Brian Zoubek and Virginia's Jerome Meyinsse – are repeaters from previous league all-academic teams. McClinton and Paulus were named to the team for the third time in their careers, while Zoubek and Meyinsse are two-time selections.[6]

Name School Year Hometown Major
Jack McClinton Miami SR Baltimore, MD Sport Administration
Jerome Meyinsse UVa JR Baton Rouge, LA Economics
Greg Paulus Duke SR Syracuse, NY Political Science
Tanner Smith Clemson FR Alpharetta, GA Pre-Business
Tunji Soroye UVa SR Dugbe Ibadan, Nigeria Education
Johnny Thomas NC State Redshirt.svgFR Morehead City, NC Sport Management
Tyler Zeller North Carolina FR Washington, IN Business Administration
Brian Zoubek Duke JR Haddonfield, NJ History

National awards & honors[edit]

NABC[edit]

On March 5, the National Association of Basketball Coaches announced their Division I All‐District teams, recognizing the nation’s best men’s collegiate basketball student-athletes. Selected and voted on by member coaches of the NABC, 240 student-athletes, from 24 districts were chosen. The selection on this list are then eligible for the State Farm Coaches’ Division I All-America teams to be announced at the 2009 NABC Convention in Detroit. The following list represents the ACC players chosen to the list. All ACC schools are within District 2.[7]

USBWA[edit]

On March 10, the U.S. Basketball Writers Association released its 2008–09 Men's All-District Teams, based on voting from its national membership. There are nine regions from coast to coast and a player and coach of the year are selected in each. The following is each ACC player selected within their respective regions.[8]

CoSIDA[edit]

On February 5, 2009, the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) and ESPN The Magazine selected their Academic All-Americans from throughout college basketball. To be nominated, a student-athlete must be a starter or important reserve with at least a 3.30 cumulative grade point average (on a 4.0 scale) at his/her current institution. Nominated athletes must have participated in at least 50 percent of the team’s games at the position listed on the nomination form (where applicable). No student-athlete is eligible until he has completed one full calendar year at his current institution and has reached sophomore athletic eligibility. In the cases of transfers, graduate students and two-year college graduates, the student-athlete must have completed one full calendar year at the nominating institution to be eligible. Nominees in graduate school must have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or better both as an undergrad and in grad school. The ACC had two players selected from District III as first-team Academic All-District selections: Greg Paulus and Brian Zoubek, both from Duke.[9] Greg Paulus was also selected overall by the CoSIDA as a third-team Academic All-American.[10]

All-American[edit]

Consensus All-Americans
First Team Second Team
Tyler Hansbrough – North Carolina Ty Lawson – North Carolina
Jeff Teague – Wake Forest

To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The Sporting News and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

Associated Press[11][12] NABC Sporting News[13] USBWA[14]
First Team
Tyler Hansbrough – North Carolina Tyler Hansbrough – North Carolina Tyler Hansbrough – North Carolina Tyler Hansbrough – North Carolina
Second Team
Ty Lawson – North Carolina Ty Lawson – North Carolina
Jeff Teague – Wake Forest
Ty Lawson – North Carolina
Jeff Teague – Wake Forest
Jeff Teague – Wake Forest
Third Team
Toney Douglas – Florida State
Gerald Henderson – Duke
Gerald Henderson – Duke Toney Douglas – Florida State
Honorable Mention
Tyrese Rice – Boston College
Kyle Singler – Duke
Jeff Teague – Wake Forest

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2008–2009 John R. Wooden Award Preseason Top 50 List". Wooden Award. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2009-03-07. 
  2. ^ "Eight ACC Players on Wooden Award Preseason List". Men's Basketball. TheACC.com. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2009-03-07. 
  3. ^ "John R. Wooden Award 2008–09 Midseason Top 30 Candidates Announced". Wooden Award. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2009-03-07. 
  4. ^ "2009 NCAA Men's Basketball Rankings". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. 2009-02-02. Archived from the original on 7 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-03. 
  5. ^ Murtaugh, Frank (2009-03-29). "NCAA South Regional: North Carolina 72, Oklahoma 60". Memphis Flyer. Retrieved 2009-03-31. 
  6. ^ "Miami's Jack McClinton and Duke's Greg Paulus Headline the 2009 All-Atlantic Coast Conference Academic Men's Basketball Team". Men's Basketball. TheACC.com. Retrieved 2009-03-06. 
  7. ^ steven. "National Association of Basketball Coaches Announces 2009 Division I All-District Teams". National Association of Basketball Coaches. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2009-03-05. 
  8. ^ "USBWA NAMES 2008–09 MEN'S ALL-DISTRICT TEAMS". U.S. Basketball Writers Association. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2009-03-10. 
  9. ^ lanke (2009-02-05). "2009 Academic All-District Men’s Basketball Teams". ESPN The Magazine. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2009-03-27. 
  10. ^ O’Connell, Dan and Geoff Hassard (2009-02-25). "Brett Winkelman of North Dakota State, MIT's Jimmy Bartolotta Lead ESPN The Magazine's Academic All America Men's Basketball Teams". ESPN The Magazine. Retrieved 2009-03-27. 
  11. ^ Associated Press (2009-03-30). "Griffin, Hansbrough lead AP first team". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on 31 March 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-30. 
  12. ^ "2009 AP All-America teams". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2009-04-01. 
  13. ^ Sporting News 2008–09 College Basketball All-Americans
  14. ^ 2009 USBWA All-Americans