2008 Summer Paralympics medal table

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Six medals are shown to display the front and back of each. From left to right, silver, gold and bronze.
The front and reverse of each medal from the 2008 Summer Paralympics

The medal table of the 2008 Summer Paralympics ranks the participating National Paralympic Committees (NPCs) by the number of gold medals won by their athletes during the competition. The 2008 Paralympics was the thirteenth Games to be held, a quadrennial competition open to athletes with physical and intellectual disabilities. The games were held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, from 6 September to 17 September 2008.[1]

Some 3,951 athletes from 146 NPCs participated in 472 events in 20 sports, with Burundi, Gabon, Georgia, Haiti and Montenegro making their Paralympic debuts. This set new records for both the number of NPCs competing and the number of athletes overall.[1] The design of the medals was similar to those awarded in the 2008 Summer Olympics,[2] featuring jade discs inserted into the medals themselves, with different color discs included for the three types of medals. A total of 21 designs were submitted from designers from the China Central Academy of Fine Arts, Tsinghua University and the China Banknote Printing and Minting Corporation, with the final design approved in the autumn of 2007.[3]

Athletes from a record 76 NPCs won medals, leaving 70 NPCs without a medal.[4] Athletes from Croatia,[5] Mongolia,[6] Saudi Arabia,[7] Singapore[8] and Venezuela won their first ever gold medals.[9] Host China topped the medal table with 211 medals in total, including 89 gold medals, while Great Britain placed second with 102 medals, including 42 golds.[1][10] Canadian wheelchair racer Chantal Petitclerc, S9 swimmers Natalie du Toit and Matthew Cowdrey, from South Africa and Australia respectively, each won five gold medals at the 2008 Games.[4] Brazilian S5 swimmer Daniel Dias won the most individual medals overall,[11] a total of nine medals, comprising four golds, four silvers and a bronze.[1]

Medal table[edit]

Two men wearing yellow outfits standing next to a woman with medals around her neck.
Daniel Dias (center left), who won nine medals overall at the 2008 Games, with President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff
A woman with dark hair wearing a black outfit against a black background, she holds a microphone.
Canadian wheelchair racer Chantal Petitclerc won five gold medals at the 2008 Games.
A disabled Caucasian sprinter running on running blades, he wears the green and yellow of South Africa.
Sprinter Oscar Pistorius won three gold medals for South Africa at the 2008 Paralympics.[12]
A man wearing sunglasses and a white and blue tracksuit with medals around his neck.
British para-dressage rider Lee Pearson wearing his medals from the 2008 Paralympics

The ranking in this table is based on information provided by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and is consistent with IPC convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won (in this context, a "nation" is an entity represented by a National Paralympic Committee). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals. If nations are still tied, equal ranking is given and they are listed alphabetically by IPC country code.

In the judo competition, an additional thirteen bronze medals were awards as the losing competitors in both of the semi finals were each awarded a medal rather than having a playoff bout to decide the medallist.[13] The swimming also saw multiple instances of the same medals being awarded, in the women's 100m backstroke S10, both Sophie Pascoe and Shireen Sapiro swam a dead heat in the final and were both awarded a gold medal, resulting in no silver medal being given that for event. In both the women's 400, freestyle S13 and the men's 100m butterfly S11, two bronze medals were awarded each as two swimmers set the same time in third place.[13]

Key

   *   Host NPC

List of medal-winning NPCs, showing the number of gold, silver, and bronze medals won
Rank NPC Gold Silver Bronze Total
1*  China (CHN) 89 70 52 211
2  Great Britain (GBR) 42 29 31 102
3  United States (USA) 36 35 28 99
4  Ukraine (UKR) 24 18 32 74
5  Australia (AUS) 23 29 27 79
6  South Africa (RSA) 21 3 6 30
7  Canada (CAN) 19 10 21 50
8  Russia (RUS) 18 23 22 63
9  Brazil (BRA) 16 14 17 47
10  Spain (ESP) 15 21 22 58
11  Germany (GER) 14 25 20 59
12  France (FRA) 12 21 19 52
13  South Korea (KOR) 10 8 13 31
14  Mexico (MEX) 10 3 7 20
15  Tunisia (TUN) 9 9 3 21
16  Czech Republic (CZE) 6 3 18 27
17  Japan (JPN) 5 14 8 27
18  Poland (POL) 5 12 13 30
19  Netherlands (NED) 5 10 7 22
20  Greece (GRE) 5 9 10 24
21  Belarus (BLR) 5 7 1 13
22  Iran (IRI) 5 6 3 14
23  Cuba (CUB) 5 3 6 14
24  New Zealand (NZL) 5 3 4 12
24  Sweden (SWE) 5 3 4 12
26  Hong Kong (HKG) 5 3 3 11
27  Kenya (KEN) 5 3 1 9
28  Italy (ITA) 4 7 7 18
29  Egypt (EGY) 4 4 4 12
30  Nigeria (NGR) 4 4 1 9
31  Algeria (ALG) 4 3 8 15
32  Morocco (MAR) 4 1 2 7
33  Austria (AUT) 4 1 1 6
34  Switzerland (SUI) 3 2 6 11
35  Denmark (DEN) 3 2 4 9
36  Ireland (IRL) 3 1 1 5
37  Croatia (CRO) 3 1 0 4
38  Azerbaijan (AZE) 2 3 5 10
39  Slovakia (SVK) 2 3 1 6
40  Finland (FIN) 2 2 2 6
41  Thailand (THA) 1 5 7 13
42  Portugal (POR) 1 4 2 7
43  Norway (NOR) 1 3 3 7
44  Cyprus (CYP) 1 2 1 4
45  Latvia (LAT) 1 2 0 3
46  Singapore (SIN) 1 1 2 4
46  Venezuela (VEN) 1 1 2 4
48  Saudi Arabia (KSA) 1 1 0 2
49  Hungary (HUN) 1 0 5 6
50  Chinese Taipei (TPE) 1 0 1 2
50  Turkey (TUR) 1 0 1 2
52  Mongolia (MGL) 1 0 0 1
53  Israel (ISR) 0 5 1 6
54  Angola (ANG) 0 3 0 3
55  Jordan (JOR) 0 2 2 4
56  Lithuania (LTU) 0 2 0 2
56  Serbia (SRB) 0 2 0 2
58  Argentina (ARG) 0 1 5 6
59  Slovenia (SLO) 0 1 2 3
60  Bulgaria (BUL) 0 1 1 2
60  Colombia (COL) 0 1 1 2
60  Iraq (IRQ) 0 1 1 2
63  Bosnia and Herzegovina (BIH) 0 1 0 1
63  Pakistan (PAK) 0 1 0 1
63  Papua New Guinea (PNG) 0 1 0 1
63  Romania (ROU) 0 1 0 1
63  United Arab Emirates (UAE) 0 1 0 1
68  Lebanon (LIB) 0 0 2 2
69  Belgium (BEL) 0 0 1 1
69  Estonia (EST) 0 0 1 1
69  Jamaica (JAM) 0 0 1 1
69  Laos (LAO) 0 0 1 1
69  Malaysia (MAS) 0 0 1 1
69  Namibia (NAM) 0 0 1 1
69  Puerto Rico (PUR) 0 0 1 1
69  Syria (SYR) 0 0 1 1
Total 473 471 487 1431

Changes in medal standings[edit]

List of changes in medal standings
Ruling date Sport Event NPC Gold Silver Bronze Total
14 September 2008 Athletics Women's discus throw F37-38  Great Britain (GBR) -1 -1
 Australia (AUS) +1 -1
 China (CHN) +1 +1

On 14 September 2008, Rebecca Chin was stripped of the silver medal she had won in the F37-38 discus competition. The IPC overruled a change in her classification made earlier in the month, making her ineligible to have won the medal as she was reclassified as a F44 competitor.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Beijing 2008". Paralympic.org. Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
  2. ^ "Design Concept for the Medals of the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games". Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 
  3. ^ "Medals unveiled for Paralympic Games of 2008". Beijing 2008. 14 November 2007. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Day 12: China biggest winner at Paralympics". Xinhua/People's Daily. 17 September 2008. Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
  5. ^ Horvat, Karmen (6 February 2009). "Best Croatian Paralympic Athletes Of 2008". Dalje.com. Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
  6. ^ "Dambadondog wins Mongolia's first ever Paralympic medal". Beijing 2008. 14 September 2008. Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
  7. ^ "Osamah wins Saudi Arabia's first gold". Beijing 2008. 8 September 2008. Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
  8. ^ "Yip's year: A sweet sixteen". Beijing 2008. 17 September 2008. Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
  9. ^ "Venezuela sports minister hails Beijing Paralympics as "perfect"". China Daily. 15 September 2008. Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
  10. ^ "2008 Medal Tally". ABC. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 
  11. ^ "Daniel Dias". Laureus. Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
  12. ^ "Paralympics 100m: Oscar Pistorius says past experience vital". BBC Sport (BBC). 21 May 2012. Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
  13. ^ a b "IPC Historical Results Database". Paralympic.org. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 
  14. ^ Davies, Gareth A (15 September 2008). "Rebecca Chin stripped of Paralympic silver by 'failing' system". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 

External links[edit]