2009 Big Ten Conference football season

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2009 Big Ten Conference football season
BigTen.png
League NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision)
Sport football
Duration September 3, 2009
through January 7, 2010
Number of teams 11
TV partner(s) ABC, ESPN, ESPN2, Big Ten Network
2010 NFL Draft
Top draft pick Brandon Graham
Picked by Philadelphia Eagles, 1st round (13th overall)
Regular Season
Champion Ohio State
Runners-up Iowa / Penn State
Season MVP Brandon Graham / Daryll Clark
Football seasons
← 2008
2010 →
2009 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
#5/5 Ohio State   7 1         11 2  
#7/7 Iowa   6 2         11 2  
#9/8 Penn State   0* 2         0* 2  
#16/16 Wisconsin   5 3         10 3  
Northwestern   5 3         8 5  
Michigan State   4 4         6 7  
Purdue   4 4         5 7  
Minnesota   3 5         6 7  
Illinois   2 6         3 9  
Michigan   1 7         5 7  
Indiana   1 7         4 8  
† – BCS representative as champion
‡ – BCS at-large representative
  • *All wins for Penn State (11-2, 6-2) vacated due to scandal.
    Rankings from AP Poll / Coaches' Poll

The 2009 Big Ten Conference football season was the 114th for the conference, and saw Ohio State conclude the regular season as Big Ten Conference champion for the 5th consecutive time, their 34th Big Ten title. This earned them the conference's automatic selection to a Bowl Championship Series game in which it emerged victorious in the January 1, 2010 Rose Bowl against Oregon Ducks. Co-runner-up, Iowa, earned the conference's at-large BCS invitation to the January 5, 2010 Orange Bowl. The season started on Thursday, September 3, as conference member Indiana hosted Eastern Kentucky. The conference’s other 10 teams began their respective 2009 season of NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) competition two days later.[1] All teams started their season at home except Illinois who started their season on neutral turf for the third consecutive season against Missouri and Minnesota who traveled to Syracuse.[2]

Although several players had post season All-star games remaining, the season concluded for Big Ten teams with the 2010 Orange Bowl in which Iowa defeated Georgia Tech. This was the seventh bowl game for the conference which compiled a 4–3 record. Over the course of 77 home games, the conference set a new attendance record. During the season, Minnesota opened a new athletic stadium, TCF Bank Stadium, and Purdue welcomed a new head coach, Danny Hope.

The season saw John Clay selected as offensive player of the year by both the coaches and the media. Jared Odrick and Greg Jones won defensive player of the year awards from the coaches and media, respectively. Chicago Tribune Silver Football recipients as the Big Ten co-MVPs were Daryll Clark and Brandon Graham. Jones was the conferences only consensus 2009 College Football All-America Team representative. The Big Ten Conference enjoyed two national statistical championships. Graham led the nation in tackles for a loss (TFL). Ray Fisher earned the national statistical championship in kickoff return average and established a new Big Ten single-season record with his performance. The Big Ten led the nation with six first team Academic All-Americans. After the season, 34 athletes were selected in the 2010 NFL Draft including three in the first round and six each by Iowa and Penn State.

Previous season[edit]

During the 2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season, Ohio State won its fourth consecutive Big Ten championship while co-champion Penn State won its second in four years.[3][4] Although the two teams tied with 7–1 conference records, Penn State earned the conference's automatic Bowl Championship Series selection due to a head-to-head victory.[4] The two teams have been the only teams from the conference to win a Big Ten championship in the past four seasons.

During the season, every home game was televised nationally and 98 percent of the Big Ten's games were nationally aired far exceeding all other conferences, none of whom had even 75 percent of their games televised.[2]

Preseason[edit]

In a given year, each Big Ten team will play eight of the other Big Ten teams. Thus for any given team in a given year, there are two others which will not be competed against. Below is the breakdown of each team and its two "no-plays" for 2009:[2]

  • Illinois: Iowa, Wisconsin
  • Indiana: Michigan State, Minnesota
  • Iowa: Illinois, Purdue
  • Michigan: Minnesota, Northwestern
  • Michigan State: Indiana, Ohio State
  • Minnesota: Indiana, Michigan
  • Northwestern: Michigan, Ohio State
  • Ohio State: Michigan State, Northwestern
  • Penn State: Purdue, Wisconsin
  • Purdue: Iowa, Penn State
  • Wisconsin: Illinois, Penn State

The Big Ten Conference announced on July 27 that the big ten media had elected Ohio State as the preseason favorite for the 2009 football season. It had ranked Penn State second and Michigan State third. It chose Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor the Preseason Offensive Player of the Year and Michigan State linebacker Greg Jones the Preseason Defensive Player of the Year.[1]

In the Preseason Coaches' Poll released on August 7, the Big Ten was one of only three conferences with multiple teams ranked in the top ten.[5]

The College Football Hall of Fame has selected Iowa's Larry Station (1982–85), Ohio State's Chris Spielman (1984–87) and Penn State's Curt Warner (1979–82) for December induction. 28 Big Ten athletes were selected in the 2009 National Football League Draft in late April, including four first-round picks. Two additional players were selected in the 2009 Major League Baseball Draft.[2]

Watchlists[edit]

According to the Big Ten Conference at the beginning of the season: "The Big Ten now features 51 student-athletes on preseason watch lists for 19 different national awards. Among the honored conference players, 27 appear on more than one list and five Big Ten standouts lead the way by appearing on five different lists. Every Big Ten team has at least one player appearing on a watch list. Iowa, Ohio State and Penn State top all Big Ten schools with seven different players appearing on watch lists, followed by six nominees from Illinois and Michigan and five selections for Michigan State and Wisconsin.

On the offensive side of the ball, returning first-team All-Big Ten quarterback Daryll Clark of Penn State appears on the watch lists for the Walter Camp Player of the Year, Manning, Maxwell, Davey O'Brien and Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Awards. Illinois signal caller Juice Williams, a second-team All-Big Ten choice last year, appears on four different lists for the Manning, Maxwell, Davey O'Brien and Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Awards. Illini wideout Arrelious Benn (Biletnikoff, Walter Camp Player of the Year, Maxwell) and Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor (Manning, Maxwell, Davey O'Brien) appear on three different watch lists. Players appearing on two lists include Iowa offensive tackle Bryan Bulaga, Michigan running back Brandon Minor and offensive lineman David Molk, Michigan State center Joel Nitchman, Minnesota wideout Eric Decker and quarterback Adam Weber, Northwestern center Ben Burkett, Ohio State center Mike Brewster, Penn State running back Evan Royster and offensive lineman Stefan Wisniewski and the Wisconsin trio of running back John Clay, tight end Garrett Graham and center John Moffitt.

On the defensive side of the ball, four standouts appear on five different watch lists. Big Ten Preseason Defensive Player of the Year and returning first-team All-Big Ten linebacker Greg Jones of Michigan State has been named to the watch lists for the Bednarik, Butkus and Rotary Lombardi Awards and the Lott and Nagurski Trophies. Fellow linebacker Sean Lee of Penn State, who missed last season due to injury after earning second-team All-Big Ten accolades in 2007, appears on the same five watch lists as Jones. Defensive ends Brandon Graham of Michigan and Corey Wootton of Northwestern were both tabbed for the Bednarik, Ted Hendricks, Rotary Lombardi, Lott and Nagurski watch lists. Wootton was a first-team All-Big Ten choice last year while Graham was named to the second team. Two more Nittany Lion standouts were named to four watch lists in linebacker Navorro Bowman (Bednarik, Butkus, Lombardi, Nagurski) and defensive tackle Jared Odrick (Bednarik, Lombardi, Nagurski, Outland). Other defensive standouts to appear on multiple lists include Illinois linebacker Martez Wilson, Indiana defensive end Jammie Kirlew, Iowa linebacker Pat Angerer and Ohio State safety Kurt Coleman."[6][7]

Award watch lists[edit]

Award School Player
Chuck Bednarik Award[8]
(Top Defensive Player)
IND Jammie Kirlew
IOWA Pat Angerer
MICH Brandon Graham
MSU Greg Jones
NU Corey Wootton
PSU Sean Lee
Jared Odrick
Navorro Bowman
Fred Biletnikoff Award[9]
(Best Wide Receiver)
ILL Arrelious Benn
MINN Eric Decker
Butkus Award[10]
(Best Linebacker)
ILL Martez Wilson
MICH Obi Ezeh
MSU Greg Jones
PSU Sean Lee
Navorro Bowman
IOWA Pat Angerer
A.J. Edds
Walter Camp Award[7]
(Top College Player)
ILL Arrelious Benn
PSU Daryll Clark
Evan Royster
Lou Groza Award[7]
(Outstanding Place Kicker)
MSU Brett Swenson
OSU Aaron Pettrey
PUR Carson Wiggs
WIS Philip Welch
Ray Guy Award[7]
(Outstanding Punter)
IOWA Ryan Donahue
MICH Zoltan Mesko
Ted Hendricks Award[7]
(Outstanding Defensive End)
ILL Doug Pilcher
IND Jammie Kirlew
Greg Middleton
MICH Brandon Graham
MSU Trevor Anderson
NU Corey Wootton
OSU Lawrence Wilson
Lombardi Award[7]
(Outstanding Lineman)
ILL Martez Wilson
IND Jammie Kirlew
IOWA Bryan Bulaga
MICH Brandon Graham
David Molk
Stephen Schilling
MSU Greg Jones
Joel Nitchman
NU Ben Burkett
Corey Wootton
OSU Mike Brewster
PSU Navorro Bowman
Sean Lee
Jared Odrick
Stefen Wisniewski
WIS Gabe Carimi
Garrett Graham
John Moffitt
Lott Trophy[2][11]
(Defensive IMPACT Player of the Year)
IOWA Pat Angerer
MICH Brandon Graham
MSU Greg Jones
NU Corey Wootton
OSU Kurt Coleman
PSU Sean Lee
John Mackey Award[12]
(Outstanding Tight End)
OSU Jake Ballard
MSU Charlie Gantt
WIS Garrett Graham
ILL Michael Hoomanawanui
IOWA Tony Moeaki
PSU Andrew Quarless
Manning Award[7]
(Outstanding Quarterback)
ILL Juice Williams
IOWA Ricky Stanzi
MINN Adam Weber
OSU Terrelle Pryor
PSU Daryll Clark
Maxwell Award[7]
(Top College Player)
ILL Arrelious Benn
Juice Williams
MICH Brandon Minor
MINN Eric Decker
OSU Terrelle Pryor
PSU Daryll Clark
Evan Royster
WIS John Clay
Bronko Nagurski Trophy[13]
(Top Defensive Player)
OSU Kurt Coleman
MICH Brandon Graham
MSU Greg Jones
NU Corey Wootton
PSU Sean Lee
Jared Odrick
Navorro Bowman
Davey O'Brien Award[14]
(Outstanding Quarterback)
PSU Daryll Clark
OSU Terrelle Pryor
MINN Adam Weber
ILL Juice Williams
Outland Trophy[15]
(Outstanding Interior Lineman)
ILL Jon Asamoah
IOWA Bryan Bulaga
PSU Jared Odrick
Stefen Wisniewski
Dave Rimington Trophy[2][11]
(Outstanding Center)
MICH David Molk
MSU Joel Nitchman
OSU Mike Brewster
NU Ben Burkett
WIS John Moffitt
Jim Thorpe Award[16]
(Outstanding Defensive Back)
OSU Kurt Coleman
IOWA Amari Spievey
Doak Walker Award[17]
(Outstanding Running Back)
OSU Dan Herron
MICH Brandon Minor
WIS John Clay
Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award[2][11]
(Top Senior Quarterback)
ILL Juice Williams
NU Mike Kafka
PSU Daryll Clark

Lott Trophy, Bronko Nagurski Trophy, and Jim Thorpe Award watchlist candidate Kurt Coleman of Ohio State, was suspended by the Big Ten Conference for one game. The suspension was for a violation of the new 2009 NCAA football playing rule that required mandatory conference video review of an act where a player initiates helmet-to-helmet contact and targets a defenseless opponent. The incident occurred during the September 26 game against Illinois.[18]

Midseason[edit]

Obi Ezeh, Jones and Lee were among the sixteen selected to the midseason Butkus watchlist and Clark was named as one of ten finalists for the Unitas award.[19] Eight Big Ten athletes were named as semifinalists for the Campbell Trophy: Illinois' Jon Asamoah, Indiana's Jammie Kirlew, Michigan's Zoltan Mesko, Minnesota's Eric Decker, Northwestern's Andrew Brewer, Ohio State's Jim Cordle, Penn State's Josh Hull and Wisconsin's Mickey Turner on October 1.[20] Four Big Ten Players midseason watch list for the John Mackey Award: Moeaki, Gantt, Quarless and Graham.[21] Three were quarterfinalists for the Lott Award: Angerer, Jones and Coleman.[22] The Big Ten had two O'Brien Award semifinalists: Stanzi and Clark.[23] Eric Decker was named one of 10 semifinalists for the Biletnikoff Award.[24] Jones has been selected as a semifinalists for the Bednarik Award along with Angerer, Bowman and Wisconsin defensive end O'Brien Schofield. Hawkeyes' Tyler Sash was chosen as a semifinalist for the Jim Thorpe Award. Swenson and Northwestern's Stefan Demos were named semifinalists for the Groza Award.[25] Mesko, Blair White, and Andrew Brewer were among the 12 finalists for the Wuerffel Trophy.[26] Mesko, and Donahue were among 10 semifinalists for the Guy Award.[27] Mesko was named one of three finalists for the Ray Guy Award.[28] Michigan's Graham was a finalist for the Henricks Award.[29]

Rankings[edit]

Unlike most sports, college football's governing body, the NCAA, does not bestow a National Championship title. That title is bestowed by one or more of four different polling agencies. There are two main weekly polls that begin in the preseason: the AP Poll and the Coaches Poll. Two additional polls are released midway through the season; the Harris Interactive Poll is released after the fourth week of the season and the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) Standings is released after the seventh week. The Harris Poll and Coaches Poll are factors in the BCS Standings.

Legend
    Improvement in ranking
  Drop in ranking
  Not ranked previous week
RV Received votes but were not ranked in Top 25 of poll
  Pre Wk
1
Wk
2
Wk
3
Wk
4
Wk
5
Wk
6
Wk
7
Wk
8
Wk
9
Wk
10
Wk
11
Wk
12
Wk
13
Wk
14
Final
Illinois AP RV
C RV
BCS Not released
Indiana AP
C
BCS Not released
Iowa AP 22 RV RV RV 13 12 11 7 7 8 15 15 13 9 10 7
C 21 RV RV RV 17 14 12 8 8 6 13 15 13 10 11 7
BCS Not released 6 4 4 10 13 11 9 10
Michigan AP RV 25 23 22 RV RV RV
C RV RV RV 22 20 RV RV RV
BCS Not released
Michigan State AP RV RV
C RV RV RV
BCS Not released
Minnesota AP RV
C RV RV RV RV RV
BCS Not released
Northwestern AP RV RV RV RV
C RV RV RV RV RV RV RV RV
BCS Not released
Ohio State AP 6 8 11 13 9 9 7 18 17 15 10 9 9 8 8 5
C 6 7 11 11 9 8 7 17 15 12 8 8 8 7 8 5
BCS Not released 19 17 16 11 10 10 8 8
Penn State AP 8 7 5 5 15 14 14 13 12 11 19 13 12 10 11 9
C 9 5 5 4 13 12 13 11 10 10 17 12 11 9 13 8
BCS Not released 13 12 11 18 14 13 11 13
Purdue AP
C
BCS Not released
Wisconsin AP RV RV RV RV RV 24 21 17 RV RV 24 16
C RV RV RV 25 RV RV RV 22 20 14 RV RV 22 16
BCS Not released 21 21 20 16 25

Spring games[edit]

April 11

  • Michigan

April 18

  • Indiana
  • Purdue
  • Wisconsin

April 25

  • Illinois
  • Michigan State
  • Minnesota
  • Northwestern
  • Ohio State
  • Penn State

Did not have spring game this year

  • Iowa

Season[edit]

Purdue head coach Danny Hope began his first season in West Lafayette. On September 12, Minnesota opened the 2009 season its new 50,720-seat home field, TCF Bank Stadium when the team hosted the Air Force Falcons.[2] For the third straight year, each Big Ten home game during the first three weeks of the season was broadcast nationally on ABC, ESPN, ESPN2 or the Big Ten Network, which televised more than 20 contests altogether in the opening weeks, including all nine home games in Week 1. Every ABC afternoon telecast was broadcast nationally, either on ABC or simultaneously on ESPN or ESPN2.[2] Note that although the Big Ten is a regional conference the Big Ten Network, which was available in 19 of the 20 largest U.S. media markets,[30] was available to approximately 73 million homes in the U.S. and Canada through agreements with more than 250 cable television or satellite television affiliates.[2]

The season began amidst allegations that Michigan was working its players beyond the extent permissible by the NCAA.[31] Nonetheless, the conference had its fifth ten-win week during the opening weekend.[32] During week 3, the Ohio State-USC game became the most-viewed college football game in ESPN history. After three weeks, the Big Ten Conference was the only Football Bowl Subdivision conference with five 3–0 teams.[33]

Homecoming games[edit]

September 26

  • Michigan 36, Indiana 33 (Michigan's record in homecoming games is 83-26)† [34]

October 3

  • Northwestern 27, Purdue 21 (Purdue's record in homecoming games is 48-35-4)† [35]

October 10

  • Michigan State 24, Illinois 14 (Illinois's record in homecoming games is 42-55-2)† [36]
  • Iowa 30, Michigan 28 (Iowa's record in homecoming games is 52-41-5)† [37]
  • Minnesota 35, Purdue 20 (Minnesota's record in homecoming games is 54-33-3)† [38]

October 17

  • Indiana 27, Illinois 14 (Indiana's record in homecoming games is 43-48-6)† [39]
  • Michigan State 24, Northwestern 14 (Michigan State's record in homecoming games is 61-30-3)† [40]
  • Penn State 20, Minnesota 0 (Penn State's record in homecoming games is 65-20-5)† [41]
  • Iowa 20, Wisconsin 10 (Wisconsin's record in homecoming games is 52-45-5)† [42]

October 24

  • Northwestern 29, Indiana 28 11:00 a.m. CT [43]
  • Ohio State 38, Minnesota 7 (Ohio State's record in homecoming games is 64-19-5)† [44]

† denotes record after the game

Schedule[edit]

Index to colors and formatting
Big 10 member won
Big 10 member lost
Big 10 teams in bold

Week one[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
September 3 8:00 PM Eastern Kentucky Indiana Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN Big Ten Network W 19–13   36,759
September 5 12:00 PM Towson Northwestern Ryan FieldEvanston, IL Big Ten Network W 47–14   17,587
September 5 12:00 PM Montana State Michigan State Spartan StadiumLansing, MI Big Ten Network W 44–3   74,518
September 5 12:00 PM Minnesota Syracuse Carrier DomeSyracuse, NY ESPN2 W 23–20   74,518
September 5 12:00 PM Navy Ohio State Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH ESPN W 31–27   105,092
September 5 12:00 PM Akron Penn State Beaver StadiumUniversity Park, PA Big Ten Network W 31–7   104,968
September 5 12:00 PM Toledo Purdue Ross-Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN Big Ten Network W 52–31   47,551
September 5 12:05 PM Northern Iowa Iowa Kinnick StadiumIowa City, IA Big Ten Network W 17–16   70,585
September 5 3:30 PM Western Michigan Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI ABC W 31–7   109,019
September 5 3:40 PM Missouri Illinois Edward Jones DomeSt. Louis, MO ESPN L 37–9   64,215
September 5 7:00 PM Northern Illinois Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI Big Ten Network W 28–20   80,532
#Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Week two[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
September 12 12:00 PM Eastern Michigan Northwestern Ryan Field • Evanston, IL Big Ten Network W 27–24   19,239
September 12 12:00 PM Western Michigan Indiana Memorial Stadium • Bloomington, IN Big Ten Network W 23–19   35,162
September 12 12:00 PM Central Michigan Michigan State Spartan Stadium • East Lansing, MI ESPN2 L 29–27   76,221
September 12 12:00 PM Syracuse Penn State Beaver Stadium • University Park, PA Big Ten Network W 28–7   106,387
September 12 12:00 PM Fresno State Wisconsin Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, WI ESPN W 34–31   80,353
September 12 12:05 PM Iowa Iowa State Jack Trice StadiumAmes, IA Fox Sports Net W 35–3   52,089
September 12 3:30 PM Notre Dame Michigan Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ABC W 38–34   110,278
September 12 7:00 PM Air Force Minnesota TCF Bank StadiumMinneapolis, MN Big Ten Network W 20–13   50,805
September 12 7:00 PM Illinois State Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL Big Ten Network W 45–17   62,347
September 12 8:00 PM USC Ohio State Ohio Stadium • Columbus, OH ESPN L 18–15   106,033
September 12 10:15 PM Purdue Oregon Autzen StadiumEugene, OR Fox Sports Net L 38–36   57,772
#Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Week three[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
September 19 12:00 p.m. ET Eastern Michigan Eagles Michigan Wolverines Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, Michigan Big Ten Network W 45–17 107,903
September 19 12:00 p.m. ET California Golden Bears Minnesota Golden Gophers TCF Bank Stadium • Minneapolis, Minnesota ESPN L 35–21 50,805
September 19 12:00 p.m. ET Temple Owls Penn State Nittany Lions Beaver Stadium • University Park, Pennsylvania Big Ten Network W 31–6 105,514
September 19 12:00 p.m. ET Wofford Terriers Wisconsin Badgers Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, Wisconsin Big Ten Network W 44–14 78,253
September 19 12:00 p.m. ET Northern Illinois Huskies Purdue Boilermakers Ross-Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, Indiana Big Ten Network L 28–21 53,240
September 19 12:00 p.m. ET Ohio State Buckeyes Toledo Rockets Cleveland Browns Stadium • Cleveland, Ohio W 38–0 71,727
September 19 3:30 p.m. ET Michigan State Spartans Notre Dame Fighting Irish Notre Dame Stadium • Notre Dame, Indiana NBC L 33–30 80,795
September 19 3:30 p.m. ET Indiana Hoosiers Akron Zips InfoCision Stadium • Akron, Ohio ESPNU W 38–21 18,340
September 19 3:35 p.m. ET Arizona Wildcats Iowa Hawkeyes Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, Iowa ABC W 27–17 70,585
September 19 7:00 p.m. ET Northwestern Wildcats Syracuse Orange Carrier Dome • Syracuse, New York L 37–34 40,251

Week four[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
September 26 12:00 p.m. ET Minnesota Golden Gophers Northwestern Wildcats Ryan Field • Evanston, Illinois Big Ten Network MINN 35–24 22,091
September 26 12:00 p.m. ET Indiana Hoosiers Michigan Wolverines Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, Michigan ESPN2 MICH 36–33 108,118
September 26 12:00 p.m. ET Michigan State Spartans Wisconsin Badgers Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, Wisconsin ESPN WIS 38–30 80,123
September 26 3:30 p.m. ET Illinois Fighting Illini Ohio State Buckeyes Ohio Stadium • Columbus, Ohio ABC OSU 30–0 105,219
September 26 8:00 p.m. ET Iowa Hawkeyes Penn State Nittany Lions Beaver Stadium • University Park, Pennsylvania ABC IOWA 21–10 109,316
September 26 8:00 p.m. ET Notre Dame Fighting Irish Purdue Boilermakers Ross-Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, Indiana ESPN L 24–21 56,452

Week five[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
October 3 12:00 p.m. ET Michigan Wolverines Michigan State Spartans Spartan Stadium • East Lansing, Michigan Big Ten Network MSU 26–20 78,629
October 3 12:00 p.m. ET Wisconsin Badgers Minnesota Golden Gophers TCF Bank Stadium • Minneapolis, Minnesota ESPN WIS 31–28 50,805
October 3 12:00 p.m. ET Northwestern Wildcats Purdue Boilermakers Ross-Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, Indiana Big Ten Network NU 27–21 47,163
October 3 12:05 p.m. ET Arkansas State Red Wolves Iowa Hawkeyes Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, Iowa ESPN2 W 24–21 67,989
October 3 3:30 p.m. ET Penn State Nittany Lions Illinois Fighting Illini Memorial Stadium • Champaign, Illinois ABC PSU 35–17 62,870
October 3 7:00 p.m. ET Ohio State Buckeyes Indiana Hoosiers Memorial Stadium • Bloomington, Indiana Big Ten Network OSU 33–14 51,500

Week six[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
October 10 12:00 p.m. ET Miami RedHawks Northwestern Wildcats Ryan Field • Evanston, Illinois Big Ten Network W 16–6 23,085
October 10 12:00 p.m. ET Purdue Boilermakers Minnesota Golden Gophers TCF Bank Stadium • Minneapolis, Minnesota ESPN2 MINN 35–20 50,805
October 10 12:00 p.m. ET Eastern Illinois Panthers Penn State Nittany Lions Beaver Stadium • University Park, Pennsylvania ESPN Classic PSU 52–3 104,488
October 10 12:00 p.m. ET Michigan State Spartans Illinois Fighting Illini Memorial Stadium • Champaign, Illinois Big Ten Network MSU 24–14 62,870
October 10 3:30 p.m. ET Wisconsin Badgers Ohio State Buckeyes Ohio Stadium • Columbus, Ohio ABC OSU 31–13 105,301
October 10 3:30 p.m. ET Indiana Hoosiers Virginia Cavaliers Scott StadiumCharlottesville, Virginia L 47–7 45,371
October 10 8:05 p.m. ET Michigan Wolverines Iowa Hawkeyes Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, Iowa ABC IOWA 30–28 70,585

Week seven[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
October 17 12:00 p.m. ET Northwestern Wildcats Michigan State Spartans Spartan Stadium • East Lansing, Michigan ESPN2 MSU 24-14 71,726
October 17 12:00 p.m. ET Delaware State Hornets Michigan Wolverines Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, Michigan Big Ten Network W 63-6 106,304
October 17 12:00 p.m. ET Iowa Hawkeyes Wisconsin Badgers Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, Wisconsin ESPN IOWA 20-10 81,043
October 17 12:00 p.m. ET Ohio State Buckeyes Purdue Boilermakers Ross-Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, Indiana Big Ten Network PUR 26-18 50,404
October 17 3:30 p.m. ET Minnesota Golden Gophers Penn State Nittany Lions Beaver Stadium • University Park, Pennsylvania ABC PSU 20–0 107,981
October 17 7:00 p.m. ET Illinois Fighting Illini Indiana Hoosiers Memorial Stadium • Bloomington, Indiana Big Ten Network IND 27–14 42,358

Week eight[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
October 24 12:00 p.m. ET Indiana Hoosiers Northwestern Wildcats Ryan Field • Evanston, Illinois Big Ten Network NU 29–28 24,364
October 24 12:00 p.m. ET Minnesota Golden Gophers Ohio State Buckeyes Ohio Stadium • Columbus, Ohio ESPN OSU 38–7 105,011
October 24 12:00 p.m. ET Illinois Fighting Illini Purdue Boilermakers Ross-Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, Indiana ESPN2 PUR 24–14 47,349
October 24 3:30 p.m. ET Penn State Nittany Lions Michigan Wolverines Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, Michigan ABC PSU 35–10 110,377
October 24 7:00 p.m. ET Iowa Hawkeyes Michigan State Spartans Spartan Stadium • East Lansing, Michigan Big Ten Network IOWA 15–13 74,411

Week nine[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
October 31 12:00 p.m. ET New Mexico State Aggies Ohio State Buckeyes Ohio Stadium • Columbus, Ohio Big Ten Network W 45–0 104,719
October 31 12:00 p.m. ET Indiana Hoosiers Iowa Hawkeyes Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, Iowa ESPN IOWA 42–24 70,585
October 31 12:00 p.m. ET Purdue Boilermakers Wisconsin Badgers Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, Wisconsin ESPN2 WIS 37–0 79,920
October 31 3:30 p.m. ET Michigan Wolverines Illinois Fighting Illini Memorial Stadium • Champaign, Illinois ABC ILL 38–13 60,119
October 31 4:30 p.m. ET Penn State Nittany Lions Northwestern Wildcats Ryan Field • Evanston, Illinois ESPN PSU 34–13 30,546
October 31 8:00 p.m. ET Michigan State Spartans Minnesota Golden Gophers TCF Bank Stadium • Minneapolis, Minnesota Big Ten Network MINN 42–34 50,805

Week ten[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
November 7 12:00 p.m. ET Wisconsin Badgers Indiana Hoosiers Memorial Stadium • Bloomington, Indiana Big Ten Network WIS 31–28 36,611
November 7 12:00 p.m. ET Western Michigan Broncos Michigan State Spartans Spartan Stadium • East Lansing, Michigan Big Ten Network W 49–14 73,910
November 7 12:00 p.m. ET Purdue Boilermakers Michigan Wolverines Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, Michigan Big Ten Network PUR 38–36 108,543
November 7 12:00 p.m. ET Illinois Fighting Illini Minnesota Golden Gophers TCF Bank Stadium • Minneapolis, Minnesota Big Ten Network ILL 35–32 50,805
November 7 12:00 p.m. ET Northwestern Wildcats Iowa Hawkeyes Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, Iowa ESPN NW 17–10 70,585
November 7 3:30 p.m. ET Ohio State Buckeyes Penn State Nittany Lions Beaver Stadium • University Park, Pennsylvania ABC OSU 24–7 110,033

Week eleven[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
November 14 12:00 p.m. ET South Dakota State Jackrabbits Minnesota Golden Gophers TCF Bank Stadium • Minneapolis, Minnesota Big Ten Network W 16–13 50,805
November 14 12:00 p.m. ET Indiana Hoosiers Penn State Nittany Lions Beaver Stadium • University Park, Pennsylvania Big Ten Network PSU 31–20 107,379
November 14 12:00 p.m. ET Michigan Wolverines Wisconsin Badgers Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, Wisconsin Big Ten Network WIS 45–24 80,540
November 14 12:00 p.m. ET Northwestern Wildcats Illinois Fighting Illini Memorial Stadium • Champaign, Illinois ESPN Classic NU 21–16 60,523
November 14 12:00 p.m. ET Michigan State Spartans Purdue Boilermakers Ross-Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, Indiana ESPN MSU 40–37 48,408
November 14 3:30 p.m. ET Iowa Hawkeyes Ohio State Buckeyes Ohio Stadium • Columbus, Ohio ABC OSU 27–24 105,455

Week twelve[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
November 21 3:30 p.m. ET Wisconsin Badgers Northwestern Wildcats Ryan Field • Evanston, Illinois Big Ten Network NU 33–31 32,150
November 21 3:30 p.m. ET Purdue Boilermakers Indiana Hoosiers Memorial Stadium • Bloomington, Indiana Big Ten Network PUR 38–21 48,607
November 21 3:30 p.m. ET Penn State Nittany Lions Michigan State Spartans Spartan Stadium • East Lansing, Michigan ABC PSU 42–14 73,771
November 21 12:00 p.m. ET Ohio State Buckeyes Michigan Wolverines Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, Michigan ABC OSU 21–10 110,922
November 21 12:00 p.m. ET Minnesota Golden Gophers Iowa Hawkeyes Kinnick Stadium • Iowa City, Iowa ESPN IOWA 12–0 70,585

Week thirteen[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
November 27 12:00 p.m. ET Illinois Fighting Illini Cincinnati Bearcats Nippert StadiumCincinnati, Ohio ABC L 49–36 35,106

Week fourteen[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
December 5 11:30 PM ET Wisconsin Badgers Hawaii Warriors Aloha StadiumHonolulu, Hawaii ESPN2 W 55–10 40,069
December 5 12:30 PM ET Fresno State Bulldogs Illinois Fighting Illini Memorial Stadium • Champaign, Illinois Big Ten Network L 53–52 48,538

Records against other conferences[edit]

The following summarizes the Big Ten's record this season vs. other conferences.[45]

Conference Wins Losses
ACC 2 1
Big 12 1 3
Big East 2 2
Big Sky 1 0
Colonial Athletic 1 0
MEAC 1 0
Independents 2 2
MAC 12 2
Missouri Valley 3 0
Mountain West 1 0
Ohio Valley 2 0
Pac-10 2 3
SEC 1 1
Southern 1 0
Sun Belt 1 0
WAC 3 1
Overall 36 15

Big Ten vs. BCS matchups[edit]

During the season, Big Ten teams played several games against BCS conference opponents. Some of these games are regularly contested rivalry games.

Date Visitor Home Significance Winning Team
September 5 Missouri Illinois Arch Rivalry Missouri
September 5 Minnesota Syracuse Minnesota
September 12 Iowa Iowa State Cy-Hawk Trophy Iowa
September 12 Notre Dame Michigan Michigan – Notre Dame rivalry Michigan
September 12 USC Ohio State Both ranked in the top 10 USC
September 12 Syracuse Penn State Penn State
September 12 Purdue Oregon Oregon
September 19 Arizona Iowa Iowa
September 19 Michigan State Notre Dame Megaphone Trophy Notre Dame
September 19 Cal Minnesota Cal
September 19 Northwestern Syracuse Syracuse
September 26 Notre Dame Purdue Shillelagh Trophy Notre Dame
October 10 Indiana Virginia Virginia
November 27 Illinois Cincinnati Cincinnati

Bowl games[edit]

On December 6, the Bowl matchups were announced.[46] It marked the fifth consecutive season that at least seven Big Ten teams earned bowl game invitations and the ninth time in twelve-year history of the Bowl Championship Series that the conference was awarded two BCS invitations.[47]

Bowl Game Date Stadium City Television Matchups/Result Payout (US$)[48]
Champs Sports Bowl December 29, 2009 8:00 PM ET Citrus Bowl Orlando, Florida ESPN Wisconsin 20, Miami 14 $2,130,000
Insight Bowl December 31, 2009 6:00 PM ET Sun Devil Stadium Tempe, Arizona NFL Network Iowa State 14, Minnesota 13 $1,200,000
Outback Bowl January 1, 2010 11:00 AM ET Raymond James Stadium Tampa, Florida ESPN Auburn 38, Northwestern 35 (OT) $3,100,000
Capital One January 1, 2010 1:00 PM ET Citrus Bowl Orlando, Florida ABC Penn State 19, LSU 17 $4,250,000
Rose Bowl* January 1, 2010 5:10 PM ET Rose Bowl Pasadena, California ABC Ohio State 26, Oregon 17 $17,000,000
Alamo Bowl January 2, 2010 9:00 PM ET Alamodome San Antonio, Texas ESPN Texas Tech 41, Michigan State 31 $2,250,000
Orange Bowl* January 5, 2010 8:00 PM ET Land Shark Stadium Miami Gardens, Florida FOX Iowa 24 vs. Georgia Tech 14 $17,000,000
(*)denotes BCS game
Big Ten team and score in bold
Winning team and score listed first in italics

Players of the week[edit]

Throughout the conference regular season, the Big Ten offices named offensive, defensive and special teams players of the week each Sunday.

Week Offensive Defensive Special teams
Player Team Player Team Player Team
9/6/09[49] Daryll Clark
Ralph Bolden
PSU
PUR
Lee Campbell MINN Jeremiha Hunter
Eric Ellestad
IOWA
MINN
9/13/09[50] Tate Forcier MICH Tyler Sash
Nate Triplett
IOWA
MINN
Darryl Stonum MICH
9/20/09[51] Carlos Brown
Mike Kafka
MICH
NU
Sean Lee PSU Ryan Donahue
Chris Borland
IOWA
WIS
9/27/09[52] Scott Tolzien WIS Pat Angerer IOWA Adrian Clayborn IOWA
10/4/09[53] John Clay WIS O'Brien Schofield WIS Stefan Demos
Jeremy Boone
NU
PSU
10/11/09[54] Tony Moeaki IOWA Ross Homan OSU Zoltan Mesko MICH
10/18/09[55] Ben Chappell
Blair White
IND
MSU
Ryan Kerrigan PUR Carson Wiggs PUR
10/25/09[56] Daryll Clark (2) PSU Adrian Clayborn IOWA Thaddeus Gibson
Stefan Demos (2)
OSU
NU
11/1/09[57] Adam Weber MINN Garrett Brown
Chris Borland
MINN
WIS
Keshawn Martin MSU
11/8/09[58] Joey Elliott PUR Cameron Heyward OSU Ray Small OSU
11/15/09[59] Scott Tolzien (2) WIS Navorro Bowman PSU Brett Swenson MSU
11/22/09[60] Mike Kafka (2)
Daryll Clark (3)
NU
PSU
Troy Johnson
Navorro Bowman (2)
IOWA
PSU
Stefan Demos (3) NU
11/29/09[61] Juice Williams ILL -- -- Derek Dimke ILL
12/06/09[62] Mikel Leshoure
John Clay (2)
ILL
WIS
J. J. Watt WIS David Gilreath WIS

Big Ten Conference football individual honors[edit]

2009 co-MVPs

Brandon Graham attempting to sack Terrell Prior in 2008
Daryll Clark handing off to Evan Royster in 2007
Tackle Gabe Carimi

At the conclusion of week 12, the coaches and media made Big Ten Conference football individual honors selections. John Clay was selected as offensive player of the year by both the coaches and the media. Jared Odrick and Greg Jones won defensive player of the year awards from the coaches and media, respectively. Bryan Bulaga and Odrick were selected as offensive and defensive linemen of the year. Chris Borland was freshman of the year and Kirk Ferentz was Coach of the Year.[63] The Chicago Tribune Silver Football recipients as the Big Ten co-MVPs were Daryll Clark and Brandon Graham, marking the first time the award has been shared.[64][65]

All-Conference[edit]

The following players were selected as All-Big Ten at the conclusion of the season.[63]

Coaches Media
OFFENSE FIRST TEAM SECOND TEAM FIRST TEAM SECOND TEAM
Quarterback Daryll Clark PSU Mike Kafka NU Daryll Clark PSU Mike Kafka NU
Running Back Evan Royster PSU Brandon Saine OSU Evan Royster PSU Brandon Saine OSU
Running Back John Clay WIS Ralph Bolden PUR John Clay WIS Ralph Bolden PUR
Receiver Eric Decker MINN Tandon Doss* IND Tandon Doss IND Blair White MSU
Receiver Blair White MSU Derrell Johnson-Koulianos* IOWA Keith Smith PUR Zeke Markshausen NU
Keith Smith* PUR
Center Stefen Wisniewski PSU Rafael Eubanks* IOWA Stefen Wisniewski PSU Rafael Eubanks IOWA
Joel Nitchman* MSU
Guard Dace Richardson IOWA Jon Asamoah ILL Justin Boren OSU Jon Asamoah ILL
Guard John Moffitt WIS Justin Boren OSU John Moffitt WIS Dace Richardson IOWA
Tackle Bryan Bulaga IOWA Rodger Saffold IND Bryan Bulaga IOWA Kyle Calloway IOWA
Tackle Dennis Landolt PSU Gabe Carimi WIS Gabe Carimi WIS Dennis Landolt PSU
Tight End Tony Moeaki IOWA Garrett Graham WIS Garrett Graham WIS Tony Moeaki IOWA
Kicker Brett Swenson MSU Stefan Demos NU Brett Swenson MSU Stefan Demos NU
DEFENSE FIRST TEAM SECOND TEAM FIRST TEAM SECOND TEAM
Line Adrian Clayborn IOWA Jammie Kirlew Adrian Clayborn IOWA Jammie Kirlew IND
Line Brandon Graham MICH Thaddeus Gibson OSU Brandon Graham MICH Thaddeus Gibson OSU
Line Jared Odrick PSU Cameron Heyward OSU Ryan Kerrigan PUR Cameron Heyward OSU
Line O'Brien Schofield WIS Ryan Kerrigan PUR O'Brien Schofield WIS Jared Odrick PSU
Linebacker Pat Angerer IOWA A. J. Edds IOWA Pat Angerer IOWA Ross Homan OSU
Linebacker Greg Jones MSU Ross Homan OSU Greg Jones MSU Josh Hull PSU
Linebacker Navorro Bowman PSU Sean Lee PSU Navorro Bowman PSU Sean Lee PSU
Defensive Back Tyler Sash IOWA Donovan Warren* MICH Tyler Sash IOWA Brett Greenwood IOWA
Defensive Back Amari Spievey IOWA Sherrick McManis* NU Donovan Warren MICH Amari Spievey IOWA
Defensive Back Brad Phillips NU Brandon King* PUR Sherrick McManis NU Brad Phillips NU
Defensive Back Kurt Coleman OSU David Pender* PUR Kurt Coleman OSU David Pender PUR
Jay Valai* WIS
Punter Zoltan Mesko MICH Jeremy Boone PSU Zoltan Mesko MICH Jeremy Boone PSU
  • Additional honorees due to ties

Position key[edit]

Back B Center C Cornerback CB Defensive back DB
Defensive end DE Defensive lineman DL Defensive tackle DT End E
Fullback FB Guard G Halfback HB Kicker K
Kickoff returner KR Offensive tackle OT Offensive lineman OL Linebacker LB
Long snapper LS Punter P Punt returner PR Quarterback QB
Running back RB Safety S Tight end TE Wide receiver WR

All-Americans[edit]

The following players were chosen as All-Americans for the Associated Press, American Football Coaches Association, ESPN, Football Writers Association of America, CBS Sports, Sports Illustrated, Rivals.com, Scout.com, College Football News, Walter Camp Football Foundation or the Pro Football Weekly teams.[66][67][68][69][70][71][72][73][74][75][74][76][77][78][79]

Name School Pos. 1st team 2nd team other
Greg Jones Michigan State LB Associated Press, AFCA-Coaches, ESPN, FWAA-Writers, CBS Sports, Sports Illustrated, Rivals.com, Scout.com, College Football News WCFF Pro Football Weekly
Pat Angerer Iowa LB FWAA-Writers, Sports Illustrated, Rivals.com, College Football News CBS Sports, WCFF, Scout.com, Associated Press
Brandon Graham Michigan DE ESPN, Rivals.com, Scout.com WCFF, Sporting News, Associated Press, Sports Illustrated, College Football News Pro Football Weekly
Jared Odrick Penn State DT AFCA-coaches, CBS Sports Rivals.com, Associated Press Pro Football Weekly
Tyler Sash Iowa S CBS Sports Rivals.com, Sports Illustrated, College Football News Associated Press
Bryan Bulaga Iowa OT Sporting News WCFF, Rivals.com, Scout.com, Associated Press Sports Illustrated, College Football News, Pro Football Weekly
Kurt Coleman Ohio State S Sporting News Sports Illustrated
Navorro Bowman Penn State LB CBS Sports, Sporting News, Rivals.com, Sports Illustrated Associated Press, College Football News, Pro Football Weekly
Zoltan Mesko Michigan P WCFF, Rivals.com, Scout.com, Associated Press Sports Illustrated, College Football News, Pro Football Weekly
Jon Asamoah Illinois OL Sporting News Pro Football Weekly
Ryan Kerrigan Purdue DE Rivals.com Sports Illustrated, College Football News
Amari Spievey Iowa CB Rivals.com Pro Football Weekly
O'Brien Schofield Wisconsin DL Scout.com Sports Illustrated, College Football News, Pro Football Weekly
Dace Richardson Iowa OL CBS Sports
Dennis Landolt Penn State OT Associated Press
John Clay Wisconsin RB Sports Illustrated, College Football News
Adrian Clayborn Iowa DL Sports Illustrated
Ross Homan Ohio State LB Sports Illustrated
Sherrick McManis Michigan State DL Sports Illustrated
Brett Swenson Michigan State K Sports Illustrated, College Football News
Ray Fisher Indiana KR Sports Illustrated, College Football News
Stefen Wisniewski Penn State C College Football News, Pro Football Weekly
Daryll Clark Penn State QB College Football News, Pro Football Weekly
Keith Smith Purdue WR College Football News
Garrett Graham Wisconsin TE College Football News, Pro Football Weekly
Tony Moeaki Iowa TE College Football News
Keshawn Martin Michigan State KR College Football News
Ricky Stanzi Iowa QB Pro Football Weekly
Marvin McNutt Iowa WR Pro Football Weekly
Cameron Heyward Ohio State DE Pro Football Weekly
Adrian Clayborn Iowa DE Pro Football Weekly
Sean Lee Penn State LB Pro Football Weekly

All-Star Games[edit]

The following players were selected to play in post season All-Star Games:

January 23, 2010 East-West Shrine Game

Kafka earned offensive MVP; Shofield was named defensive MVP, and White led all receivers with seven catches for 93 yards.[80]

January 30 2010 Senior Bowl

Brandon Graham earned MVP honors with five tackles, two sacks, one forced fumble.[81]

February 6, 2010 Texas vs. The Nation Game[82][83][84]

All Big Ten Players represented the nation.

Statistics[edit]

The Big Ten had two national statistical leaders: Brandon Graham led the nation with 2.17 tackles for a loss per game ahead of national second place finisher O'Brien Schofield and Ray Fisher led the nation in kickoff return average with 37.35. Greg Jones ranked third nationally in tackles per game at 11.85 followed closely by Pat Angerer who finished fourth. Ryan Kerrigan finished third in quarterback sacks per game with 1.08.[85]

The Big Ten saw several career and single-season Big Ten records fall. Mike Kafka broke Drew Brees 1998 record for single-season offensive plays (642 vs. 638). Fisher's return average was a Big Ten single-season record, surpassing the 1965 record. Troy Stoudermire accumulated 43 kickoff returns, which tied Earl Douthitt's 1973 single-season total. David Gilreath's 108 career kickoff returns surpassed the 106 set by Brandon Williams (2002–05) and Derrick Mason (1993–96). Other near single-season records were Tyler Sash's 203 interception return yards, which fell short of the 207 set in 2003 by Alan Zemaitis and Ryan Kerrigan's 7 forced fumbles, which was short of the 8 set by Jonal Saint-Dic in 2007.[45] Jim Tressel became the second head coach to secure five consecutive Big Ten championships.[86]

Attendance[edit]

In 2009, the Big Ten established a new overall conference attendance record with 5,526,237 fans attending 77 home games. This surpassed the previous record set in 2002 when a total of 5,499,439 was reached in 78 contests.[47] Below is a table of home game attendances.[87]

Team Stadium Capacity Game 1 Game 2 Game 3 Game 4 Game 5 Game 6 Game 7 Game 8 Total Average % of Capacity
Illinois Memorial Stadium 62,872 62,347 62,870 62,870 60,119 60,523 308,729 61,745 98.2
Indiana Memorial Stadium 52,692 36,759 35,162 51,500 42,358 36,611 48,607 250,997 41,832 79.3
Iowa Kinnick Stadium 70,585 70,585 70,585 67,989 70,585 70,585 70,585 70,585 491,490 70,212 99.4
Michigan Michigan Stadium 106,201 109,019 110,278 107,903 108,118 106,304 110,377 108,543 110,922 871,464 108,933 102.5
Michigan State Spartan Stadium 75,005 74,518 76,221 78,629 71,726 74,411 73,910 73,771 523,186 74,740 99.6
Minnesota TCF Bank Stadium 50,805 50,805 50,805 50,805 50,805 50,805 50,805 50,805 346,635 50,805 100.0
Northwestern Ryan Field 47,130 17,857 19,239 22,091 23,085 24,364 30,546 32,150 169,332 24,190 51.3
Ohio State Ohio Stadium 102,329 105,092 106,033 105,219 105,301 105,011 104,719 105,455 736,830 105,261 102.8
Penn State Beaver Stadium 107,282 104,968 106,387 105,514 109,316 104,488 107,981 110,033 107,379 856,369 107,046 99.7
Purdue Ross-Ade Stadium 62,500 47,551 53,240 59,082 47,163 50,404 47,349 48,408 353,197 50,456 80.7
Wisconsin Camp Randall Stadium 80,321 80,532 80,355 78,253 80,123 81,043 79,920 80,540 560,746 80,106 99.7

Academic honors[edit]

26 Big Ten student-athletes were named to the Academic All-District teams presented by ESPN The Magazine, including 18 first-team selections: Illinois' Jon Asamoah, Indiana's Brandon Bugg, Trea Burgess and Ben Chappell, Michigan's Zoltan Mesko, Michigan State's Blair White, Minnesota's Eric Decker and Jeff Tow-Arnett, Northwestern's Doug Bartels, Stefan Demos and Zeke Markshausen, Penn State's Jeremy Boone, Josh Hull, Andrew Pitz and Stefen Wisniewski, Purdue's Joe Holland and Ryan Kerrigan and Wisconsin's Brad Nortman. The Nittany Lions were one of only six schools nationwide with four or more first-team selections. Second-team picks included the Hawkeyes' Julian Vandervelde, the Wolverines' Jon Conover, the Spartans' Adam Decker and Andrew Hawken and the Buckeyes' Bryant Browning, Todd Denlinger, Andrew Moses and Marcus Williams. To be eligible for the award, a player must be in at least his second year of athletic eligibility, be a first-team or key performer and carry a cumulative 3.30 grade point average. First-team selections will be added to the national ballot and are eligible for Academic All-America honors to be announced on November 24. Penn State's Hull and Pitz are looking to earn Academic All-America accolades for the second straight year.[25]

For the fifth consecutive season the Big Ten had more (8) student-athletes named to the ESPN The Magazine Academic All-America first or second teams in football than any other conference whether they be a member of the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) or the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). The Big Ten also had six of the fifteen first-team selections, which led the nation. FCS' Missouri Valley Conference was second with five first or second team selections and the FBS' Big 12 Conference had four honorees. Only the Big 12 and Southeastern Conference had two first team selections. The Academic All-America first-team honorees from the Big Ten include Zoltan Mesko, Blair White, Zeke Markshausen, Josh Hull, Andrew Pitz and Stefen Wisniewski. Second-team honors went to Northwestern's Stefan Demos and Purdue's Ryan Kerrigan. Hull and Pitz were repeat first-team selections.[88][89] The Big Ten conference also recognized 193 football players as fall term 2009-10 Academic All-Conference honorees, including Purdue's Joe Holland who has maintained a 4.0 Grade Point Average. The student-athletes honorees were letterwinners in at least their second academic year at their institution and who carry a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher.[90]

2010 NFL Draft[edit]

Main article: 2010 NFL Draft

The 2010 saw 34 Big Ten athletes selected. This included at least one representative from each member school, making the Big Ten one of only two conferences to have each of its members repreented among the draft selections. Iowa and Penn State each had six selections. The Big Ten had three first round selections: Big Ten Silver Football co-winner Brandon Graham was selected 13th overall by Philadelphia. Big Ten Offensive Lineman of the Year Bryan Bulaga 23rd by Green Bay, while Big Ten Defensive Player and Lineman of the Year Jared Odrick was chosen 28th overall by Miami.[91]

Round # Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
1 13 Philadelphia Eagles (from San Francisco via Denver) Brandon Graham Defensive end Michigan
1 23 Green Bay Packers Bryan Bulaga Offensive tackle Iowa
1 28 Miami Dolphins (from San Diego) Jared Odrick Defensive tackle Penn State
2 33 St. Louis Rams Rodger Saffold Offensive tackle Indiana
2 39 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (from Oakland) Arrelious Benn Wide receiver Illinois
2 55 Dallas Cowboys (from Philadelphia) Sean Lee Linebacker Penn State
2 56 Green Bay Packers Mike Neal Defensive tackle Purdue
2 63 Indianapolis Colts Pat Angerer Linebacker Iowa
3 66 Detroit Lions Amari Spievey Cornerback Iowa
3 68 Kansas City Chiefs Jon Asamoah Offensive guard Illinois
3 87 Denver Broncos (from Philadelphia) Eric Decker Wide receiver Minnesota
3 91 San Francisco 49ers (from San Diego) Navorro Bowman Linebacker Penn State
3 93 Kansas City Chiefs (from Minnesota via Houston) Tony Moeaki Tight end Iowa
4 109 Chicago Bears Corey Wootton Defensive end Northwestern
4 116 Pittsburgh Steelers Thaddeus Gibson Defensive end Ohio State
4 118 Houston Texans Garrett Graham Tight end Wisconsin
4 119 Miami Dolphins (from New England via Oakland, New England, and Dallas) A. J. Edds Linebacker Iowa
4 122 Philadelphia Eagles (from Green Bay) Mike Kafka Quarterback Northwestern
4 130 Arizona Cardinals (from New Orleans) O'Brien Schofield Defensive end Wisconsin
5 132 St. Louis Rams Michael Hoomanawanui Tight end Illinois
5 144 Houston Texans (from Carolina via Kansas City) Sherrick McManis Cornerback Northwestern
5 150 New England Patriots (from Houston) Zoltan Mesko Punter Michigan
5 154 Green Bay Packers Andrew Quarless Tight end Penn State
5 167 Minnesota Vikings Nathan Triplett Linebacker Minnesota
7 214 Minnesota Vikings (from Cleveland via Detroit) Mickey Shuler, Jr. Tight end Penn State
7 215 Oakland Raiders Jeremy Ware Cornerback Michigan State
7 216 Buffalo Bills Kyle Calloway Offensive tackle Iowa
7 232 Denver Broncos (from Baltimore via Tampa Bay) Jammie Kirlew Defensive end Indiana
7 242 Pittsburgh Steelers Doug Worthington Defensive end Ohio State
7 244 Philadelphia Eagles Kurt Coleman Safety Ohio State
7 246 Indianapolis Colts Ray Fisher Cornerback Indiana
7 251 Oakland Raiders Stevie Brown Safety Michigan
7 252 Miami Dolphins Austin Spitler Linebacker Ohio State
7 254 St. Louis Rams Josh Hull Linebacker Penn State

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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