2009 ICC Champions Trophy

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2009 ICC Champions Trophy
ICC-Champions-Trophy-2009.png
Administrator(s) International Cricket Council
Cricket format One Day International
Tournament format(s) Round-robin
Host(s)  South Africa
Champions  Australia (2nd title)
Participants 8
Matches played 15
Man of the Series Ricky Ponting (Aus)
Most runs 288Ricky Ponting (Aus)
Most wickets 11Wayne Parnell (SA)
2006
2013

The 2009 ICC Champions Trophy was a One Day International cricket tournament held in South Africa between 22 September and 5 October,[1] at Wanderers Stadium and Centurion Park, both in the Gauteng province.[2] It was the sixth ICC Champions Trophy, and was previously known as the ICC Knock-out. Two teams from two groups of four qualified for the semi-finals, and the final was staged in Centurion on 5 October. Australia won the tournament undefeated, beating New Zealand by six wickets in the final.

History[edit]

The Champions Trophy was the brainchild of Jagmohan Dalmiya, who was ICC president in the late 1990s. It had a dual aim of spreading the game to emerging nations and raising money for the ICC in between World Cups, thus enabling it to pump more cash into those fledgling cricket countries. The first tournament, labelled as a mini World Cup, was staged in Dhaka in October 1998 and raised more than £10 million. The second, in Nairobi, was a commercial success although the crowds stayed away. By the time the 2002 event was held – and there was disquiet as it was so close to the World Cup five months later – the idea of playing in developing nations had been ditched and as revenue-generation was the main raison d'etre, it needed to be in one of the main countries as this allowed the format to be expanded. In 2004 the jamboree moved to England and it became clear the format of group games led to too many meaningless games. By the time the 2006 tournament in India came into view, the event was under fire from some quarters, and at one time there were even hints that India might decline to take part in 2008.

Schedule and location[edit]

The tournament was originally scheduled to be held in Pakistan between 12 and 28 September 2008. The ICC postponed the tournament due to security fears expressed by several participating countries; many countries did not want to play in Pakistan after an attack on the Sri Lankan team by militants. On 24 July 2008, the International Cricket Council (ICC) announced that the tournament would take place in Pakistan after all despite players from Australia, England, South Africa and New Zealand raising concerns over touring the country.[3] On 22 August 2008, South Africa announced that it would not take part in the Champions Trophy due to security concerns.[4] Two days later, on 24 August 2008, after speculation that the tournament would be held elsewhere (England, Sri Lanka, or South Africa), the ICC announced that the tournament would be postponed until October 2009.[5]

At its meeting in January 2009, the ICC board decided to move the tournament out of Pakistan on security concerns. At the time, Sri Lanka was the favoured alternate host.[6] In March 2009, the ICC Chief Executives' Committee recommended to the ICC board that the tournament be held in South Africa as there were concerns that the weather in Sri Lanka during September and October could result in too many games being washed out.[7] The ICC board ratified the recommendation, and the event took place in South Africa between 22 September and 5 October 2009.[8] Matches will be played at Wanderers Stadium and Centurion Park, both in the Johannesburg area.[2]

Rules and regulations[edit]

The 2009 ICC Champions Trophy was contested by eight teams that had been seeded and divided into two groups. Each team played every other team in its group once. Points were allocated for each match in accordance with the system described below which applied throughout the competition. Following the group stage, the top two teams from each group progressed to the semi-finals, where the winner of Group A played the runner up of Group B (in the 1st semi-final) and the winner of Group B played the runner up of Group A (in the 2nd semi-final). The winners of the semi-finals contested the final.

Points system[edit]

Results Points
Win 2 points
Tie/No Result 1 point
Loss 0 points

Squads[edit]

Group stage[edit]

Group A[edit]

Team Pld W L T NR NRR Pts
 Australia 3 2 0 0 1 +0.510 5
 Pakistan 3 2 1 0 0 +0.999 4
 India 3 1 1 0 1 +0.290 3
 West Indies 3 0 3 0 0 −1.537 0

23 September 2009
14:30
Scorecard
West Indies 
133 (34.3 overs)
v
 Pakistan
134/5 (30.3 overs)
Nikita Miller 51 (57)
Mohammad Aamer 3/24 [7]
Umar Akmal 41* (51)
Gavin Tonge 4/25 [10]
Pakistan won by 5 wickets
New Wanderers Stadium, Johannesburg
Umpires: Steve Davis (Aus) and Daryl Harper (Aus)
Player of the match: Umar Akmal (Pak)

26 September 2009
09:30
Scorecard
Australia 
275/8 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
225 (46.5 overs)
Ricky Ponting 79 (95)
Nikita Miller 2/24 [10]
Travis Dowlin 55 (87)
Nathan Hauritz 2/23 [7.5]
Australia won by 50 runs
New Wanderers Stadium, Johannesburg
Umpires: Asad Rauf (Pak) and Tony Hill (NZ)
Player of the match: Mitchell Johnson (Aus)

26 September 2009
14:30
Scorecard
Pakistan 
302/9 (50 overs)
v
 India
248 (44.5 overs)
Shoaib Malik 128 (126)
Ashish Nehra 4/55 [10]
Rahul Dravid 76 (103)
Saeed Ajmal 2/31 [8.5]
Pakistan won by 54 runs
SuperSport Park, Centurion
Umpires: Steve Davis (Aus) and Simon Taufel (Aus)
Player of the match: Shoaib Malik (Pak)

28 September 2009
14:30
Scorecard
Australia 
234/4 (42.3 overs)
v
Michael Hussey 67 (65)
Ashish Nehra 1/38 [8]
No result
SuperSport Park, Centurion
Umpires: Billy Bowden (NZ) and Ian Gould (Eng)
  • Match abandoned owing to rain.

30 September 2009
09:30
Scorecard
Pakistan 
205/6 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
206/8 (50 overs)
Mohammad Yousuf 45 (69)
Shane Watson 2/32 [8]
Michael Hussey 64 (87)
Saeed Ajmal 2/31 [10]
Australia won by 2 wickets
SuperSport Park, Centurion
Umpires: Billy Bowden (NZ) and Tony Hill (NZ)
Player of the match: Michael Hussey (Aus)

30 September 2009
14:30
Scorecard
West Indies 
129 (36 overs)
v
 India
130/3 (32.1 overs)
Darren Sammy 23 (38)
Praveen Kumar 3/22 [9]
Virat Kohli 79* (104)
Kemar Roach 1/27 [6]
India won by 7 wickets
New Wanderers Stadium, Johannesburg
Umpires: Aleem Dar (Pak) and Simon Taufel (Aus)
Player of the match: Virat Kohli (Ind)

Group B[edit]

Team Pld W L T NR NRR Pts
 New Zealand 3 2 1 0 0 +0.782 4
 England 3 2 1 0 0 −0.487 4
 Sri Lanka 3 1 2 0 0 −0.085 2
 South Africa 3 1 2 0 0 −0.177 2

22 September 2009
14:30
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
319/8 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
206/7 (37.4 overs)
Graeme Smith 58 (44)
Ajantha Mendis 3/30 [7]
Sri Lanka won by 55 runs (D/L method)
SuperSport Park, Centurion
Umpires: Ian Gould (Eng) and Simon Taufel (Aus)
Player of the match: Tillakaratne Dilshan (SL)
  • Rain limited South Africa's innings to 37.4 overs.

24 September 2009
09:30
Scorecard
New Zealand 
214 (47.5 overs)
v
 South Africa
217/5 (41.1 overs)
Ross Taylor 72 (106)
Wayne Parnell 5/57 [8]
AB de Villiers 70 (76)
Daryl Tuffey 2/52 [9]
South Africa won by 5 wickets
SuperSport Park, Centurion
Umpires: Aleem Dar (Pak) and Asad Rauf (Pak)
Player of the match: Wayne Parnell (SA)

25 September 2009
14:30
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
212 (47.3 overs)
v
 England
213/4 (45 overs)
Thilina Kandamby 53 (82)
James Anderson 3/20 [9.3]
England won by 6 wickets
New Wanderers Stadium, Johannesburg
Umpires: Aleem Dar (Pak) and Billy Bowden (NZ)
Player of the match: Paul Collingwood (Eng)

27 September 2009
09:30
Scorecard
New Zealand 
315/7 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
277 (46.4 overs)
Jesse Ryder 74 (58)
Sanath Jayasuriya 3/39 [10]
Mahela Jayawardene 77 (85)
Kyle Mills 3/69 [10]
New Zealand won by 38 runs
New Wanderers Stadium, Johannesburg
Umpires: Ian Gould (Eng) and Daryl Harper (Aus)
Player of the match: Daniel Vettori (NZ)

27 September 2009
14:30
Scorecard
England 
323/8 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
301/9 (50 overs)
Owais Shah 98 (89)
Wayne Parnell 3/60 [10]
Graeme Smith 141 (134)
James Anderson 3/42 [10]
England won by 22 runs
SuperSport Park, Centurion
Umpires: Steve Davis (Aus) and Tony Hill (NZ)
Player of the match: Owais Shah (Eng)

29 September 2009
14:30
Scorecard
England 
146 (43.1 overs)
v
 New Zealand
147/6 (27.1 overs)
Martin Guptill 53 (55)
Stuart Broad 4/39 [8.1]
New Zealand won by 4 wickets
New Wanderers Stadium, Johannesburg
Umpires: Asad Rauf (Pak) and Daryl Harper (Aus)
Player of the match: Grant Elliott (NZ)

Knockout stage[edit]

Semi-Finals[edit]

2 October 2009
14:30
Scorecard
England 
257 (47.4 overs)
v
 Australia
258/1 (41.5 overs)
Tim Bresnan 80 (76)
Peter Siddle 3/55 [10]
Shane Watson 136* (132)
Graham Onions 1/47 [8]
Australia won by 9 wickets
SuperSport Park, Centurion
Umpires: Aleem Dar (Pak) and Billy Bowden (NZ)
Player of the match: Shane Watson (Aus)

3 October 2009
14:30
Scorecard
Pakistan 
233/9 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
234/5 (47.5 overs)
Umar Akmal 55 (62)
Ian Butler 4/44 [10]
Grant Elliott 75* (103)
Saeed Ajmal 2/39 [8]
New Zealand won by 5 wickets
New Wanderers Stadium, Johannesburg
Umpires: Ian Gould (Eng) and Simon Taufel (Aus)
Player of the match: Daniel Vettori (NZ)

Final[edit]

5 October 2009
14:30
Scorecard
New Zealand 
200/9 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
206/4 (45.2 overs)
Martin Guptill 40 (64)
Nathan Hauritz 3/37 [10]
Shane Watson 105* (129)
Kyle Mills 3/27 [10]
Australia won by 6 wickets
SuperSport Park, Centurion
Umpires: Aleem Dar (Pak) and Ian Gould (Eng)
Player of the match: Shane Watson (Aus)

Stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Most runs[9]
Player Matches Runs Avg HS
Australia Ricky Ponting 5 288 72.00 111*
Australia Shane Watson 5 266 88.33 136*
South Africa Graeme Smith 3 206 68.66 141
England Paul Collingwood 4 202 50.50 82
Pakistan Mohammad Yousuf 4 200 50.00 87

Bowling[edit]

Most wickets[10]
Player Matches Wickets Econ BBI
South Africa Wayne Parnell 3 11 7.00 5/57
England Stuart Broad 3 10 5.50 4/39
New Zealand Kyle Mills 5 9 4.27 3/27
India Ashish Nehra 3 8 4.76 4/55
Pakistan Saeed Ajmal 4 8 3.79 2/16

Media coverage[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy Complete Schedule". CricketWorld4u. 19 Sep 2009. Archived from the original on 28 September 2009. Retrieved 17 March 2009. 
  2. ^ a b "S Africa to host Champions Trophy". BBC. 16 March 2009. Archived from the original on 7 March 2009. Retrieved 17 March 2009. 
  3. ^ ICC Decides Pakistan Will Host Champions Trophy, Cricket World, retrieved 24 July 2008
  4. ^ South Africa boycott cricket's Champions Trophy in Pakistan, Yahoo News, retrieved 22 August 2008
  5. ^ ICC Agrees To Postpone Champions Trophy, Cricket World, retrieved 24 August 2008
  6. ^ "Pakistan not to host 2009 Champions Trophy". Cricinfo. 1 February 2009. Archived from the original on 9 March 2009. Retrieved 17 March 2009. 
  7. ^ "South Africa set to host Champions Trophy". Cricinfo. 11 March 2009. Archived from the original on 12 March 2009. Retrieved 17 March 2009. 
  8. ^ "ICC board endorses South Africa to host Champions Trophy". Cricinfo. 16 March 2009. Archived from the original on 26 March 2009. Retrieved 17 March 2009. 
  9. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy, 2009/10 – Most runs". Cricinfo.com. ESPN. Retrieved 5 October 2009. 
  10. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy, 2009/10 – Most wickets". Cricinfo.com. ESPN. Archived from the original on 4 October 2009. Retrieved 5 October 2009. 

External links[edit]