2009 Paris–Roubaix

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2009 Paris–Roubaix
2009 UCI World Ranking, race 8 of 24
Boonen Roubaix 2009 2.jpg
Race details
Date April 12
Distance 259 km (160.9 mi)
Winning time 6h 15' 54" (41.3 km/h or 25.7 mph)
Palmares
Winner  Tom Boonen (Belgium) (Quick Step)
Second  Filippo Pozzato (Italy) (Team Katusha)
Third  Thor Hushovd (Norway) (Cervélo TestTeam)
2008
2010

The 2009 Paris–Roubaix was the 107th running of the Paris–Roubaix single-day cycling race, often known as the Hell of the North. It was held on 12 April 2009 over a distance of 259 kilometres (160.9 miles). The race was won by Tom Boonen, who won his third Paris–Roubaix (2005, 2008, 2009).[1] Boonen finished the race alone, seconds ahead of Filippo Pozzato. Thor Hushovd arrived third, to round out the podium. The race was the eighth event in the inaugural UCI World Ranking series.

Key Moments[edit]

Nearly all of the riders featured in the top ten endured at least a minor crash.

A group of eleven riders formed the early breakaway, but was caught again with still about 60 kilometres to go. Six riders then eventually broke away from the rest of the peloton: Tom Boonen, Juan Antonio Flecha, Leif Hoste, Thor Hushovd, Filippo Pozzato and Johan Van Summeren.

At Carrefour de l'arbre, about 15 kilometres from the finish, Flecha crashed and took Hoste with him in his fall. Van Summeren and Pozzato were held back which allowed Boonen and Hushovd to break away. However, just a few hundred metres further, Hushovd also crashed and Boonen continued on his own. Pozzato came to within 10 seconds but never managed to close the gap, allowing Boonen to win.[2]

During the race an official motorcycle crashed into the supporting crowd injuring sixteen people, four seriously. Three of the injured were flown by helicopter to hospitals in northern France.[3]

Results[edit]

Results (1–10)[4]
Cyclist Team Time
1  Tom Boonen (BEL) Quick Step 6h 15'54"
2  Filippo Pozzato (ITA) Team Katusha + 47"
3  Thor Hushovd (NOR) Cervélo TestTeam + 1'17"
4  Leif Hoste (BEL) Silence-Lotto + 1'17"
5  Johan Vansummeren (BEL) Silence-Lotto + 1'22"
6  Juan Antonio Flecha (ESP) Rabobank + 2'14"
7  Heinrich Haussler (GER) Cervélo TestTeam + 3'13"
8  Sylvain Chavanel (FRA) Quick Step + 3'15"
9  Manuel Quinziato (ITA) Liquigas + 5'00"
10  Matti Breschel (DEN) Team Saxo Bank + 5'29"

The cobblestones[edit]

Section Kilometers Place Length (km)
28 98 Troisvilles > Inchy 2.2
27 104.5 Viesly > Quiévy 1.8
26 107 Quiévy > Saint-Python 3.7
25 112 Saint-Python 1.5
24 119.5 Vertain > Saint-Martin-sur-Écaillon 1.9
23 126.5 Capelle-sur-Écaillon> Le-Bruat 1.7
22 138.5 Verchain-Maugré > Quérénaing 1.6
21 141.5 Quérénaing > Maing 2.5
20 144.5 Maing > Monchaux-sur-Écaillon 1.6
19 156 Haveluy > Wallers 2.5
18 164 Trouée d'Arenberg 2.5
17 170.5 Wallers > Hélesmes 1.6
16 177 Hornaing > Wandignies-Hamage 3.7
15 184.5 Warlaing > Brillon 2.4
14 188 Tilloy > Sars-et-Rosières 2.4
13 194.5 Beuvry-la-forêt > Orchies 1.4
12 199.5 Orchies 1.7
11 205.5 Auchy-lez-Orchies > Bersée 1.2
10 211 Mons-en-Pévèle 3
9 217 Mérignes > Pont-à-Marcq 0.7
8 220 Pont-Thibaut > Ennevelin 1.4
7 225.5 Templeuve > L'Épinette 0.2
7 226 Templeuve > Moulin-de-Vertain 0.5
6 232.5 Cysoing > Bourghelles 1.3
6 235 Bourghelles > Wannehain 1.1
5 239.5 Camphin-en-Pévèle 1.8
4 242.5 Carrefour de l'Arbre 2.1
3 244.5 Gruson 1.1
2 251.5 Hem 1.4
1 258 Roubaix 0.3

Pre-Race favorites[edit]

Favorites included 2008 winner Tom Boonen, teammate and Tour of Flanders winner Stijn Devolder, Garmin-Slipstream's Martijn Maaskant, and 2006 winner, Fabian Cancellara.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Other three time winners include Octave Lapize (1909, 1910, 1911), Gaston Rebry (1931, 1934, 1935), Rik Van Looy (1961, 1962, 1965), Eddy Merckx (1968, 1970, 1973), Francesco Moser (1978, 1979, 1980), Johan Museeuw (1996, 2000, 2002). The all-time winningest is four time winner Roger De Vlaeminck (1972, 1974, 1975, 1977)
  2. ^ "Boonen claims third Paris-Roubaix". BBC Sport. 2009-04-12. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  3. ^ "16 injured in motorcycle crash on Paris-Roubaix" (in eng). Reuters. 12 April 2009. Retrieved Apr 13, 2009. 
  4. ^ Laura Weislo and Brecht Decaluwé (2009-04-12). "Boonen's magical third!". Cyclingnews.com (Bath, UK: Future plc). Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  5. ^ "Racing to Hell: Roubaix's hit list". cyclingnews.com. Retrieved Apr 10, 2009. 

External links[edit]