2009 BWF World Championships

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2009 BWF World Championships
2009 BWF World Championships logo.jpg
Tournament details
Edition 17th
Level International
Venue Gachibowli Indoor Stadium
Location Hyderabad

The 2009 BWF World Championships was the 17th tournament of the BWF World Championships, a global tournament in the sport of badminton. It was held at the Gachibowli Indoor Stadium in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India, from August 10 to August 16, 2009.[1] It was the first ever World Championships event to take place in India.[2]

Badminton England withdrew before the first round due to a perceived threat of terror against the team. They were later joined by two Austrian doubles players. Lin Dan won the men's singles event, thus becoming the only player in badminton history to have won three men's singles world championship titles having done so consecutively in 2006, 2007, and 2009.[3] Lu Lan won the World Championship title in the women's singles event. Cai Yun and Fu Haifeng of China won the World Championship title in the men's doubles event in a match which was later dubbed a "classic". Zhang Yawen and Zhao Tingting won the World Championship title in the women's doubles event, whilst Thomas Laybourn and Kamilla Rytter Juhl of Denmark won the World Championship title in the mixed doubles event.

Venue[edit]

The 2009 BWF World Championships were held at the Gachibowli Indoor Stadium in Gachibowli, Hyderabad.

Draw[edit]

The draw took place on 22 July 2009, featuring Chief Guest and Indian Sports Minister, Dr. M.S. Gill.[2]

Participating nations[edit]

Austria[edit]

Due to security worries Austrian doubles pair Peter Zauner and Jürgen Koch decided against participation in the 2009 BWF World Championships.[4] The BWF issued a special statement calling the withdrawals "an individual decision on the part of the players". COO BWF Thomas Lund said: “I believe it is a matter of concern that teams haven’t been consulting us before pulling out, because all the necessary information is available with us which will allay fears”.[4] Lund declined to blame the Indian media for their part in the withdrawals: “I can’t say India as hosts have any reason to be blamed for a false newspaper report with threat perceptions which triggered these reactions.”[4]

Denmark[edit]

Denmark, who had not achieved a BWF World Championship singles win since 1999, and a men’s title since 1997, took part.[5] The country last won the men's doubles title in 2003.[5]

England[edit]

The English badminton team decided against participation in the 2009 BWF World Championships, citing fears of a "terrorist threat", although, according to Hyderabad's police commission "there's no real threat, only a perception".[6] Badminton England chief executive Adrian Christy called it "an incredibly tough decision and one we didn't take lightly".[6] Christy said: "We were not prepared to risk the safety of our players, coaches and staff in what we felt could have been a very volatile environment".[6]

Medalists[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's singles China Lin Dan China Chen Jin Indonesia Taufik Hidayat
Indonesia Sony Dwi Kuncoro
Women's singles China Lu Lan China Xie Xingfang China Wang Lin
France Pi Hongyan
Men's doubles China Fu Haifeng
China Cai Yun
South Korea Jung Jae-sung
South Korea Lee Yong-dae
Malaysia Mohd Zakry Abdul Latif
Malaysia Mohd Fairuzizuan Mohd Tazari
Malaysia Koo Kien Keat
Malaysia Tan Boon Heong
Women's doubles China Zhang Yawen
China Zhao Tingting
China Cheng Shu
China Zhao Yunlei
China Du Jing
China Yu Yang
China Ma Jin
China Wang Xiaoli
Mixed doubles Denmark Thomas Laybourn
Denmark Kamilla Rytter Juhl
Indonesia Nova Widianto
Indonesia Lilyana Natsir
South Korea Lee Yong-dae
South Korea Lee Hyo-jung
Denmark Joachim Fischer Nielsen
Denmark Christinna Pedersen

Men's singles[edit]

Lin Dan of China won the World Championship title in the men's singles event, beating Chen Jin in the final.[7] The score was 21–16.[7] The victory, Dan's third consecutive one (4 counting the unofficial World Championship, the Olympic Games in Beijing in 2008), set a new record for consecutive victories.[7] Despite the three consecutive victories, Dan was not ranked number one player in the world at the time of his third victory.[7]

Seeds[edit]

  1. Malaysia Lee Chong Wei (Quarter Final)
  2. China Chen Jin (Final)
  3. Denmark Peter Gade (Quarter Final)
  4. Indonesia Taufik Hidayat (Semi Final)
  5. China Lin Dan (Champion)
  6. Indonesia Sony Dwi Kuncoro (Semi Final)
  7. Denmark Joachim Persson (First Round)
  8. South Korea Park Sung-hwan (Second Round)
  9. Chinese Taipei Hsieh Yu-hsing (Third Round)
  10. Hong Kong Chan Yan Kit (Third Round)
  11. China Bao Chunlai (First Round)
  12. Malaysia Wong Choong Hann (First Round)
  13. Indonesia Simon Santoso (Quarter Final)
  14. Vietnam Nguyen Tien Minh (Third Round)
  15. India Chetan Anand (Third Round)
  16. Thailand Boonsak Ponsana (Third Round)

Results[edit]

  Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
                                       
  1  Malaysia Lee Chong Wei 16 21 12  
6  Indonesia Sony Dwi Kuncoro 21 14 21  
  6  Indonesia Sony Dwi Kuncoro 14 21 15  
  5  China Lin Dan 21 13 21  
3  Denmark Peter Gade 20 16
  5  China Lin Dan 22 21  
    5  China Lin Dan 21 21
  2  China Chen Jin 18 16
     Denmark Jan Ø. Jørgensen 19 19  
4  Indonesia Taufik Hidayat 21 21  
  4  Indonesia Taufik Hidayat 16 6
  2  China Chen Jin 21 21  
13  Indonesia Simon Santoso 10 13
  2  China Chen Jin 21 21  

Women's singles[edit]

Lu Lan won the World Championship title in the women's singles event, beating Xie Xingfang in the final.[8] Lu won by a score of 23–21.[8] Xie had at one point reached game point when the score was at 21–20.[8] Lu won in two games by scores of 23–21 and 21–12.[8]

Seeds[edit]

  1. Hong Kong Zhou Mi (Quarter Final)
  2. China Wang Lin (Semi Final)
  3. Denmark Tine Rasmussen (Quarter Final)
  4. China Wang Yihan (Third Round)
  5. China Xie Xingfang (Final)
  6. India Saina Nehwal (Quarter Final)
  7. China Lu Lan (Champion)
  8. France Pi Hongyan (Semi Final)
  9. Hong Kong Wang Chen (Third Round)
  10. Bulgaria Petya Nedelcheva (Third Round)
  11. Germany Juliane Schenk (Quarter Final)
  12. South Korea Hwang Hye-youn (Third Round)
  13. Hong Kong Yip Pui Yin (Third Round)
  14. Malaysia Wong Mew Choo (Second Round)
  15. Indonesia Maria Kristin Yulianti (Third Round)
  16. Netherlands Judith Meulendijks (Second Round)

Results[edit]

  First Round Second Round Third Round
                                       
  1  Hong Kong Zhou Mi 15 18  
5  China Xie Xingfang 21 21  
  5  China Xie Xingfang 21 21  
  8  France Pi Hongyan 18 8  
11  Germany Juliane Schenk 21 15 19
  8  France Pi Hongyan 15 21 21  
    5  China Xie Xingfang 21 12
  7  China Lu Lan 23 21
  7  China Lu Lan 21 21  
3  Denmark Tine Rasmussen 15 13  
  7  China Lu Lan 21 21
  2  China Wang Lin 18 19  
6  India Saina Nehwal 16 19
  2  China Wang Lin 21 21  

Men's doubles[edit]

Cai Yun and Fu Haifeng of China won the World Championship title in the men's doubles event, the final of the World Championships, beating Lee Yong-dae and Jung Jae-sung of Korea in the final.[9] It was their second men's doubles title, having previously won in Madrid in 2006.[9] Cai Yun and Fu Haifeng won the first game by a score of 21–18. The Koreans then won the second game by a score of 16–21 to draw level.[9] The third game saw the two pairs exchange the lead several times with a one point difference before exchanging several match points.[9] 28–26 was the final score, with the Chinese declared winners on their sixth match point.[9] Retired Chinese badminton player and now coach of his national team, Li Yongbo, watched from the sidelines what was later termed "a classic that will be often recalled as one of the best men’s doubles matches in the recent history of the sport".[9]

Seeds[edit]

Results[edit]

  Quarter Finals Semi Finals Final
                                       
     South Korea Cho Gun-woo
 South Korea Yoo Yeon-seong
21 12 14  
8  Malaysia Zakry Abdul Latif
 Malaysia Fairuzizuan Tazari
17 21 21  
  8  Malaysia Zakry Abdul Latif
 Malaysia Fairuzizuan Tazari
21 22 15  
  5  China Cai Yun
 China Fu Haifeng
18 24 21  
   South Korea Han Sang-hoon
 South Korea Shin Baek-cheol
16 18
  5  China Cai Yun
 China Fu Haifeng
21 21  
    5  China Cai Yun
 China Fu Haifeng
21 16 28
  4  South Korea Jung Jae-sung
 South Korea Lee Yong-dae
18 21 26
     China Xu Chen
 China Guo Zhendong
17 26  
4  South Korea Jung Jae-sung
 South Korea Lee Yong-dae
21 28  
  4  South Korea Jung Jae-sung
 South Korea Lee Yong-dae
16 21 22
  2  Malaysia Koo Kien Keat
 Malaysia Tan Boon Heong
21 14 20  
   United States Howard Bach
 United States Tony Gunawan
20 21 17
  2  Malaysia Koo Kien Keat
 Malaysia Tan Boon Heong
22 13 21  

Women's doubles[edit]

Zhang Yawen and Zhao Tingting won the World Championship title in the women's doubles event, beating Cheng Shu and Zhao Yunlei in the final.[10] They did so with some difficulty, including three games with scores of 17–21, 21–17 and 21–16, and battled delaying tactics employed by their rivals.[10] The match also featured several lengthy rallies which consisted of over thirty shots.[10] On the winners' podium to receive their medals, the winners cried as it was their first ever victory in the women's doubles event.[10]

Seeds[edit]

  1. Malaysia Chin Eei Hui / Wong Pei Tty (Third Round)
  2. China Cheng Shu / Zhao Yunlei (Final)
  3. South Korea Lee Hyo-jung / Lee Kyung-won (Quarter Final)
  4. South Korea Ha Jung-eun / Kim Min-jung (Quarter Final)
  5. China Du Jing / Yu Yang (Semi Final)
  6. China Ma Jin / Wang Xiaoli (Semi Final)
  7. Chinese Taipei Cheng Wen-hsing / Chien Yu-chin (Quarter Final)
  8. China Zhang Yawen / Zhao Tingting (Champion)
  9. Denmark Lena Frier Kristiansen / Kamilla Rytter Juhl (Third Round)
  10. Indonesia Shendy Puspa Irawati / Meiliana Jauhari (Third Round)
  11. Japan Miyuki Maeda / Satoko Suetsuna (Quarter Final)
  12. Denmark Helle Nielsen / Marie Røpke (Third Round)
  13. Indonesia Greysia Polii / Nitya Krishinda Maheswari (Third Round)
  14. Russia Valeria Sorokina / Nina Vislova (Withdrew)
  15. Singapore Shinta Mulia Sari / Yao Lei (Third Round)
  16. Japan Mizuki Fujii / Reika Kakiiwa (Third Round)

Results[edit]

  Quarter Finals Semi Finals Final
                                       
  11  Japan Miyuki Maeda
 Japan Satoko Suetsuna
17 8  
5  China Du Jing
 China Yu Yang
21 21  
  5  China Du Jing
 China Yu Yang
22 21 8  
  8  China Zhang Yawen
 China Zhao Tingting
24 18 21  
4  South Korea Ha Jung-eun
 South Korea Kim Min-jung
9 10
  8  China Zhang Yawen
 China Zhao Tingting
21 21  
    8  China Zhang Yawen
 China Zhao Tingting
17 21 21
  2  China Cheng Shu
 China Zhao Yunlei
21 17 16
  6  China Ma Jin
 China Wang Xiaoli
21 21  
3  South Korea Lee Hyo-jung
 South Korea Lee Kyung-won
18 13  
  6  China Ma Jin
 China Wang Xiaoli
16 12
  2  China Cheng Shu
 China Zhao Yunlei
21 21  
7  Chinese Taipei Cheng Wen-hsing
 Chinese Taipei Chien Yu-chin
21 11 8
  2  China Cheng Shu
 China Zhao Yunlei
11 21 21  

Mixed doubles[edit]

Thomas Laybourn and Kamilla Rytter Juhl of Denmark won the World Championship title in the mixed doubles event, beating Lilyana Natsir and Nova Widianto of Indonesia (the defending champions) in the final.[11] It was their first ever world title.[11] The duo beat Zheng Bo and Ma Jin of China and Korea's Olympic champions on the way to the final.[11] In the final, the Danish doubles pair won the first game by a score of 21–13 and also eased through the second game at a score of 21–17.[11]

Seeds[edit]

Results[edit]

  Quarter Finals Semi Finals Final
                                       
  1  South Korea Lee Yong-dae
 South Korea Lee Hyo-jung
21 21  
5  China Xie Zhongbo
 China Zhang Yawen
16 16  
  1  South Korea Lee Yong-dae
 South Korea Lee Hyo-jung
21 9 18  
  7  Denmark Thomas Laybourn
 Denmark Kamilla Rytter Juhl
18 21 21  
3  China Zheng Bo
 China Ma Jin
20 21 20
  7  Denmark Thomas Laybourn
 Denmark Kamilla Rytter Juhl
22 11 22  
    7  Denmark Thomas Laybourn
 Denmark Kamilla Rytter Juhl
21 21
  2  Indonesia Nova Widianto
 Indonesia Lilyana Natsir
13 17
  6  Denmark Joachim Fischer Nielsen
 Denmark Christinna Pedersen
21 21  
4  China He Hanbin
 China Yu Yang
10 17  
  6  Denmark Joachim Fischer Nielsen
 Denmark Christinna Pedersen
18 21 18
  2  Indonesia Nova Widianto
 Indonesia Lilyana Natsir
21 14 21  
8  India Valiyaveetil Diju
 India Jwala Gutta
16 14
  2  Indonesia Nova Widianto
 Indonesia Lilyana Natsir
21 21  

Medal account[edit]

Pos Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  China 4 3 3 10
2  Denmark 1 0 1 2
3  Indonesia 0 1 2 3
4  South Korea 0 1 1 2
5  Malaysia 0 0 2 2
6  France 0 0 1 1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]