2009 flu pandemic in Turkey

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Main article: 2009 flu pandemic
Further information: 2009 flu pandemic by country
2009 flu pandemic in Turkey
H1N1 Turkey Map.svg
Outbreak evolution Turkey:
  Confirmed deaths
  Confirmed cases
Disease Swine flu
Virus strain H1N1
Arrival date 16 May 2009[1]
Origin Central Mexico[2]
Deaths 627[3]
Confirmed cases 12,316[3]

The 2009 flu pandemic was a global outbreak of a new strain of influenza A virus subtype H1N1, first identified in April 2009, termed Pandemic H1N1/09 virus by the World Health Organization (WHO)[4] and colloquially called swine flu. The outbreak was first observed in Mexico,[2][5] and quickly spread globally. On 11 June 2009, WHO declared the outbreak to be a pandemic.[6][7] The overwhelming majority of patients experience mild symptoms",[6] but some persons are in higher risk groups, such as those with asthma, diabetes,[8][9] obesity, heart disease, or who are pregnant or have a weakened immune system.[10] In the rare severe cases, around 3–5 days after symptoms manifest, the sufferer's condition declines quickly, often to the point respiratory failure.[11]

Turkish H1N1 control

The virus reached Turkey in May 2009. A U.S. citizen, flying from the United States via Amsterdam was found to be suffering from the swine flu after arriving at Istanbul's Atatürk International Airport.[12] Turkey is the 17th country in Europe and the 36th country in the world to report an incident of swine flu.

The Turkish Government has taken measures at the international airports, using thermal imaging cameras to check passengers coming from international destinations.[13]

The first case of person to person transmission within Turkey was announced on 26 July 2009.

On 2 November, the Turkish Health Ministry began administering vaccines against H1N1 influenza, starting with health workers.[14]

After a slow start, the virus spread rapidly in Turkey and the number of cases reached 12,316.[3] First death confirmed on 24 October and death toll reached 627.[3]

Timeline[edit]

2009–2010 Milestones of the flu pandemic in Turkey
16 May First case in Turkey confirmed in Istanbul.
26 July First case of a person to person transmission confirmed.
24 October First death in Turkey confirmed in Ankara.
29 October First death confirmed in Diyarbakır, second overall.
First death confirmed in Konya, third overall.
1 November Second death confirmed in Ankara, fourth overall.
Second death confirmed in Konya, fifth overall.
Third death confirmed in Konya, sixth overall.
2 November Mass vaccinations began.
First death confirmed in Şanlıurfa, seventh overall.
First death confirmed in Istanbul, eighth overall.
Third death confirmed in Ankara, ninth overall.
3 November First death confirmed in Kayseri, tenth overall.
Eleventh death of Turkey confirmed.
4 November Three people died in various cities.
First death confirmed in Batman, fifteenth overall.
5 November Four people died in various cities.
6 November Two people died in various cities.
7 November Two people died in various cities.
8 November Four people died in various cities.
9 November Three people died in various cities.
10 November Six people died in various cities.
11 November Four people died in various cities.
12–13 November Twenty people died in various cities.
14–16 November Thirteen people died in various cities.
17–19 November Twenty people died in various cities.
20–23 November Twenty people died in various cities.
24–26 November Forty-eight people died in various cities.
25–30 November Thirty-four people died in various cities.
1–3 December Forty-six people died in various cities.
4–7 December Fifty-five people died in various cities.
8–10 December Fifty-seven people died in various cities.
11–14 December Sixty-two people died in various cities.
15–22 December Forty-three people died in various cities.
23–29 December Forty-nine people died in various cities.
30 December–19 January One hundred and twenty people died in various cities.

See also[edit]

  • GISAID the Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data (also covers novel A/H1N1 swine flu)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Swine flu arrives in Turkey: 6 tourists in quarantine". eturbonews.com. 2009-05-17. Retrieved 2009-10-31. 
  2. ^ a b Mcneil, Donald G. (April 27, 2009). "Flu Outbreak Raises a Set of Questions". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Son durum: 12 bin 316 vaka, 458 ölüm". ntvmsnbc. 2009-12-22. Retrieved 2009-12-23.  (Turkish)
  4. ^ http://www.who.int/mediacentre/Pandemic_h1n1_presstranscript_2009_07_07.pdf
  5. ^ Maria Zampaglione (April 29, 2009). "Press Release: A/H1N1 influenza like human illness in Mexico and the USA: OIE statement". World Organisation for Animal Health. Archived from the original on 30 April 2009. Retrieved April 29, 2009. 
  6. ^ a b Chan, Dr. Margaret (2009-06-11). "World now at the start of 2009 influenza pandemic". World Health Organization. Archived from the original on 22 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-25. 
  7. ^ "UK National Institute for Medical Research WHO World Influenza Centre: Emergence and spread of a new influenza A (H1N1) virus, 12 June 09". Archived from the original on 2009-09-10. Retrieved 2009-09-02. 
  8. ^ "Diabetes and the Flu". U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Archived from the original on 25 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-25. 
  9. ^ National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Diabetes Translation (2009-10-14). "CDC's Diabetes Program - News & Information - H1N1 Flu". CDC.gov. CDC. Archived from the original on 23 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-25. 
  10. ^ Hartocollis, Anemona (2009-05-27). "'Underlying conditions' may add to flu worries". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 30 August 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-26. 
  11. ^ "Clinical features of severe cases of pandemic influenza". Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization. 2009-10-16. Archived from the original on 25 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-25. 
  12. ^ "First case of swine flu confirmed in Turkey". turkishny.com. 2009-05-16. Archived from the original on 19 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-13. [dead link]
  13. ^ "Alarmed by swine flu, Turkey takes immediate action". Todayszaman.com. 2009-04-28. Archived from the original on 2009-09-09. Retrieved 2009-05-20. 
  14. ^ "Turkey starts vaccinations against killer swine flu". Todayszaman.com. 2009-11-02. Archived from the original on 19 November 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-26. 
  15. ^ Turkish Health Ministry

External links[edit]

Official status reports
Background information