200s BC (decade)

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 4th century BC3rd century BC2nd century BC
Decades: 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC200s BC190s BC 180s BC 170s BC
Years: 209 BC 208 BC 207 BC 206 BC 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC 202 BC 201 BC 200 BC
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EstablishmentsDisestablishments

200s BC: events by year[edit]

Contents: 209 BC 208 BC 207 BC 206 BC 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC 202 BC 201 BC 200 BC

209 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • As strategos of the Achaeans, the Greek general Philopoemen is responsible for turning the Achaean League into an aggressive military power. He builds up the League's military capability. The Achaean League's army and cavalry under Philopoemen then defeat the Aetolians on the Elean frontier.

Mongols[edit]

208 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

China[edit]

207 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • The general leading the Achaean League, Philopoemen, introduces heavier Macedonian armour and phalanx tactics. His army then crushes the Spartans under the Spartan regent and general, Machanidas, in the battle of Mantinea. Machanidas is killed by Philopoemen during the battle.
  • Nabis, a Syrian sold into slavery, rises to power in Sparta and becomes regent of the young Spartan king, Pelops, following the death of Machanidas. Nabis soon overthrows Pelops, claiming to be a descendent of the Eurypontid Spartan king Demaratus. Nabis then starts a social revolution which will lead to the freeing of all the helots, the destruction of the ruling oligarchy, the redistribution of land and the cancelling of debts.

Vietnam[edit]

China[edit]

206 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Carthage[edit]

  • Hasdrubal Gisco retreats to the coast and then crosses to North Africa, where he gives his daughter in marriage to Syphax, king of the Numidian Masaesyli tribe, to formalize their military alliance.
  • After being an ally of Carthage and fighting with them, Numidian chieftain, Masinissa switches sides when the Carthaginians are driven from Spain and offers to assist Rome. Syphax expels his rival Masinissa and claims himself to be King of Numidia. The Romans support Masinissa's claim to the Numidian throne against Syphax, the pro-Carthaginian ruler of the Masaesyli tribe.

Persia[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • The war between Macedonia and Rome drags on with no decided advantage to either side. Rome's interest lies not in conquest, but in keeping Macedon, the Greek city-states and Greek political leagues continually divided and non-threatening.
  • Philip V of Macedon is able to take advantage of Roman inactivity. After sacking Thermum, the religious and political centre of Aetolia, Philip is able to force the Aetolians to accept a peace treaty based on his terms.

China[edit]

  • Ziying, ruler of the Qin Dynasty, surrenders to Liu Bang, leader of a popular revolt. This marks the end of the Qin Dynasty and the principality that would later become the Han Dynasty established by Liu. However, in order to secure his position throughout China, Liu Bang becomes engaged in a civil war with the warlord, General Xiang Yu, until 202 BC, known as the Chu-Han contention.

205 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • The native Egyptian population rises in rebellion against their Greek rulers. The revolt spreads to Upper Egypt.
  • Ptolemy IV dies and is succeeded by his five year old son Ptolemy V. However, no public announcement is made about the king's death.

204 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Carthage[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • The late Egyptian King Ptolemy IV's clique of favourites, led by Sosibius, Ptolemy's chief minister, keeps Ptolemy's death a secret, fearing retribution from the new king Ptolemy V's mother, Queen Arsinoe III. They arrange for the murder of Arsinoe, and then the five-year-old king is officially elevated to the throne with Sosibius as his guardian. Arsinoe has been popular with the Egyptian population so rioting follows the news of her assassination.

Roman Republic[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

203 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Carthage[edit]

  • The Roman general, Publius Cornelius Scipio, while undertaking peace negotiations with the Carthaginians at Utica, makes a surprise attack on the Carthaginian camp and destroys it. Then, sweeping down on the forces that the Carthaginians and their allies, the Numidians, are trying to muster on the Great Plains near the upper Bagradas River (in modern Tunisia), he smashes that army in the Battle of the Great Plains. The Numidian king, Syphax, and the Carthaginian leader, Hasdrubal Gisco, manage to escape separately.
  • The Roman general, Gaius Laelius, and Rome's Numidian ally, Masinissa, follow Syphax towards Cirta, the Numidian capital. In the pursuit, Syphax is captured after his badly wounded horse throws him off. He is delivered to Scipio and is made a prisoner of the Romans, dying in the Italian town of Alba Fucens later in the year.
  • Masinissa becomes king of both the Massyli and the Massaesyli tribes in Numidia and remains a loyal ally to the Romans.
  • Hasdrubal Gisco persuades the Carthaginians to raise a new army and to send for Hannibal to return home from Italy. Hannibal finally leaves Italy and returns to Carthage.
  • The Carthaginian general, Mago Barca, is defeated and wounded by the Romans in a battle in Cisalpine Gaul. He dies of his wounds on the return voyage to Carthage.
  • A preliminary armistice between Carthage and Rome is declared and the Carthaginian armies accept Scipio's severe terms. However, on his return to Carthage, Hannibal concentrates the remnants of the Carthaginian forces at Hadrumetum (modern Sousse, Tunisia) and prepares them for battle.

202 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Carthage[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • The Egyptian regent and chief minister, Sosibius, retires and Agathocles, another member of the ruling clique, becomes Ptolemy V's guardian.
  • Agathocles rule provokes Tlepolemus, the governor of Pelusium (Egypt's eastern frontier city), into action. Tlepolemus marches on Alexandria, where his supporters rouse a mob, compelling Agathocles to resign.
  • The Egyptian boy king, Ptolemy V, is encouraged by a mob clamouring for revenge against the murderers of his mother Arsinoe III to agree to Agathocles being killed. As a result, the mob searches out and butchers Agathocles and his family. Tlepolemus takes Agathocles’ place as regent. However, he soon proves to be incompetent and is removed.
  • During this period of confusion and change amongst Egypt’s leadership, armies under the Seleucid king, Antiochus III, make serious inroads into the Egyptian territories in Coele Syria.

China[edit]

201 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Carthage[edit]

  • On Hannibal's advice, Carthage sues for peace with the Romans, ending the Second Punic War. Carthage is reduced to a client state of Rome. In the peace treaty between Carthage and Rome, Carthage surrenders all her Mediterranean possessions to Rome, including her Iberian territories. The Carthaginians agree to pay Rome 200 talents per year for 50 years, allow Masinissa to rule Numidia as an independent kingdom, make no war without Rome's permission, and destroy all but 10 of the Carthaginian warships.
  • Following the conclusion of the peace with Rome, Hannibal is elected as suffet, or chief magistrate, of Carthage. The office has over the years become insignificant in Carthaginian politics, but Hannibal restores its power and authority. He sets out to reform the administration and finances of Carthage and reduce the power of the oligarchy which has ruled Carthage before and during the Second Punic War.

Roman Republic[edit]

  • The Romans oust the Carthaginians from Malta.
  • In Rome, according to the Roman historian Livy, land is distributed to veterans of the Second Punic War. This is the first documented instance of a practice that later becomes commonplace.

Greece[edit]

China[edit]

200 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Bactria[edit]

South America[edit]

China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]

Astronomy[edit]

  • The first good measurement of the distance between Earth and the Sun is made by Eratosthenes (approximate date). By studying lunar eclipses, his result is roughly 150 000 000 km. The currently accepted value is 149 597 870 691 ± 30 metres.


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]