2010–11 Top 14 season

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2010–11 Top 14 season
Top 14 Logo.png
Countries  France
Champions Toulouse
Runners-up Montpellier
Relegated La Rochelle
Bourgoin
Matches played 187
Attendance 2,827,343 (average 15,119 per match)
Tries scored 692 (average 3.701 per match)
Top point scorer France Jonathan Wisniewski (336)
Top try scorer France Maxime Médard (15)

The 2010–11 Top 14 competition was a French domestic rugby union club competition operated by the Ligue Nationale de Rugby (LNR). Home-and-away play began on August 13, 2010 and continued through April 2011. The regular season was followed by a three-round playoff starting in May that involved the top six teams, culminating in the final on June 4 at Stade de France. Toulouse won the Bouclier de Brennus for the 18th time, defeating Montpellier 15–10.

Season synopsis[edit]

This year's edition of the Top 14 welcomed Agen, winners of the 2010 title in the second-level Pro D2 and returning to the top flight three years after being relegated, and La Rochelle, victors in the 2009 promotion playoffs between the second- through fifth-placed teams. They took the place of Montauban and Albi, relegated at the end of the 2009–10 Top 14.

Of the two promoted teams, Agen survived, while La Rochelle were tentatively relegated after finishing second-from-bottom. The other relegated side were Bourgoin, which had barely avoided bankruptcy in the previous season. Their financial struggles continued, and they were docked 5 points for their financial issues. The deduction was ultimately immaterial, as even without it they would have finished more than 20 points adrift of 13th-place La Rochelle.

There was, however, a chance that La Rochelle would be spared the drop. During the season, Stade Français faced major financial issues, temporarily avoiding an administrative relegation in early June 2011 when president Max Guazzini announced a deal in which a Canadian foundation, working with former France national coach Bernard Laporte and an unnamed investor, would purchase a minority stake in the club.[1] However, the planned infusion of €12 million did not materialize; Guazzini and Laporte sued the foundation, and three people had been arrested in connection with the deal as of June 24. On June 27, Guazzini met with the LNR's financial watchdog, DNACG, to discuss the club's situation. Reports indicated that if the club did not find €6.6 million by the time of the meeting, Stade would file for bankruptcy, which would result in an automatic relegation to the nominally amateur Fédérale 1. The French government had announced it would not bail out the club.[2] The meeting ended with the announcement of a new deal by which Guazzini would sell a controlling stake in the club to a group of investors led by French technology executive Jean-Pierre Savare, keeping Stade in the Top 14 and confirming La Rochelle's relegation. As part of the deal, Guazzini stepped aside as club president in favor of Savare's son Thomas.[3][4]

The season saw signs of a changing of the guard in French rugby, especially in Paris. Racing Métro reasserted itself as a national power, finishing second on the season table. Bayonne went from being reprieved from relegation to playoff contenders, ultimately missing out in the final week of the season. Montpellier went from fighting for survival through much of 2009–10 to finalists this season, winning their quarterfinal and semifinal matches away by 1 point each, and leading Toulouse for most of the final before falling short. In the end, traditional power Toulouse lifted the Bouclier de Brennus.

Previous season[edit]

The 2009–10 season saw Clermont, in their 100th season, end decades of frustration by defeating Perpignan in the final to claim their first title, having lost in all 10 of their previous final appearances. At the other end of the table, Albi, which had been promoted to the Top 14 for 2009–10, finished bottom of the table and went down. Bayonne finished second-to-bottom but avoided relegation when it was revealed that 12th-placed Montauban were filing for bankruptcy[5] and would therefore be automatically relegated. The other newly promoted team in 2009–10, Racing Métro, enjoyed a very successful season, finishing sixth, and qualified to the quarter-finals where they narrowly lost to eventual champions Clermont.

Competition format[edit]

Each club played every other club twice. The second half of the season was conducted in the same order as the first, with the club at home in the first half of the season away in the second. This season maintained the format introduced the previous season for the knockout stage: the top two teams qualified directly to the semifinals, while teams ranked from third to sixth qualified for a quarterfinal held at the home ground of the higher-ranked team. Semifinals are traditionally held at neutral sites; this season, both were held at Stade Vélodrome in Marseille. The final was held at Stade de France.

Going into the season, the top six clubs are guaranteed of berths in the following season's Heineken Cup.[6][7] The winners of the 2010–11 Heineken Cup and European Challenge Cup are assured of berths in the 2011–12 Heineken Cup regardless of their league standing, as long as they avoid relegation. This means that if a club finishes in the top six and wins one of the European competitions, the seventh-place team will gain a Heineken Cup berth. However, if French clubs win both competitions, only five clubs will qualify for the 2011–12 Heineken Cup via their league position because France is capped at seven Heineken Cup places. France can also secure a seventh berth if clubs from England's Aviva Premiership, also capped at seven Heineken Cup places, win both Cup competitions, and the top club in the European Rugby Club Rankings among those not already qualified for the Heineken Cup is from the Top 14. Note, however, that if a winner of one of the European cups is relegated in the same season, LNR will not nominate it for European competition; its place will be taken by a current Top 14 side based on league position.[7]

The bottom two teams are provisionally relegated to Pro D2, with the possibility of one or both of the bottom teams to be reprieved if a team above them fails a postseason financial audit (mandatory for all clubs in the league).

The LNR uses a slightly different bonus points system from that used in most other rugby competitions. It trialled a new system in 2007–08 explicitly designed to prevent a losing team from earning more than one bonus point in a match,[8] a system that also made it impossible for either team to earn a bonus point in a drawn match. The LNR chose to continue with this system for subsequent seasons.[9]

France's bonus point system operates as follows:[9]

  • 4 points for a win.
  • 2 points for a draw.
  • 1 "bonus" point for winning while scoring at least 3 more tries than the opponent. This replaces the standard bonus point for scoring 4 tries regardless of the match result.
  • 1 "bonus" point for losing by 7 points (or less).

New developments[edit]

Salary cap[edit]

This season was the first in French rugby history to have a fixed salary cap. Previously, the only restrictions on team salaries were that wage bills were limited to 50% of turnover[10] and that 10% of the salary budget had to be held in reserve.[11] In December 2009, LNR announced that team payrolls would be limited to €8 million in 2010–11, and that the reserve requirement would be increased to 20%.[11] The previous limitation of 50% of turnover remained in effect.[10] However, rugby journalist Ian Moriarty dismissed the cap as "little more than a bit of sleight of hand by the LNR to appease a sporting public", noting that the announced cap was 5% greater than the highest official wage bill in the 2009–10 Top 14, and translated to £7.1 million at the time of announcement, well above the then-current £4 million cap in the English Premiership. Moriarty also added that clubs would likely find ways around the cap, noting, "Last season [2008–09], it's rumoured that one big, overseas name was paid less than 40% of his total income as a salary."[10]

Domestic player rules[edit]

LNR also announced new rules requiring a minimum percentage of French players on team rosters. Under the new policy, "French players" are defined as those meeting the following criteria:[11]

  • Players 21 or over must have been registered with the French Rugby Federation (FFR) for at least five years before having turned 21.
  • Players currently under 21 must have spent at least three seasons in an FFR-approved training centre.

The required percentage of French players was 40% this season, and will increase to 50% in 2011–12 and 60% in 2012–13.[11]

Tax issues[edit]

A change in French tax law that took effect on 1 July 2010 raised concerns about the financial future of smaller clubs. The root of this issue is a French law known as DIC (Droit à l'Image Collectif), passed in 2004, that had allowed all French professional sports clubs to treat 30% of each player's salary as image rights. This portion of the salary was thus exempt from France's high employment and social insurance taxes, allowing French clubs to compete on a more equal financial footing with those in other European countries. However, the government announced in 2009 that it would suspend DIC.[12]

The policy change was publicly criticized by wealthy club owners. Mourad Boudjellal of Toulon, who claimed that the change in the law would cost him more than €1 million in 2010–11, and Paul Goze of Perpignan took to the pitch before one of their matches to participate in a protest. Max Guazzini of Stade Français complained that the end of DIC would cost him about €800,000. However, the real concern in French rugby circles was for the potential blow to smaller clubs. Bourgoin, who only avoided a bankruptcy filing in 2009 by players agreeing to large wage cuts, faced an effective increase of €400,000 in their 2010–11 expenses. Brive had already announced that they would slash their budget by 40% for the 2010–11 season, but with a 2009–10 wage bill of €7.2 million and several high-profile players locked into long-term contracts, the increased tax bill was speculated to be a serious problem for the club.[12]

Financial troubles at Bourgoin[edit]

Bourgoin's financial struggles became a major issue during the early summer of 2010. The club had been called in for a financial review by LNR's financial watchdog DNACG late in the 2009–10 season, which they survived with no action taken at that time.[13] However, after the fixture list for the 2010–11 season was released, DNACG denied Bourgoin a professional license.[14] Bourgoin appealed this ruling, and also considered pursuing legal action against LNR.[14] Had Bourgoin been unsuccessful in their bid to stave off relegation, the choice of the team to replace them would not have been straightforward, as the most logical choice, Albi, who had been relegated after finishing at the bottom of the 2009–10 table, were facing their own financial problems and may not have had the resources for a Top 14 campaign.[15] However, the FFR officially rescinded the DNACG's ruling on July 9, allowing Bourgoin to stay in the Top 14, thus also confirming Albi's place in Pro D2.[16]

The teams[edit]

Team Captain Head coach Stadium Capacity
Agen South Africa Adri Badenhorst France Christophe Deylaud
France Christian Lanta
Stade Armandie 14,600
Bayonne France Pépito Elhorga France Christian Gajan Stade Jean-Dauger 16,934
Biarritz France Imanol Harinordoquy Australia Jack Isaac and
France Jean-Michel Gonzalez
Parc des Sports Aguiléra 15,000
Bourgoin France Julien Frier France Éric Catinot Stade Pierre-Rajon 9,441
Brive South Africa Antonie Claassen France Ugo Mola Stade Amédée-Domenech 15,000
Castres France Alexandre Albouy
France Sébastien Tillous-Borde
France Laurent Labit and
France Laurent Travers
Stade Pierre-Antoine 11,500
Clermont France Aurélien Rougerie New Zealand Vern Cotter Parc des Sports Marcel-Michelin 16,334
Montpellier France Fulgence Ouedraogo France Fabien Galthié Stade Yves-du-Manoir 15,000
Perpignan France Nicolas Mas France Jacques Brunel Stade Aimé-Giral 16,593
Racing Métro France Lionel Nallet France Pierre Berbizier Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir 14,000
La Rochelle Germany Robert Mohr France Serge Milhas Stade Marcel-Deflandre 12,500
Stade Français Italy Sergio Parisse Australia Michael Cheika Stade Charléty 20,000
Stade de France 80,000
Toulon South Africa Joe van Niekerk France Philippe Saint-André Stade Mayol 13,700
Toulouse France Thierry Dusautoir France Guy Novès Stade Ernest-Wallon 19,500
Stadium Municipal 35,472

Note: Stade Francais have moved their home matches from their traditional home of Stade Jean-Bouin while a new 20,000-seat stadium is built on the site. The new Jean-Bouin is scheduled to open in 2013–14.[17]

Table[edit]

Key to colors
     League champions; receive a place in the 2011–12 Heineken Cup.
     Top two teams qualify directly to semifinals and receive places in the 2011–12 Heineken Cup.
     Third and fourth placed teams play their quarterfinal at home and also receive automatic Heineken Cup berths.
     Fifth and sixth placed teams play their quarterfinal away and also receive automatic Heineken Cup berths (but see note 1 below).
     Bottom two teams relegated to Rugby Pro D2.
2010–11 Top 14 Table
Club Played Won Drawn Lost Points for Points against Bonus points Points Head-to-head
1 Toulouse 26 17 1 8 664 485 12 82
2 Racing Métro 26 16 2 8 674 549 10 78
3 Castres 26 16 1 9 617 487 10 76
4 Clermont 26 15 0 11 600 445 12 72 Clermont: 10
Biarritz: 9
Montpellier: 9
5 Biarritz 26 15 1 10 647 571 10 72 Biarritz 5–4
6 Montpellier 26 15 1 10 602 495 10 72
7 Bayonne 26 16 0 10 569 508 7 71
8 Toulon 26 15 0 11 559 469 10 70
9 Perpignan 26 13 3 10 538 543 5 63
10 Agen 26 11 1 14 534 677 5 51
11 Stade Français 26 10 1 15 562 614 7 49
12 Brive 26 8 2 16 495 578 10 46
13 La Rochelle 26 6 1 19 476 673 7 33
14 Bourgoin 26 2 0 24 379 822 3 6 1


  • ^1 : On January 4, Bourgoin were deducted five points by the DNACG because of a predicted deficit of 1.5 million euros.[18] Bourgoin first decided to appeal this decision on January 10[19] before changing their minds on February 8, causing the point deduction to stand.[20]
Notes
  1. It was possible that the sixth-place team on the table would not qualify for the Heineken Cup. However, it would have occurred only if French teams had won both the Heineken Cup and Amlin Challenge Cup, both of these teams had finished outside the top six on the league table and avoided relegation, and the sixth-place team had not advanced to the Top 14 final (under LNR regulations, the participants in the final receive the first two priority spots on its Heineken Cup entry list, ahead of a French Heineken Cup winner).[7] This did not happen in 2010–11.
  2. Conversely, if the only French team to win a European trophy finished in the top six, or if both European trophy winners finished in the top six, the seventh-place finisher would receive a Heineken Cup berth. This also did not happen in 2010–11, as the cup winners were Leinster (Ireland, Heineken Cup) and Harlequins (England, Challenge Cup).

Results[edit]

As in recent seasons, several teams took occasional home matches to larger stadiums, either in their home city or a nearby location. In addition to Stade Français and Toulouse, whose use of larger venues is long-established, the following teams took home matches to other venues:

Key[edit]

The score of the game is given by the middle (third and fourth) columns. The first and last columns indicate the number of tries scored by the home and the away team, respectively. A blue border indicates that the team has earned an attacking bonus point (i.e. has scored at least three more tries than its opponent), a yellow one that the team has earned a defensive bonus point (defeat by 7 points or less).

Within each round, matches are listed in order of kickoff time. Matches with the same kickoff time are listed in alphabetic order of the home team. A dark horizontal line separates matches held on different dates.

Round 1

13 and 14 August

6 Toulouse 44 24 Agen 3
0 Brive 18 23 Racing Métro 92 2
2 Biarritz 30 22 Montpellier 3
1 Toulon 22 26 Bayonne 2
5 Paris 43 12 Bourgoin 0
0 Perpignan 21 13 Clermont 1
3 La Rochelle 22 17 Castres 2
Round 2

20 and 21 August

0 Bourgoin 12 25 Clermont 3
2 Brive 26 11 Perpignan 1
4 Montpellier 36 19 Racing Métro 92 1
3 Bayonne 27 0 Agen 0
5 Paris 41 26 La Rochelle 3
0 Biarritz 3 13 Toulon 1
1 Castres 22 16 Toulouse 1
Round 3

27 and 28 August

1 Toulon 31 36 Racing Métro 92 3
0 Perpignan 6 16 Montpellier 1
1 Agen 28 23 Biarritz 2
1 Castres 25 16 Bayonne 1
1 La Rochelle 20 12 Bourgoin 0
3 Clermont 33 9 Brive 0
3 Toulouse 34 16 Paris 1
Round 4

1 September

1 Montpellier 22 21 Toulouse 2
2 Perpignan 17 12 Biarritz 0
1 Bayonne 19 18 Brive 2
1 La Rochelle 13 15 Toulon 0
1 Bourgoin 22 15 Agen 0
5 Paris 40 34 Castres 3
1 Racing Métro 92 28 17 Clermont 1
Round 5

5 September

3 Agen 23 23 Perpignan 1
1 Castres 31 25 Racing Métro 92 1
2 Bourgoin 23 28 Bayonne 3
7 Toulouse 50 3 La Rochelle 0
3 Clermont 27 10 Montpellier 1
3 Brive 27 9 Toulon 0
1 Biarritz 19 11 Paris 1
Round 6

10 and 11 September

0 Bayonne 18 16 Clermont 1
2 Perpignan 27 20 Bourgoin 2
5 Racing Métro 92 43 18 La Rochelle 2
3 Paris 27 29 Brive 2
2 Montpellier 23 12 Castres 0
6 Toulon 41 10 Agen 1
1 Biarritz 25 20 Toulouse 2
Round 7

17 and 18 September

2 Toulouse 29 20 Bayonne 2
1 Perpignan 22 21 Paris 2
6 Racing Métro 92 51 20 Bourgoin 2
3 La Rochelle 23 29 Biarritz 2
1 Castres 28 6 Brive 0
0 Agen 6 35 Montpellier 4
1 Toulon 28 16 Clermont 1
Round 8

24 and 25 September

0 Bourgoin 3 26 Toulon 2
2 Agen 12 27 Paris 2
1 Racing Métro 92 17 12 Biarritz 0
1 Brive 16 16 Toulouse 1
2 Clermont 24 6 Castres 0
2 Bayonne 25 26 Perpignan 2
3 Montpellier 26 6 La Rochelle 0
Round 9

1 and 2 October

1 Toulon 22 15 Castres 0
2 Bourgoin 18 3 Brive 0
3 Paris 30 13 Montpellier 2
3 Perpignan 21 16 La Rochelle 1
7 Clermont 45 19 Agen 1
1 Toulouse 28 23 Racing Métro 92 1
1 Bayonne 19 22 Biarritz 1
Round 10

22 and 23 October

0 Racing Métro 92 15 9 Bayonne 0
5 Toulouse 38 29 Perpignan 2
4 Castres 38 11 Agen 1
3 La Rochelle 26 21 Brive 2
3 Montpellier 28 3 Bourgoin 0
1 Biarritz 16 13 Clermont 1
1 Paris 22 15 Toulon 0
Round 11

29 and 30 October

0 Racing Métro 92 18 18 Perpignan 0
3 Clermont 27 3 Paris 0
0 Bayonne 18 29 Montpellier 2
2 Agen 29 14 La Rochelle 2
6 Castres 41 24 Bourgoin 3
2 Brive 21 27 Biarritz 2
6 Toulouse 44 5 Toulon 1
Round 12

4 November

0 Agen 21 20 Racing Métro 92 1
3 Perpignan 20 29 Toulon 2
1 La Rochelle 22 14 Clermont 1
1 Biarritz 17 17 Castres 1
1 Paris 20 24 Bayonne 3
4 Montpellier 35 9 Brive 0
1 Bourgoin 11 35 Toulouse 4
Round 13

3–5 November

2 Toulon 29 13 Montpellier 1
0 Racing Métro 92 15 13 Paris 1
0 Brive 12 30 Agen 3
3 Castres 23 13 Perpignan 1
2 Bayonne 23 14 La Rochelle 1
2 Clermont 32 25 Toulouse 1
5 Biarritz 37 20 Bourgoin 2
Round 14

29 December

1 Montpellier 22 16 Biarritz 1
1 Bayonne 20 9 Toulon 0
1 Agen 8 25 Toulouse 1
3 Castres 25 10 La Rochelle 1
2 Bourgoin 16 26 Paris 2
0 Racing Métro 92 6 6 Brive 0
1 Clermont 22 16 Perpignan 1
Round 15

2 January

2 Perpignan 23 16 Brive 1
4 Toulon 38 26 Biarritz 2
2 Agen 21 3 Bayonne 0
4 Clermont 34 9 Bourgoin 0
2 La Rochelle 26 26 Paris 2
3 Racing Métro 92 28 16 Montpellier 1
2 Toulouse 23 16 Castres 1
Round 16

7–9 January

2 Brive 29 22 Clermont 3
0 Montpellier 12 12 Perpignan 0
10 Biarritz 65 22 Agen 3
1 Bayonne 25 22 Castres 1
2 Bourgoin 14 44 La Rochelle 5
3 Paris 31 3 Toulouse 0
0 Racing Métro 92 15 12 Toulon 0
Round 17

26 and 27 January

3 Clermont 31 15 Racing Métro 92 0
2 Biarritz 23 21 Perpignan 3
2 Brive 18 26 Bayonne 3
2 Toulon 12 9 La Rochelle 0
2 Agen 23 9 Bourgoin 0
3 Castres 34 12 Paris 0
4 Toulouse 29 9 Montpellier 0
Round 18

11 and 12 February

1 La Rochelle 19 22 Toulouse 1
1 Toulon 22 16 Brive 1
5 Perpignan 31 18 Agen 2
2 Racing Métro 92 20 13 Castres 1
3 Bayonne 24 7 Bourgoin 1
4 Montpellier 29 9 Clermont 0
1 Paris 31 18 Biarritz 0
Round 19

18 and 19 February

1 Brive 26 10 Paris 2
0 Bourgoin 15 32 Perpignan 2
2 La Rochelle 24 32 Racing Métro 92 2
5 Castres 43 29 Montpellier 4
2 Clermont 24 19 Bayonne 1
2 Toulouse 23 19 Biarritz 1
2 Agen 23 13 Toulon 1
Round 20

4 and 5 March

1 Clermont 19 12 Toulon 2
0 Paris 9 21 Perpignan 2
1 Bourgoin 19 38 Racing Métro 92 4
4 Biarritz 32 30 La Rochelle 4
0 Brive 12 20 Castres 2
1 Bayonne 19 13 Toulouse 1
1 Montpellier 25 24 Agen 3
Round 21

11 March

2 Perpignan 25 19 Bayonne 2
4 Biarritz 36 32 Racing Métro 92 2
1 Toulouse 23 22 Brive 1
2 La Rochelle 20 16 Montpellier 1
6 Toulon 39 17 Bourgoin 2
1 Paris 22 18 Agen 0
2 Castres 23 19 Clermont 2
Round 22

25–27 March

0 Castres 18 12 Toulon 0
1 La Rochelle 16 34 Perpignan 5
7 Brive 50 6 Bourgoin 0
2 Agen 26 17 Clermont 2
4 Biarritz 40 10 Bayonne 1
3 Racing Métro 92 43 21 Toulouse 0
2 Montpellier 29 23 Paris 1
Round 23

1 and 2 April

2 Perpignan 24 25 Toulouse 2
2 Bayonne 26 16 Racing Métro 92 1
3 Brive 26 9 La Rochelle 0
3 Bourgoin 27 42 Montpellier 5
4 Toulon 38 10 Paris 1
6 Clermont 41 13 Biarritz 2
2 Agen 21 16 Castres 1
Round 24

15 and 16 April

1 La Rochelle 19 29 Agen 2
0 Paris 12 20 Clermont 2
2 Perpignan 23 16 Racing Métro 92 1
1 Montpellier 17 22 Bayonne 3
8 Biarritz 52 26 Brive 4
4 Bourgoin 22 33 Castres 4
2 Toulon 21 9 Toulouse 0
Round 25

22 and 23 April

1 Castres 16 13 Biarritz 1
7 Racing Métro 92 51 34 Agen 4
7 Bayonne 54 20 Paris 2
5 Toulouse 33 0 Bourgoin 0
6 Clermont 34 10 La Rochelle 1
4 Toulon 43 12 Perpignan 0
2 Brive 23 21 Montpellier 2
Round 26

7 May

2 Perpignan 10 29 Castres 4
1 Paris 16 29 Racing Métro 92 3
2 Bourgoin 18 22 Biarritz 1
1 La Rochelle 17 30 Bayonne 3
6 Agen 36 10 Brive 1
3 Montpellier 27 3 Toulon 0
2 Toulouse 15 6 Clermont 0

Playoffs[edit]

  Quarterfinals     Semifinals     Final
                           
      1  Toulouse 29  
  4  Clermont 27     4  Clermont 6    
  5  Biarritz 17         1  Toulouse 15
      6  Montpellier 10
      2  Racing Métro 25    
  3  Castres 17     6  Montpellier 26  
  6  Montpellier 18  

All times are in Central European Summer Time (UTC+2).

Quarter-finals[edit]

13 May 2011
21:00
Clermont 27 – 17 Biarritz
Try: James 57' c
Lapandry 68' c
Malzieu 73' c
Con: Parra (2/2)
James (1/1)
Pen: Floch (1/1) 14'
Parra (1/2) 40+2'
Report Try: Yachvili 30' c
Peyrelongue 37' c
Con: Yachvili (2/2)
Pen: Yachvili (1/2) 20'

14 May 2011
16:25
Castres 17 – 18 Montpellier
Try: Diarra 5' c
Penalty try 40' c
Con: Teulet (2/2)
Pen: Teulet (1/4) 54'
Report Pen: Bustos Moyano (6/7) 8', 29', 33', 44', 49', 71'
Stade Pierre-Antoine, Castres
Attendance: 10,012[22]
Referee: Franck Maciello

Semi-finals[edit]

27 May 2011
21:00
Toulouse 29 – 6 Clermont
Try: Caucaunibuca (2) 8' c, 80+3' c
Con: Skrela (1/1)
Bézy (1/1)
Pen: Skrela (4/4) 6', 22', 47', 54'
Bézy (1/4) 79'
Report Pen: Floch (1/1) 15'
Parra (1/2) 35'
Stade Vélodrome, Marseille
Attendance: 56,676[23]
Referee: Jérôme Garcès

28 May 2011
16:25
Racing Métro 25 – 26 Montpellier
Try: Bobo 52' m
Wisniewski 62' c
Qovu 76' c
Con: Wisniewski (2/3)
Pen: Steyn (1/1) 4'
Wisniewski (1/3) 16'
Report Try: Mirande 33' c
Fernández 42' c
Con: Bustos Moyano (2/2)
Pen: Bustos Moyano (4/5) 13', 19', 51', 79'
Stade Vélodrome, Marseille
Attendance: 56,855[24]
Referee: Romain Poite

Final[edit]

4 June 2011
20:45
Toulouse 15 – 10 Montpellier
Pen: Skrela (3/8) 38', 47', 67'
Bézy (2/2) 70', 75'
Report Try: Nagusa 26' c
Con: Bustos Moyano (1/1)
Drop: Trinh-Duc (1/3) 41'
FB 15 France Cédric Heymans Substituted off 49'
RW 14 France Maxime Médard
OC 13 France Yannick Jauzion Substituted off 61'
IC 12 France Clément Poitrenaud
LW 11 Fiji Rupeni Caucaunibuca Substituted off 65'
FH 10 France David Skrela Substituted off 67'
SH 9 France Jean-Marc Doussain
N8 8 France Louis Picamoles
OF 7 France Thierry Dusautoir (c)
BF 6 France Jean Bouilhou Substituted off 56'
RL 5 Argentina Patricio Albacete
LL 4 France Romain Millo-Chluski Substituted off 48'
TP 3 Samoa Census Johnston Substituted off 76'
HK 2 France William Servat Substituted off 31'
LP 1 South Africa Daan Human Substituted off 48'
Replacements:
HK 16 France Virgile Lacombe Substituted in 31'
PR 17 France Jean-Baptiste Poux Substituted in 48'
LK 18 France Yoann Maestri Substituted in 48'
FL 19 France Yannick Nyanga Substituted in 56'
FH 20 France Nicolas Bézy Substituted in 67'
CE 21 France Florian Fritz Substituted in 49'
WG 22 France Vincent Clerc Substituted in 65'
PR 23 New Zealand Johnson Falefa Substituted in 76'
Coach: France Guy Novès
FB 15 France Benjamin Thiéry
RW 14 Fiji Timoci Nagusa Temporarily suspended from 33' to 43' 33' to 43' Substituted off 58'
OC 13 France Sylvain Mirande Substituted off 68'
IC 12 Argentina Santiago Fernández
LW 11 Argentina Martín Bustos Moyano
FH 10 France François Trinh-Duc
SH 9 France Julien Tomas Substituted off 65'
N8 8 Fiji Masi Matadigo
OF 7 Georgia (country) Mamuka Gorgodze
BF 6 France Fulgence Ouedraogo (c) Substituted off 67'
RL 5 France Aliki Fakaté Substituted off 53'
LL 4 South Africa Drikus Hancke
TP 3 Georgia (country) Giorgi Jgenti Substituted off 78'
HK 2 Spain Fabien Rofes Substituted off 53'
LP 1 Argentina Juan Figallo Substituted off 71' Substituted in 78'
Replacements:
HK 16 France Joan Caudullo Substituted in 53'
PR 17 Samoa Na'ama Leleimalefaga Substituted in 71'
LK 18 France Mickaël de Marco Substituted in 53'
FL 19 France Vassili Bost Substituted in 67'
SH 20 France Benoît Paillaugue Substituted in 65' Temporarily suspended from 74' to 80' 74' to 80'
WG 21 France Pierre Bérard Substituted in 58'
CE 22 South Africa Grant Rees Substituted in 68'
PR 23 South Africa Danie Thiart
Coach: France Fabien Galthié

Individual statistics[edit]

Correct as of June 5, 2011

Top points scorers[edit]

Player Team Points
France Jonathan Wisniewski Racing Métro 336
France Romain Teulet Castres 326
Argentina Martín Bustos Moyano Montpellier 283
England Jonny Wilkinson Toulon 274
France Jérôme Porical Perpignan 268
France Dimitri Yachvili Biarritz 256
France Benjamin Boyet Bayonne 233
France David Skrela Toulouse 215
France Mathieu Bélie Brive 197
France Julien Dupuy Stade Français 179

[26]

Top try scorers[edit]

Player Team Tries
France Maxime Médard Toulouse 15
France Yoann Huget Bayonne 12
France Julien Malzieu Clermont 11
Fiji Timoci Nagusa Montpellier 11
France Marc Andreu Castres 10
United States Takudzwa Ngwenya Biarritz 9
Samoa Joe Tekori Castres 9
France Yoan Audrin Castres 8
Fiji Sireli Bobo Racing Métro 8
England Ollie Phillips Stade Français 8

[26]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ "Stade Français beat the drop". ESPN Scrum. 4 June 2011. Retrieved 4 June 2011. 
  2. ^ "French government will not bail Stade out". ESPN Scrum. 24 June 2011. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  3. ^ "Le Stade français maintenu". Midi Olympique (in French). 27 June 2011. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  4. ^ "Stade Francais secure top flight status". ESPN Scrum. 27 June 2011. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  5. ^ "Financial strife sees Montauban relegated". Scrum.com. 2010-04-26. Archived from the original on 1 May 2010. Retrieved 2010-05-30. 
  6. ^ "Heineken Cup – Key Tournament Rules". European Rugby Cup. Retrieved 2010-06-03. 
  7. ^ a b c "Article 328, Section 3.1 – Participation des clubs français en Coupes d’Europe", Reglements de la Ligue Nationale de Rugby 2009/2010, Chapitre 2 : Règlement sportif des championnats professionnels (in French) (Ligue Nationale de Rugby)  Downloadable from the official LNR site here; click on the link immediately below "REGLEMENTS DE LA LIGUE NATIONALE DE RUGBY 2009-2010". No change is expected for the 2010–11 season.
  8. ^ "French try out new bonus point system". Planet-Rugby.com. 2007-06-27. Retrieved 2007-08-13. 
  9. ^ a b "Article 330, Section 3.2. Points "terrain"". Reglements de la Ligue Nationale de Rugby 2008/2009, Chapitre 2 : Règlement sportif du Championnat de France Professionnel (in French). Ligue Nationale de Rugby. Retrieved 2008-08-27. 
  10. ^ a b c Moriarty, Ian (2009-12-18). "Salary cap just sleight of hand". Scrum.com. Retrieved 2010-06-01. 
  11. ^ a b c d "Top 14 set for salary cap". Scrum.com. 2009-12-17. Retrieved 2010-06-01. 
  12. ^ a b Moriarty, Ian (2009-11-11). "French rugby heading for crisis". Scrum.com. Retrieved 2010-06-01. 
  13. ^ "Montauban face Top 14 ruin". Scrum.com. 2010-04-01. Retrieved 2010-04-01. 
  14. ^ a b "Bourgoin embroiled in fresh financial trouble". Scrum.com. 2010-07-02. Retrieved 2010-07-04. 
  15. ^ Moriarty, Ian (2010-07-06). "Time to hit the panic button?". Scrum.com. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  16. ^ "Bourgoin maintenu en Top 14" (in French). 2010-07-09. Archived from the original on 11 July 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-09. 
  17. ^ Moriarty, Ian (2011-05-17). "Times are changing in Paris". ESPN Scrum. Retrieved 2011-05-17. 
  18. ^ "Décision du Conseil Supérieur de la DNACG suite à la situation du CS Bourgoin-Jallieu" (in French). LNR. 2011-01-04. Retrieved 2011-05-09. 
  19. ^ "Communiqué de presse du CSBJ - Lundi 10 janvier 2011" (in French). CS Bourgoin-Jallieu. 2011-01-10. Retrieved 2011-05-09. 
  20. ^ "Bourgoin : Sanction définitive" (in French). L'Équipe. 2011-02-08. Retrieved 2011-05-09. 
  21. ^ "Clermont – Biarritz, Top 14 (vendredi 13 mai 2011), Fiche Match" (in French). L'Équipe. 2011-05-13. Retrieved 2011-05-15. 
  22. ^ "Castres – Montpellier, Top 14 (samedi 14 mai 2011), Fiche Match" (in French). L'Équipe. 2011-05-14. Retrieved 2011-05-15. 
  23. ^ "Toulouse – Clermont, Top 14 (vendredi 27 mai 2011), Fiche Match" (in French). L'Équipe. 2011-05-27. Retrieved 2011-05-28. 
  24. ^ "Racing-Métro 92 – Montpellier, Top 14 (samedi 28 mai 2011), Fiche Match" (in French). L'Équipe. 2011-05-28. Retrieved 2011-05-28. 
  25. ^ "Top 14 Finale: Fiche Match". L'Équipe (in French). 2011-06-04. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  26. ^ a b "Points". It's Rugby. Retrieved 2011-06-05. 

External links[edit]