2010–11 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
2010–11 Princeton Tigers men's basketball
Princeton Tigers Logo.svg
Ivy League Co-Champion
One-game playoff vs. Harvard, Won 63–62
2011 NCAA Tournament, #13 Seed, lost 59–57 to Kentucky, round of 64
Conference Ivy League
2010–11 record 25–7 (12–2, 1st-T Ivy League)
Head coach Sydney Johnson (4th year)
Captain Kareem Maddox
Captain Dan Mavraides
Captain Patrick Saunders
Home arena Jadwin Gymnasium
Seasons
« 2009–10 2011–12 »
2010–11 Ivy League men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Princeton 12 2   .857     25 7   .781
Harvard 12 2   .857     23 7   .767
Yale 8 6   .571     15 13   .536
Penn 7 7   .500     13 15   .464
Columbia 6 8   .429     15 13   .536
Cornell 6 8   .429     10 18   .357
Brown 4 10   .286     11 17   .393
Dartmouth 1 13   .071     5 23   .179
As of March 17, 2011; Rankings from AP Poll

The 2010–11 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team represented Princeton University in intercollegiate college basketball during the 2010–11 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The head coach was Sydney Johnson, who was in his fourth season.[1] The team's tri-captains were senior Kareem Maddox, senior Dan Mavraides, and junior Patrick Saunders. The team played its home games in the Jadwin Gymnasium on the University campus in Princeton, New Jersey. The team competes in the Ivy League athletic conference. The team was coming off of a 22–9 2009–10 season in which it achieved the most wins by a Tigers men's basketball team since the 1998–99 team and its first back-to-back finishes of at least second place in the Ivy since 2001–02 season. The team was also following on the heels of its first postseason appearance since the 2003–04 team went to the 2004 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament,[2] and its first postseason victory since the 1998–99 team won two games in the 1999 National Invitation Tournament.[3]

The team was led by returning second team All-Ivy League selections junior Douglas Davis and senior Dan Mavraides.[4] This was the first team to have two returning first or second All-Ivy players since the 2003–04 team returned Will Venable and Judson Wallace. The team was attempting to defend its scoring defense statistical championship, which it won for the twentieth time since 1976 in 2010.[5][6] Following the season, seniors Mavraides (2nd team) and Maddox (1st team, unanimous) earned All-Ivy recognition. They were joined by sophomore Ian Hummer (2nd team). Maddox earned conference Defensive Player of the Year.

After the annual 14-game round robin home and away schedule, Harvard and Princeton tied as co-champion, resulting in a one-game playoff to determine the league's automatic bid to the 2011 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. The Tigers prevailed. Princeton then lost its round of 64 NCAA contest against Kentucky. The season marked the team's 26th Ivy League championship and 24th invitation to the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship.

Preview[edit]

Princeton entered the season having not won a championship since the 2003–04 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team achieved the feat and went to the 2004 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.[7][8] The six-season championshipless spell tied a school record and put the team on the verge of establishing a new one should the season not be successful.[7] The team entered the season with its top five scorers from the prior season returning.[9] The team's schedule included the 2010 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament champion Duke as well as Tournament participant Siena who were the 2010 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference champions (both regular season and tournament).[10]

Most preseason publications predicted Princeton would finish in first place and Harvard would finish in second place, although the Sporting News projected that Cornell would finish in first followed by Princeton and Harvard.[11] Breaking a three-year streak by Cornell, the Ivy League media poll selected Princeton as the top team with twelve first place votes, Harvard second with four first place votes and Cornell third with one first place vote.[11] It was the first Princeton team to be the preseason top-ranked media selection since the 2004–05 Princeton team.[11]

Playing style[edit]

Head coach Johnson employs the Princeton offense.[12] However, in 2010, Johnson tweaked it to be a slightly more uptempo version of the motion offense, which resulted in the highest scoring Princeton team in decades.[13] The offense was still considered slow compared to most schools.[14]

Schedule[edit]

The team lost to its only two ranked opponents (#1 Duke and #21 University of Central Florida),[15][16] but defeated Siena in overtime.[17] The team also defeated power conference opponents Tulsa of Conference USA, Saint Joseph's of the Atlantic 10 Conference and Rutgers of the Big East Conference.[18][19][20] Princeton recorded its 11th and the Ivy League's 30th perfect conference record at the halfway point of the 14-game conference schedule.[21] The team posted a perfect 12–0 home record.[22] It was the team's sixth perfect home season in 42 full seasons at Jadwin gymnasium.[21] In 2009, the team adopted 11-year-old Christian Michael "Crunch" Regulski, a pediatric brain tumor patient, as part of the Friends of Jaclyn program. In early February, Crunch, who had previously sat on the team's bench, lost his cancer struggle.[23] During the season, Princeton swept defending Ivy League champion Cornell.[24]

Mavraides scored 25 including 5 three-point shots,[14] but Princeton lost to Harvard at Lavietes Pavilion on March 5 and giving them a split of the season series.[25][26] Princeton fell a half game behind Harvard who clinched at least a share of the 2010–11 Ivy League men's basketball season Championship with a 12–2 conference record. Princeton fell to 11–2 with one conference game remaining to force a one-game playoff for the conferences automatic bid to the 2011 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.[25] Following the game, Sydney Johnson made his team sit on the bench and watch the Harvard fans celebrate.[27] On March 8, Princeton defeated Penn to force a one-game playoff at the Payne Whitney Gymnasium at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.[7] Maddox scored 21 of his 23 points from off the bench in the second half to key the victory.[14][28]

The one-game playoff is the eighth in Ivy League history and the eighth for Princeton, who has won at least a share of twenty-six league titles.[7][29] The share of the championship ended a six-season championshipless run, which tied a record for the longest in school history.[7] In the one-game playoff, Harvard took 58–57 lead with 2:33 remaining and then the teams traded one-point leads 5 times.[30] Princeton won by a 63–62 margin thanks to a last second shot by Davis to earn its 24th NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament bid.[31][32] Although Princeton did not appear in the 2010–11 NCAA Division I men's basketball rankings all season, in the final regular season poll on March 13, Princeton received 3 points in the Coaches' Poll.[33]

Princeton was awarded the number thirteen seed and a first round match against the Kentucky Wildcats.[34] Kentucky had eliminated Ivy League representative Cornell the prior season.[35] Kentucky emerged victorious by a 59–57 margin on a last second layup.[36][37]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance Record
Regular season
November 12, 2010* 7:00 pm Rutgers Jadwin GymnasiumPrinceton, NJ W 78–73 OT 3,530 1–0
November 14, 2010* 5:00 pm at #1 Duke Cameron Indoor StadiumDurham, NC
(O'Reilly Auto Parts CBE Classic)
ESPNU L 60–97  9,314 1–1
November 22, 2010* 7:00 pm at James Madison JMU Convocation CenterHarrisonburg, VA
(CBE Classic)
L 64–65  3,113 1–2
November 23, 2010* 4:30 pm vs. Bucknell JMU Convocation Center • Harrisonburg, VA
(CBE Classic)
W 66–55    2–2
November 24, 2010* 4:30 pm vs. Presbyterian JMU Convocation Center • Harrisonburg, VA
(CBE Classic)
L 67–69    2–3
November 28, 2010* 2:00 pm Sienna Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ W 86–77 OT 1,906 3–3
November 30, 2010* 7:00 pm at Lafayette Allan P. Kirby ArenaEaston, PA LFSN W 82–64  1,559 4–3
December 5, 2010* 5:30 pm Saint Joseph's Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ W 74–65  2,010 5–3
December 8, 2010* 7:00 pm at Monmouth Multipurpose Activity CenterWest Long Branch, NJ W 64–61  1,287 6–3
December 12, 2010* 2:00 pm at Tulsa Reynolds CenterTulsa, OK W 82–78 2OT 4,855 7–3
December 17, 2010* 7:00 pm at Wagner Spiro Sports CenterStaten Island, NY TWCSN W 69–57  1,027 8–3
December 22, 2010* 4:00 pm at Towson Towson CenterTowson, MD W 75–65  1,891 9–3
December 29, 2010* 9:30 pm vs. Northeastern UCF ArenaOrlando, FL
(UCF Holiday Classic)
W 65–63  7,111 10–3
December 30, 2010* 7:30 pm at #19 UCF UCF Arena • Orlando, FL
(UCF Holiday Classic)
L 62–68  5,591 10–4
January 5, 2011* 7:00 pm Marist Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ W 68–57  1,539 11–4
January 23, 2011* 6:00 pm College of New Jersey Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ W 73–40  1,837 12–4
January 28, 2011 7:00 pm Brown Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ FiOS1 W 78–60  2,330 13–4 (1–0)
January 29, 2011 6:00 pm Yale Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ W 67–63  2,658 14–4 (2–0)
February 4, 2011 7:00 pm Harvard Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ ESPNU W 65–61  4,148 15–4 (3–0)
February 5, 2011 6:00 pm Dartmouth Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ W 68–53  3,346 16–4 (4–0)
February 8, 2011 7:00 pm Penn Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ
(Penn–Princeton Rivalry)
FiOS1/TCN W 62–59 OT 3,840 17–4 (5–0)
February 11, 2011 7:00 pm at Columbia Levien GymnasiumNew York, NY W 76–46  1,953 18–4 (6–0)
February 12, 2011 7:00 pm at Cornell Newman ArenaIthaca, NY W 57–55  4,087 19–4 (7–0)
February 18, 2011 7:00 pm at Yale Payne Whitney GymNew Haven, CT YES W 58–51  1,935 20–4 (8–0)
February 19, 2011 3:00 pm at Brown Pizzitola Sports CenterProvidence, RI L 65–75  1,407 20–5 (8–1)
February 25, 2011 7:00 pm Cornell Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ FiOS1 W 84–66  3,864 21–5 (9–1)
February 26, 2011 6:00 pm Columbia Jadwin Gymnasium • Princeton, NJ W 66–61  4,412 22–5 (10–1)
March 4, 2011 7:00 pm at Dartmouth Leede ArenaHanover, NH W 77–55  978 23–5 (11–1)
March 5, 2011 7:00 pm at Harvard Lavietes PavilionBoston, MA ESPN3 L 67–79  2,195 23–6 (11–2)
March 8, 2011 7:00 pm at Penn PalestraPhiladelphia, PA
(Penn–Princeton Rivalry)
ESPN3 W 70–58  4,679 24–6 (12–2)
Ivy League Playoff
March 12, 2011 4:00 pm vs. Harvard Payne Whitney Gymnasium • New Haven, CT ESPN3 W 63–62    25–6
2011 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament
March 17, 2011* 2:45 pm vs. #11 Kentucky St. Pete Times ForumTampa, FL
(Second Round)
CBS L 57–59  14,835 25–7
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Time.

Honors[edit]

In season[edit]

Ian Hummer was a National Association of Basketball Coaches First Team All-District selection, and Kareem Maddox was a Second Team selection.[38] Each week the Ivy League selects a player of the week and a rookie of the week.[39]

Player of the Week
Date Name School Class Position
December 6, 2010 Ian Hummer Princeton So. F
December 13, 2010 Kareem Maddox Princeton Sr. F
December 20, 2010 Kareem Maddox Princeton Sr. F
February 28, 2011 Kareem Maddox Princeton Sr. F

Postseason honors[edit]

The league selected its postseason awards on March 9.[40]
Defensive Player of the Year: Kareem Maddox, Princeton (Sr., F, Oak Park, CA)
All-Ivy League (ALL CAPS: Unanimous)

First Team All-Ivy: KAREEM MADDOX, Princeton (Sr., F, Oak Park, CA)
Second Team All-Ivy: Ian Hummer, Princeton (So., F, Vienna, VA); Dan Mavraides, Princeton (Sr., G, San Mateo, CA)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Men's Basketball Record Book • All-Time Results". Princeton Athletic Communications. 2010-10-08. 
  2. ^ "Saint Louis Ends Men's Basketball's Postseason Run, 69–59 (with video)". Princeton University. 2010-03-25. Retrieved 2010-10-07. 
  3. ^ "Men's Basketball Gets First Postseason Win Since '99 (with video)". Princeton University. 2010-03-17. Retrieved 2010-10-07. 
  4. ^ "Davis, Mavraides Tabbed as All-Ivy for Men's Basketball". Princeton University. 2010-03-10. Retrieved 2010-10-07. 
  5. ^ "Men's Basketball Ranking Summary". National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved 2010-10-07. 
  6. ^ "Division I Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 48. Retrieved 2010-10-02. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "Princeton tops Penn, sets up one-game playoff with Harvard". ESPN. 2011-03-08. Retrieved 2011-03-09. 
  8. ^ Abrams, Mike (2011-03-04). "Men's Basketball: Princeton on doorstep of Big Dance". The Daily Princetonian. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  9. ^ "Princeton Tigers Stats – 2009–10". ESPN. Retrieved 2011-04-24. 
  10. ^ "M. Basketball – 2010–11 Schedule". Princeton University. Retrieved 2010-10-08. 
  11. ^ a b c "Ivy League Men's Basketball Abound with Preseason Honors Entering the 2010–11 Season". Ivyleaguesports.com. 2010-10-15. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  12. ^ Plutnicki, Ken (2009-02-10). "The Quad Q.& A.: Princeton Coach Sydney Johnson". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  13. ^ Cohen, Ben (2010-12-14). "Princeton Moves Into the Fast(er) Lane: The Tigers Are Using the Same Intricate Half-Court Offense They Made Famous—They're Just Pushing the Tempo More". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2011-03-14. 
  14. ^ a b c Friedman, Dick (2011-03-11). "Harvard, Princeton meet in a winner-take-all game for Ivy title". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2011-03-14. 
  15. ^ "Blue Devils push nonconference winning streak at Cameron to 78 games". ESPN. 2010-11-14. Archived from the original on 27 February 2011. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  16. ^ "Marcus Jordan's second-half surge helps Central Florida stay unbeaten". ESPN. 2010-12-30. Archived from the original on 28 February 2011. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  17. ^ "Princeton 86, Siena 77". ESPN. 2010-11-28. Archived from the original on 28 February 2011. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  18. ^ "Princeton nips Rutgers in OT, spoils coach Mike Rice's debut". ESPN. 2010-11-12. Archived from the original on 28 February 2011. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  19. ^ "Princeton 82, Tulsa 78". ESPN. 2010-12-12. Archived from the original on 28 February 2011. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  20. ^ "Princeton 74, Saint Joseph's 65". ESPN. 2010-12-05. Archived from the original on 28 February 2011. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  21. ^ a b "2010–11 Highlights". Ivyleaguesports.com. p. 5. 
  22. ^ "Princeton 66, Columbia 61". ESPN. 2011-02-26. Retrieved 2011-02-27. 
  23. ^ McMurphy, Brett (2011-03-17). "Princeton Players Driven by Memories of ‘Crunch’". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-03-17. 
  24. ^ "Princeton and Harvard Keep Pace". The New York Times. 2011-02-25. Retrieved 2011-03-17. 
  25. ^ a b "Harvard tops Princeton 79–67 to share Ivy title". ESPN. 2011-03-05. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  26. ^ May, Peter (2011-03-05). "Harvard Has Piece of Title but Wants the Rest of It". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 6 March 2011. Retrieved 2011-03-17. 
  27. ^ "Harvard Celebrates Early". ESPN. 2011-03-07. Retrieved 2011-03-09. 
  28. ^ "Princeton Forces a Playoff for the Ivy’s N.C.A.A. Bid". The New York Times. 2011-03-08. Retrieved 2011-03-17. 
  29. ^ "2011 Men's Basketball Playoff Information". Ivyleaguesports.com. 2011-03-11. Retrieved 2011-03-12. 
  30. ^ "Harvard 62 (23–6, 12–2 Ivy); Princeton 63 (25–6, 12–2 Ivy) Complete Play-By-Play". ESPN. 2011-03-12. Retrieved 2011-05-05. 
  31. ^ "Princeton KO's Harvard on last-second jumper to earn NCAA bid". ESPN. 2011-03-12. Retrieved 2011-03-12. 
  32. ^ Pennington, Bill (2011-03-12). "Princeton Pauses but Still Beats Buzzer on Way to N.C.A.A. Bid". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-03-17. 
  33. ^ "Top 25: Ohio State finishes regular season at No. 1". USAToday. 2011-03-13. Archived from the original on 2011-03-15. Retrieved 2011-03-15. 
  34. ^ "2011 NCAA tournament selections". ESPN. 2011-03-13. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  35. ^ Ennis, Connor (2011-03-16). "Looking Ahead to Thursday’s Games". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 17 March 2011. Retrieved 2011-03-17. 
  36. ^ "Brandon Knight's only basket lifts Kentucky past Princeton in final seconds". ESPN. 2011-03-17. Retrieved 2011-03-17. 
  37. ^ McMurphy, Brett (2011-03-18). "Pushed by Princeton, Kentucky Wins in Final Seconds". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-03-19. 
  38. ^ "2010–11 Highlights". Ivyleaguesports.com. p. 3. 
  39. ^ "2010–11 Ivy League MEN’S BASKETBALL". IvyLeagueSports.com. 2011-03-07. Retrieved 2011-03-08. 
  40. ^ "Men's Basketball All-Ivy – 2010–11". Ivyleaguesports.com. 2011-03-09. Retrieved 2011-03-12. 

External links[edit]