2010 Asian Games medal table

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Liu Xiang from China won a gold medal in 110 metres hurdles.

The 2010 Asian Games, also known as the XVI Asiad, was a multi-sport event held in Guangzhou, China from 12 to 27 November 2010. The event saw 9,704 athletes from 45 National Olympic Committees (NOCs) competing in 476 events in 42 sports.[1] This medal table ranks the participating NOCs by the number of gold medals won by their athletes.

Athletes from 35 NOCs (Kuwait participated under the Olympic flag due to the suspension of its NOC)[2][3] won medals, leaving 9 NOCs without a medal, and 29 of them won at least one gold medal. China led the medal table for the eighth consecutive time in the Asian Games.[4] They led all the medal categories, winning the most gold medals (199), the most silver medals (119), the most bronze medals (98) and the most medals overall (416, nearly 40% of all medals awarded). Macau and Bangladesh won their first Asian Games gold medals, from wushu and cricket, respectively.[5][6]

Medal table[edit]

Rustam Kasimdzhanov from Uzbekistan won a gold medal in chess.
Wong Kam-po from Hong Kong won a gold medal in cycling – men's road race.
Olga Rypakova from Kazakhstan won a gold medal in triple jump and a silver in long jump.
Somdev Devvarman from India won a gold medal in tennis men's single.
2010 Asian Games

The ranking in this table is consistent with International Olympic Committee convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won (in this context, a "nation" is an entity represented by an NOC). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals. If nations are still tied, equal ranking is given and they are listed alphabetically by IOC country code.

A total of 1,577 medals (477 gold, 479 silver and 621 bronze) were awarded. The total number of bronze medals is greater than the total number of gold or silver medals because two bronze medals were awarded per event in 15 sports: badminton,[7] boxing,[8] cue sports,[9] fencing,[10] judo,[11] kabaddi,[12] karate,[13] sepaktakraw,[14] soft tennis,[15] squash,[16] table tennis,[17] taekwondo,[18] tennis,[19] wrestling,[20] and wushu (except for taolu events).[21]

This discrepancy is also caused by ties. In men's floor events in artistic gymnastics, there was a tie for the gold medal and no silver was awarded.[22] There were also ties for the silver medal in men's 200 metres breaststroke in swimming,[23] men's pole vault in athletics,[24] and men's doubles in bowling.[25][26] Thus, no bronzes were awarded in these events. Lastly, ties for third in both canoeing’s men's K1 1000 metres[27] and athletics’ women’s high jump,[28] as well as a three-way tie for third in athletics’ men’s high jump,[29] meant that multiple bronze medals were awarded for these events.

      Host nation

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  China (CHN) 199 119 98 416
2  South Korea (KOR) 76 65 91 232
3  Japan (JPN) 48 74 94 216
4  Iran (IRI) 20 15 24 59
5  Kazakhstan (KAZ) 18 23 38 79
6  India (IND) 14 17 34 65
7  Chinese Taipei (TPE) 13 16 38 67
8  Uzbekistan (UZB) 11 22 23 56
9  Thailand (THA) 11 9 32 52
10  Malaysia (MAS) 9 18 14 41
11  Hong Kong (HKG) 8 15 17 40
12  North Korea (PRK) 6 10 20 36
13  Saudi Arabia (KSA) 5 3 5 13
14  Bahrain (BRN) 5 0 4 9
15  Indonesia (INA) 4 9 13 26
16  Singapore (SIN) 4 7 6 17
17  Athletes from Kuwait (IOC) 4 6 1 11
18  Qatar (QAT) 4 4 7 16
19  Philippines (PHI) 3 4 9 16
20  Pakistan (PAK) 3 2 3 8
21  Mongolia (MGL) 2 5 9 16
22  Myanmar (MYA) 2 5 3 10
23  Jordan (JOR) 2 2 2 6
24  Vietnam (VIE) 1 17 15 33
25  Kyrgyzstan (KGZ) 1 2 2 5
26  Macau (MAC) 1 1 4 6
27  Bangladesh (BAN) 1 1 1 3
28  Tajikistan (TJK) 1 0 3 4
29  Syria (SYR) 1 0 1 2
30  United Arab Emirates (UAE) 0 4 1 5
31  Afghanistan (AFG) 0 2 1 3
32  Iraq (IRQ) 0 1 2 3
32  Lebanon (LIB) 0 1 2 3
34  Laos (LAO) 0 0 2 2
35  Nepal (NEP) 0 0 1 1
35  Oman (OMA) 0 0 1 1
Total 477 479 621 1577

Changes in medal standings[edit]

Ruling date Sport Event Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
19 November 2010 Judo Men's 81 kg Uzbekistan −1 −1
Japan +1 −1 0
Kazakhstan +1 −1 0
24 January 2011 Athletics Discus throw Qatar –1 −1
Iran +1 −1 0
India +1 +1

On 19 November 2010, the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) announced that Uzbek judoka Shokir Muminov had been stripped of his silver medal in the 81 kg bout after he tested positive for methylhexanamine.[30] The two bronze medalists, Japan's Masahiro Takamatsu and Kazakhstan's Islam Bozbayev, were promoted as silver medalists.[31]

On 24 January 2011, the OCA stripped Qatari Ahmed Dheeb of his silver medal in discus throw after he tested positive for exogenous testosterone metabolites.[32] The bronze medalist, Iran's Mohammad Samimi was promoted as silver medalist and India's Vikas Gowda was promoted as bronze medalist.[33]

Medal distribution[edit]

Map of Asia illustrating the countries/regions that have won medal(s) in the 2010 Asian Games
1dagger
2*
|
3*
4#
5#
6#
7*
8*
— 9*
10*
11*
12*
13dagger
14*
15*
16*
17*
18*
19*
20^
21dagger
|
22*
23*
24
25*
26*
27^
28^
29*
30#
31*
— 32*
33*
34*
35#
36*
37*
38*
39*
40#
41#
42
43*
44*
45#
Map of Asia illustrating the countries/regions that have won medal(s) in the 2010 Asian Games
Participating NOCs with:   at least one gold medal (*);   at least one silver medal (dagger);   at least one bronze medal (^);   no medals (#). Red diamond: first gold medal. Yellow circle: host city.
  1. Afghanistan
  2. Bahrain
  3. Bangladesh
  4. Bhutan
  5. Brunei
  6. Cambodia
  7. China
  8. North Korea
  9. Hong Kong, China
  1. India
  2. Indonesia
  3. Iran
  4. Iraq
  5. Japan
  6. Jordan
  7. Kazakhstan
  8. South Korea
  9. Kuwait
  1. Kyrgyzstan
  2. Laos
  3. Lebanon
  4. Macau, China
  5. Malaysia
  6. Maldives
  7. Mongolia
  8. Myanmar
  9. Nepal
  1. Oman
  2. Pakistan
  3. Palestine
  4. Philippines
  5. Qatar
  6. Saudi Arabia
  7. Singapore
  8. Sri Lanka
  9. Syria
  1. Chinese Taipei
  2. Tajikistan
  3. Thailand
  4. Timor-Leste
  5. Turkmenistan
  6. United Arab Emirates
  7. Uzbekistan
  8. Vietnam
  9. Yemen

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Guangzhou Asian Games 'one of best ever', says OCA President". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  2. ^ "Political interference alleged". ESPN.com. 5 January 2010. Archived from the original on 13 October 2010. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  3. ^ "Olympic medal for Kuwait under IOC flag". Olympic Council of Asia. 18 August 2010. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  4. ^ Ransom, Ian (11 November 2010). "China set for more shock-and-awe at Asian Games". Reuters. Retrieved 20 January 2011. 
  5. ^ "Macau celebrate first-ever Asian Games gold". The Times of India. 14 November 2010. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  6. ^ "Bangladesh wins first Asian Games gold medal". BBC News. 26 November 2010. Archived from the original on 27 November 2010. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  7. ^ "Badminton – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  8. ^ "Boxing – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  9. ^ "Billiard Sports – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  10. ^ "Fencing – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  11. ^ "Judo – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  12. ^ "Kabaddi – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  13. ^ "Karate – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  14. ^ "Sepaktakraw – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  15. ^ "Soft tennis – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  16. ^ "Squash – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  17. ^ "Table tennis – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  18. ^ "Taekwondo – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  19. ^ "Tennis – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  20. ^ "Wrestling – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  21. ^ "Wushu – Medals Standings". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  22. ^ "Artistic Gymnastics – Men's Floor Final". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  23. ^ "Swimming – Men's 200m Breaststroke Ev.No.35 Final". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  24. ^ "Athletics – Men's Pole Vault Final". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  25. ^ "Bowling – Men's Doubles Squad A". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  26. ^ "Bowling – Men's Doubles Squad B". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  27. ^ "Canoe/Kayak Sprint – Men's Kayak Single 1000m Final". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  28. ^ "Athletics – Women's High Jump Final". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  29. ^ "Athletics – Men's High Jump Final". gz2010.cn. Guangzhou Asian Games Organizing Committee. Retrieved 27 November 2010. 
  30. ^ Ransom, Ian (19 November 2010). "Uzbek stripped of silver medal for doping". Reuters India. Retrieved 19 November 2010. 
  31. ^ Thompson, Dave (20 November 2010). "Two judokas promoted to silver". Reuters India. Retrieved 21 November 2010. 
  32. ^ "More doping failures at 2010 Asian Games". The Straits Times. 24 January 2011. Retrieved 24 January 2011. 
  33. ^ "Vikas Gowda to get Asian Games bronze". The Times of India. 26 January 2011. Retrieved 6 February 2011.