2010 FIBA World Championship Final

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2010 FIBA World Championship Final
1 2 3 4 Total
United States  22 20 19 20 81
Turkey  17 15 16 16 64
Date September 12, 2010
Arena Sinan Erdem Dome
City Istanbul
Attendance 15,000

The 2010 FIBA World Championship Final was a basketball game between the men's national teams of Turkey and the United States that took place on September 12, 2010, at Sinan Erdem Dome in Istanbul, Turkey, to determine the winner of the 2010 FIBA World Championship. The US team won the world title after defeating Turkey 81–64.[1]

This was the first match-up in any major international competition between the United States and Turkey. The last time the two teams faced each other in a match was at an exhibition game before the 2008 Summer Olympics. At that meeting, the U.S. dominated the game and won 114–82,[2] with the Turkish side playing without the services of its star, Hedo Türkoğlu.

Route to the final[edit]

Both teams qualified to the tournament automatically, the U.S. by winning the gold medal at the Olympics in Beijing, and Turkey as hosts.[3] Historically, the teams were polar opposites. America had 16 Summer Olympics medals and 10 FIBA World Championship medals, while Turkey's only previous international medal of any kind was a silver at the EuroBasket 2001. The US brought the top scoring offense into the final, averaging 94.3 points and 18.5 assists per game. Nevertheless, Turkey's vaunted 2-1-2 zone made it the top defensive team (64 points per game) in the tournament heading into the final,[4] and a commentator on NBA.com wrote that the European crowd would "be the most hostile crowd most of these [U.S.] players, with the exception of maybe Chauncey Billups and Lamar Odom, have ever seen."[4]

The U.S. had an easier route to the final, winning all of their games in runaway fashion, with the sole exception of their preliminary round game against Brazil. Turkey, on the other hand, had close games against Puerto Rico in the preliminary round, and against Serbia in the semifinals in which Kerem Tunçeri scored the go-ahead basket with less than a second left after picking up Hedo Türkoğlu's fumble to give Turkey the 83–82 win. Both teams were undefeated going into the final.[3]

Turkey Round USA
Opponent Result Group stage Opponent Result
 Ivory Coast 86–47 Match 1  Croatia 106–78
 Russia 65–56 Match 2  Slovenia 99–77
 Greece 76–65 Match 3  Brazil 70–68
 Puerto Rico 79–77 Match 4  Iran 88–51
 China 87–40 Match 5  Tunisia 92–57
Team Pld W L PF PA PD Pts
Turkey 5 5 0 393 285 +108 10
Russia 5 4 1 365 346 +19 9
Greece 5 3 2 403 370 +33 8
China 5 1 4 360 422 −62 6
Puerto Rico 5 1 4 386 401 −15 6
Côte d'Ivoire 5 1 4 334 417 −83 6
Final standing
Team Pld W L PF PA PD Pts
USA 5 5 0 455 331 +124 10
Slovenia 5 4 1 393 376 +17 9
Brazil 5 3 2 398 354 +44 8
Croatia 5 2 3 395 407 −12 7
Iran 5 1 4 301 367 −66 6
Tunisia 5 0 5 300 407 −107 5
Opponent Result Knockout stage Opponent Result
 France 95–77 Round of 16  Angola 121–66
 Slovenia 95–68 Quarter-finals  Russia 89–79
 Serbia 83–82 Semifinals  Lithuania 89–74

Match details[edit]

September 12
21:30
Turkey  64–81  United States
Scoring by quarter: 17–22, 15–20, 16–19, 16–20
Pts: Türkoğlu 16
Rebs: İlyasova 11
Asts: Tunçeri 5
Pts: Durant 28
Rebs: Odom 11
Asts: Rose 6
Sinan Erdem Dome, Istanbul
Attendance: 15,000
Referees: Cristiano Jesus Maranho (BRA), Luigi Lamonica (ITA), Juan Arteaga (ESP)
Chauncey Billups and Lamar Odom with the trophy

The game was close for the first half—Turkey even led at one point during the first quarter—but the American athleticism was too much for the Turks, and the U.S. was able to pull away on easy baskets.[5]

Kevin Durant was the game's leading scorer with 28 points, including seven three-point field goals. Durant scored 20 of his points in the first half. Lamar Odom came up big when it mattered most, scoring all fifteen of his points in the second half, and grabbing eleven rebounds overall. Hedo Türkoğlu was Turkey's leading scorer with 16 points, despite suffering a knee injury during the first half.[6] Ersan İlyasova had seven points and eleven rebounds.[5]

With the win, Mike Krzyzewski became the first U.S. national basketball coach to win an Olympic Gold Medal and a FIBA World Championship.[5] The U.S. also clinched an automatic berth in the 2012 Olympic tournament.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "USA beat hosts Turkey to land first World Championship title since 1994". The Telegraph. 2010-08-13. Archived from the original on 14 September 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-13. 
  2. ^ "U.S. Olympic basketball team beats Turkey by 32 points". Full Court Press – A Detroit Pistons Blog. 2008-07-31. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  3. ^ a b "Last Day Preview". FIBA. 2010-09-12. Archived from the original on 15 September 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  4. ^ a b "Americans face difficult challenge as Turkey thinks upset". NBA.com. 2010-09-11. Archived from the original on 15 September 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  5. ^ a b c d "FIBA World Championships: USA-Turkey Live Blog". SI.com. 2010-09-12. Archived from the original on 14 September 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-13. 
  6. ^ "FIBA world championship final: USA defeats Turkey". USA Today. September 12, 2010. Retrieved September 12, 2010.