2010 IAAF World Cross Country Championships

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38th World Cross Country Championships
38th World Cross Country Championships
Organisers IAAF
Edition 38th
Date 28 March
Host city Bydgoszcz, Województwo kujawsko-pomorskie, Poland Poland
Location Myślęcinek Park
Nations participating 51
Athletes participating 437
Races 4
Distances 11.611 km – Senior men
7.759 km – Junior men
7.759 km – Senior women
5.833 km – Junior women
Official website 2010 Bydgoszcz[dead link]

The 2010 IAAF World Cross Country Championships were held at Myślęcinek Park in Bydgoszcz, Poland on 28 March 2010. It was the first time in over twenty years that Poland hosted the annual championships, having previously held them in Warsaw in 1987.[1][2] Kenyan runners dominated the competition, taking all four individual titles and all four team titles at the competition.[3] Kenyans took the top four spots in both junior men's and junior women's races to finish with a perfect team score.[4]

In the absence of Zersenay Tadese and Kenenisa Bekele, the senior men's race was an opportunity for less-established runners. Joseph Ebuya won the gold (his first major medal), becoming the first Kenyan to win the men's race since Paul Tergat in 1999. Teklemariam Medhin of Eritrea took second place (also his first major medal) while Moses Ndiema Kipsiro of Uganda was third. Kenya won the senior men's team gold with ease and Eritrea won the team silver medal. Defending champion Gebregziabher Gebremariam only just made the top ten but led Ethiopia to the team bronze.

Florence Kiplagat was not present to defend the women's senior title, leaving Linet Masai and Tirunesh Dibaba as the favourites. However, a sprint finish by little-known runner Emily Chebet rendered Masai the silver medallist for a second year running. Meselech Melkamu of Ethiopia won the fourth World Cross Country bronze of her career as Dibaba finished outside of the medals. Kenya and Ethiopia won the team gold and silver, respectively, while Shalane Flanagan led the United States women's team to a bronze medal.

The top four in both the junior men and women's races were all Kenyan, with Caleb Mwangangi Ndiku and Mercy Cherono the gold medallists. The dominance of the competition by Kenyan and East African runners was accompanied by a decline in the number of European teams that were entered for the tournament, with some historically strong countries sending no athletes at all.

Preparation[edit]

Bidding[edit]

The Bydgoszcz bid for the World Cross Country Championships was approved on 22 March 2009 at the spring IAAF Council meeting.[5]

Qualification[edit]

Athletes could gain qualification into the World Championships through performances at either their national championships or through the following IAAF Permit Meetings:

Pre-championship events[edit]

In order to raise awareness prior to the championships, the city and Polish athletics association organised a weekly cross country run (the Cross Bydgoski) every Sunday on the race course from 25 October onwards. Renowned Polish athletes were invited and Artur Kohutek and Marika Popowicz were among those who took to the course to compete alongside professional and amateur runners alike.[6]

The Polish Cross Country Championships were held at the venue, acting as a pre-championship tester for the Myślęcinek Park course two weeks prior to the main event. Katarzyna Kowalska won the women's 8 km race while Marcin Chabowski won the men's 12 km event.[7] The organising committee introduced an event mascot – a large grey squirrel called "Crossby".[8]

Kenenisa Bekele missed the competition through injury

Pre-race form[edit]

Before the event, the possible medallists of men's race were less predictable than in previous years – Kenenisa Bekele, who had won six long and five short course gold medals in the previous decade, was ruled out due to an injury and his nearest competitor, 2007 winner Zersenay Tadese, missed the championships to focus on road running instead.[9]

Their absence suggested that a Kenyan runner might top the men's podium for the first time in over ten years. The largely untested Paul Tanui had established himself by summarily beating his more experienced counterparts by over half a minute at the Kenyan championships. Leonard Komon and Joseph Ebuya were other Kenyan men in strong form. Many of Ethiopia's top athletes were absent, although the defending champion Gebregziabher Gebremariam was a key medal contender and former junior champion Ayele Abshero was making his first try at the senior ranks. Outside of the traditionally successful Ethiopian and Kenya teams, Samuel Tsegay of Eritrea and 2009 silver medallist Moses Ndiema Kipsiro of Uganda were medal possibilities, while the 2009 European Champion Alemayehu Bezabeh headed an improved Spanish team.[9]

In the women's race, Linet Masai (2009 silver medallist) and Tirunesh Dibaba (the 2008 champion) were strong favourites for the women's medals. The defending champion, Florence Kiplagat, was not in attendance but 2009 fourth placer Lineth Chepkurui was another Kenyan contender for the medals. Ethiopia entered a strong team, including Dibaba, 2003 champion Werknesh Kidane and multiple past medallist Meselech Melkamu. Non-African runners in good form were 2004 champion Benita Willis of Australia and 2009 European champion Hayley Yelling. The United States and Portugal had entered strong women's teams, led by national champions Shalane Flanagan and Ana Dulce Félix respectively, which were given good medalling possibilities.[10]

Competition[edit]

Venue and conditions[edit]

Sign at the entrance of the venue – Myślęcinek Park

The course for the race was flat with a number of turns and was grassy and reasonably dry underfoot. An unusual addition to the relatively straightforward course was the placement of large wooden logs on the course as hurdles. This aspect came under criticism from Jason Henderson of Athletics Weekly, who commented that the course "seems to be some kind of children’s play park, runners also have to run past a bizarre-looking wooden crocodile."[11] A mix of unseasonably warm weather, followed by a cold, overcast day prior to the championships, suggested the event would be held in less than ideal conditions.[11][12] However, the race day itself was sunny and (at 10° Celsius) the temperature was well-suited to the runners.[13]

Men's race[edit]

The men's race started at a middling-pace and 20 runners (mostly Kenyans, Ethiopians and Eritreans) had formed a leading pack by the third lap. Defending champion Gebregziabher Gebremariam was not among them and it soon became obvious he would not reach the podium for a second year running. Samuel Tsegay and Teklemariam Medhin of Eritrea began to increase the pace at the beginning of the fourth lap. This disrupted the pack and by the end of the lap Medhin was leading, shortly followed by Joseph Ebuya and Moses Kipsiro, who was a little further behind. Ebuya took the lead and he continued the quicker pace for the fifth and final lap. Medhin stayed close to Ebuya, however, while Leonard Komon and Kipsiro were battling for the bronze medal position.[13]

As the race drew to a close, Ebuya pulled away from Medhin to beat the Eritrean by six seconds, becoming the first Kenyan senior men's champion since Paul Tergat in 1999. Komon and Kipsiro engaged in a sprint finish in the final straight and, although they recorded the same time, it was Kipsiro who took the honours. Tsegay and Hasan Mahboob took fifth and sixth places and a Kenyan trio of Richard Kipkemboi Mateelong, Paul Tanui, and Hosea Mwok Macharinyang ensured that Kenya took the team gold as well.[13] Eritrea took the team silver medal, pushing Ethiopian into third place on the team podium. Chakir Boujattaoui (in 12th place) helped Morocco to fourth in the rankings while Saudi-Arabian-born runner Simon Bairu, representing Canada, was the first non-African to cross the line.[14]

Later that year, Boujattaoui's performance was erased from the record as he failed a pre-race drug test for MIRCERA (an EPO variant).[15] This meant that Bairu was elevated into the top twelve while Uganda moved ahead of Morocco by one place in the final team rankings.

Women's race[edit]

Linet Masai won the silver for the second year running

Linet Masai, the previous year's silver medallist, made a strong start to the race and began to set the pace for the race alongside her Kenyan teammates. After the first lap around fifteen runners had formed a leading pack comprising mainly Kenyan and Ethiopian runners, although Benita Willis, Shalane Flanagan, and Hilda Kibet remained among them. The group stayed together until the third lap at which point the pace became too much for some runners. By the midpoint of the lap, former champion Tirunesh Dibaba had slipped out of contention and was ten seconds behind the three leading athletes: Masai, Emily Chebet and Meselech Melkamu.[16]

In the final lap, Masai made her move and began to forge a lead over the other two runners. However, Chebet began to chase Masai, leaving Melkamu behind her. Masai was ahead at the final straight towards the finish but Chebet's sprint quickly reduced the gap between the two. The little-known Chebet won at the line, defeating the pre-race favourite Masai, who had to content herself with another silver having lost another sprint finish at the competition. Melkamu took third uncontested while Dibaba was fourth some twelve seconds behind the bronze medallist. Kenyans Lineth Chepkurui and Margaret Wangari Muriuki took fifth and sixth to confirm their team gold and the Ethiopian women took the team silver. American runner Shalane Flanagan was twelfth and top-20 finishes from Molly Huddle and Magdalena Lewy-Boulet helped the United States to a team bronze.[16][17]

Junior races[edit]

The junior men's race was a straight forward affair: a Kenyan trio of Caleb Ndiku, Clement Langat and Japhet Korir monopolised first position for laps one and two. Ndiku took to the front of the leading pack on the third lap and never relinquished his position after maintaining a fast pace. As Ndiku increased his lead, Moses Kibet of Uganda attempted to follow, but he eventually fell off the pace. Langat and Korir pulled closer to their team mate in the final stages but they took second and third place respectively. Isaiah Koech overtook Kibet to head the Kenyan team to a perfect gold, occupying the top four spots.[18] With Ethiopia, Uganda and Eritrea taking the next three team spots, the upper rankings featured almost exclusively East African runners, with Joel Mmone of South Africa (21st place) being the only exception among the first 24 runners to finish.[19]

The junior women's race marked a resounding defeat for the defending Ethiopian team and its defending champion Genzebe Dibaba. The leading pack remained large during the first two laps, but on the third and final lap the Kenyan women asserted themselves. By the halfway point, Mercy Cherono was at the front of a group of four Kenyans comprising Purity Rionoripo, Esther Chemtai and Faith Chepngetich. Cherono pulled ahead of her compatriots and won with ease. Rionoripo just pipped Chemtai for second place in a sprint finish, shortly followed by Chepndetich in fourth place. Dibaba finished in eleventh, helping Ethiopia to the team silver. Uganda took the team bronze while the first non-African-born runner home was Gulshat Fazlitdinova of Russia.[20][21]

Reception[edit]

Having won every gold medal on offer, as well as a 1–2 in the women's race and every junior individual medal, Kenya were perceived as being by far the dominant force of the championships.[3][22] However, while this success was lauded as a great achievement for Kenya by commentators such as former champion John Ngugi,[23] this dominance came with a fall in both interest and participation from Western countries.[24] Nations with distinguished histories in long distance running, such as Russia, Germany and Finland, sent no senior athletes to the championships at all, while the sole runners for Belgium and the Netherlands (Atelaw Yeshetela and Hilda Kibet) were both born in East Africa.[11]

The secretary general of the IAAF, Pierre Weiss, acknowledged the lack of European teams present at the competition, but said that problem was solely with world championships participation and not the sport of cross country running as a whole as the 2009 European Cross Country Championships had been successful. IAAF president Lamine Diack stated that European runners needed to learn from the East Africans to improve their performances.[11] However, the decline in European interest had a direct effect on the scheduling of the world championships event, which had been changed from an annual to a biennial format by a large majority of votes at the 2009 IAAF Congress.[25]

Medallists[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Individual
Senior men
(11.611 km)
Joseph Ebuya
 Kenya
33:00 Teklemariam Medhin
 Eritrea
33:06 Moses Ndiema Kipsiro
 Uganda
33:10
Junior men
(7.759 km)
Caleb Mwangangi Ndiku
 Kenya
22:07 Clement Kiprono Langat
 Kenya
22:09 Japhet Kipyegon Korir
 Kenya
22:12
Senior women
(7.759 km)
Emily Chebet
 Kenya
24:19 Linet Chepkwemoi Masai
 Kenya
24:20 Meselech Melkamu
 Ethiopia
24:26
Junior women
(5.833 km)
Mercy Cherono
 Kenya
18:47 Purity Cherotich Rionoripo
 Kenya
18:54 Esther Chemtai
 Kenya
18:55
Team
Senior men  Kenya 20  Eritrea 46  Ethiopia 69
Junior men  Kenya 10  Ethiopia 32  Uganda 56
Senior women  Kenya 14  Ethiopia 22  United States 76
Junior women  Kenya 10  Ethiopia 30  Uganda 81

Results[edit]

Senior men's race (11.611 km)[edit]

Joseph Ebuya won the gold – the first major medal of his career
Moses Kipsiro made the podium for a second year in a row

Complete results for senior men[26][27] and for senior men's teams[28][29][30] were published.

For full event details see 2010 IAAF World Cross Country Championships – Senior men's race
Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Joseph Ebuya  Kenya 33:00
Silver medal icon.svg Teklemariam Medhin  Eritrea 33:06
Bronze medal icon.svg Moses Ndiema Kipsiro  Uganda 33:10
4 Leonard Patrick Komon  Kenya 33:10
5 Samuel Tsegay  Eritrea 33:27
6 Hasan Mahboob  Bahrain 33:28
7 Richard Kipkemboi Mateelong  Kenya 33:29
8 Paul Kipngetich Tanui  Kenya 33:30
9 Hosea Mwok Macharinyang  Kenya 33:31
10 Gebregziabher Gebremariam  Ethiopia 33:35
11 Ahmad Hassan Abdullah  Qatar 33:36
12 Simon Bairu  Canada 33:42
Full results
  • = Chakir Boujattaoui of Morocco was the original 12th place finisher, but was disqualified for a doping offence.
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  Kenya
Joseph Ebuya 1
Leonard Patrick Komon 4
Richard Kipkemboi Mateelong 7
Paul Kipngetich Tanui 8
(Hosea Mwok Macharinyang) (9)
(Lucas Kimeli Rotich) (18)
20
Silver medal icon.svg  Eritrea
Teklemariam Medhin 2
Samuel Tsegay 5
Kidane Tadasse 14
Kiflom Sium 23
(Tesfayohannes Mesfin) (34)
(Tewelde Estifanos) (38)
44
Bronze medal icon.svg  Ethiopia
Gebregziabher Gebremariam 10
Abera Kuma 16
Hunegnaw Mesfin 19
Azmeraw Bekele 21
(Ayele Abshero) (24)
(Feyisa Lilesa) (25)
66
4  Uganda 87
5  Morocco 110
6  Spain 150
7  Tanzania 159
8  Bahrain 169
Full results
  • = The disqualification of Morocco's Boujattaoui affected the points totals in the team competition, with the main result being that Uganda were moved up to fourth place ahead of Morocco.
  • Note: Athletes in parentheses did not score for the team result.

Senior women's race (7.759 km)[edit]

Meselech Melkamu won her fifth senior individual medal at the competition
Former champion Tirunesh Dibaba had to settle for team silver
Shalane Flanagan (right) headed the United States to a team bronze medal

Complete results for senior women,[31][32] and for senior women's teams[33][34][35] were published.

For full event details see 2010 IAAF World Cross Country Championships – Senior women's race
Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Emily Chebet  Kenya 24:19
Silver medal icon.svg Linet Masai  Kenya 24:20
Bronze medal icon.svg Meselech Melkamu  Ethiopia 24:26
4 Tirunesh Dibaba  Ethiopia 24:38
5 Lineth Chepkurui  Kenya 24:40
6 Margaret Muriuki  Kenya 24:42
7 Feyse Tadese  Ethiopia 25:03
8 Mamitu Daska  Ethiopia 25:03
9 Werknesh Kidane  Ethiopia 25:07
10 Hilda Kibet  Netherlands 25:17
11 Shitaye Eshete  Bahrain 25:20
12 Shalane Flanagan  United States 25:20
Full results
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  Kenya
Emily Chebet 1
Linet Chepkwemoi Masai 2
Lineth Chepkurui 5
Margaret Wangari Muriuki 6
(Hannah Wanjiru Gatheru) (13)
(Gladys Jepkemoi Chemweno) (14)
14
Silver medal icon.svg  Ethiopia
Meselech Melkamu 3
Tirunesh Dibaba 4
Feyse Tadese 7
Mamitu Daska 8
(Werknesh Kidane) (9)
(Abebech Afework) (18)
22
Bronze medal icon.svg  United States
Shalane Flanagan 12
Molly Huddle 19
Magdalena Lewy-Boulet 20
Amy Hastings 25
(Renee Metivier Baillie) (38)
(Emily Brown) (41)
76
4  Morocco 127
5  Portugal 127
6  United Kingdom 140
7  Japan 150
8  Australia 155
Full results
  • Note: Athletes in parentheses did not score for the team result.

Junior men's race (7.759 km)[edit]

Complete for junior men,[36][37] and for junior men's teams[38][39][40] were published.

For full event details see 2010 IAAF World Cross Country Championships – Junior men's race
Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Caleb Mwangangi Ndiku  Kenya 22:07
Silver medal icon.svg Clement Kiprono Langat  Kenya 22:09
Bronze medal icon.svg Japhet Kipyegon Korir  Kenya 22:12
4 Isaiah Kiplangat Koech  Kenya 22:24
5 Moses Kibet  Uganda 22:27
6 Debebe Woldsenbet  Ethiopia 22:28
7 Gashaw Biftu  Ethiopia 22:31
8 Gideon Kipkemoi Kipketer  Kenya 22:33
9 Gebretsadik Abraha  Ethiopia 22:37
10 Belete Assefa  Ethiopia 22:41
11 Charles Kibet Chepkurui  Kenya 22:44
12 Nassir Dawud  Eritrea 22:48
Full results
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  Kenya
Caleb Mwangangi Ndiku 1
Clement Kiprono Langat 2
Japhet Kipyegon Korir 3
Isiah Kiplangat Koech 4
(Gideon Kipkemoi Kipketer) (8)
(Charles Kibet Chepkurui) (11)
10
Silver medal icon.svg  Ethiopia
Debebe Woldsenbet 6
Gashaw Biftu 7
Gebretsadik Abraha 9
Belete Assefa 10
(Yekeber Bayabel) (14)
(Mosinet Geremew) (16)
32
Bronze medal icon.svg  Uganda
Moses Kibet 5
Timothy Toroitich 13
Thomas Ayeko 18
Alex Cherop 20
(Soyekwo Kibet) (24)
56
4  Eritrea 66
5  Morocco 121
6  Japan 133
7  South Africa 157
8  United States 169
Full results
  • Note: Athletes in parentheses did not score for the team result.

Junior women's race (5.833 km)[edit]

Complete results for junior women,[41][42] and for junior women's teams[43][44][45] were published.

For full event details see 2010 IAAF World Cross Country Championships – Junior women's race
Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Mercy Cherono  Kenya 18:47
Silver medal icon.svg Purity Cherotich Rionoripo  Kenya 18:54
Bronze medal icon.svg Esther Chemtai  Kenya 18:55
4 Faith Chepngetich Kipyegon  Kenya 19:02
5 Genet Yalew  Ethiopia 19:03
6 Emebet Anteneh  Ethiopia 19:06
7 Nelly Chebet Ngeiywo  Kenya 19:06
8 Afera Godfay  Ethiopia 19:07
9 Alice Aprot Nawowuna  Kenya 19:14
10 Tejitu Daba  Bahrain 19:14
11 Genzebe Dibaba  Ethiopia 19:21
12 Merima Mohammed  Ethiopia 19:26
Full results
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  Kenya
Mercy Cherono 1
Purity Cherotich Rionoripo 2
Esther Chemtai 3
Faith Chepngetich Kipyegon 4
(Nelly Chebet Ngeiywo) (7)
(Alice Aprot Nawowuna) (9)
10
Silver medal icon.svg  Ethiopia
Genet Yalew 5
Emebet Anteneh 6
Afera Godfay 8
Genzebe Dibaba 11
(Merima Mohammed) (12)
(Waganesh Mekasha) (13)
30
Bronze medal icon.svg  Uganda
Annet Negesa 14
Rebecca Cheptegei 15
Viola Chemos 25
Linet Chebet 27
(Mercy Chelangat) (37)
81
4  Japan 98
5  United Kingdom 105
6  United States 123
7  Algeria 197
8  Canada 202
Full results
  • Note: Athletes in parentheses did not score for the team result.

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Kenya (KEN) 8 3 2 13
2  Ethiopia (ETH) 0 3 2 5
3  Eritrea (ERI) 0 2 0 2
4  Uganda (UGA) 0 0 3 3
5  United States (USA) 0 0 1 0
Total 8 8 8 24
  • Note: Totals include both individual and team medals, with medals in the team competition counting as one medal.

Participation[edit]

According to an unofficial count, 437 athletes from 51 countries participated. This is in agreement with the official numbers as published.[46]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ IAAF Cross Country season 2009 / 2010 begins and ends in Portugal. IAAF (17 November 2009). Retrieved on 2010-02-12.
  2. ^ Ramsak, Bob (7 November 2009). With Bydgoszcz on the horizon, a look back at Poland's distance tradition - IAAF World Cross Country Championships. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  3. ^ a b Kenya control World Cross Country. BBC Sport (28 March 2010). Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  4. ^ Arcoleo, Laura (28 March 2010). Kenyans rule supreme in Bydgoszcz. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-29.
  5. ^ IAAF Council Meeting, Berlin – NEWS BRIEF, Day 2. IAAF (22 March 2009). Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  6. ^ Turner, Chris (5 January 2010). Bydgoszcz braves the cold and takes to its feet to promote 2010 World XC. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-02-12.
  7. ^ Lopatto, Maciej (17 March 2010). Snow and mud awaits in Bydgoszcz - World Cross Country Championships. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-17.
  8. ^ Crossby oficjalnie zaprasza na mistrzostwa (Polish). Bydgoszcz 2010 (4 March 2010). Retrieved on 2010-03-28.
  9. ^ a b Butler, Mark (24 March 2010). Bydgoszcz 2010 - Time for another Paul? Men's Races Preview. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-24.
  10. ^ Johnson, Len (23 March 2010). Bydgoszcz 2010 - Can Dibaba prevent Masai's rise to top spot? - Women's Races Preview. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-24.
  11. ^ a b c d Henderson, Jason (27 March 2010). IAAF hits back at World Cross criticism. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  12. ^ Butler, Mark (27 March 2010). "You don’t want to be working on your tan at the World Cross," Bydgoszcz Press Conference Quotes. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  13. ^ a b c Butler, Mark (28 March 2010). Joseph Ebuya ends Kenyan draught - Men's Senior race report. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  14. ^ Senior Race - M Final. IAAF (28 March 2010). Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  15. ^ Athletes Currently Suspended. IAAF. Retrieved on 2011-01-28.
  16. ^ a b Johnson, Len (28 March 2010). Chebet's strong finish prevails - Women's Senior race report - Bydgoszcz 2010. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  17. ^ Senior Race - W Final. IAAF (28 March 2010). Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  18. ^ Butler, Mark (28 March 2010). Front running pays off for Ndiku - Men's Junior race report - Bydgoszcz 2010. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-29.
  19. ^ Junior Race - M Final. IAAF (28 March 2010). Retrieved on 2010-03-29.
  20. ^ Johnson, Len (28 March 2010). Cherono sets the record straight - Women's Junior race report - Bydgoszcz 2010. IAAF. Retrieved on 2010-03-29.
  21. ^ Junior Race - W Final. IAAF (28 March 2010). Retrieved on 2010-03-29.
  22. ^ Kenya complete World Cross Country whitewash. ESPN. Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  23. ^ Kenya sweeps titles at world cross country. RTÉ (28 March 2010). Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  24. ^ Henderson, Jason. (29 March 2010). Editor's Letter – Eddie’s marathon challenge is no joke. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
  25. ^ 47th IAAF Congress – Day 1. IAAF (12 August 2009). Retrieved on 2010-03-30.
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  42. ^ 38th IAAF World Cross Country Championships - Bydgoszcz - Sunday 28 March 2010 - Junior Race - Women - Results, IAAF, March 28, 2010, retrieved November 5, 2013 
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  46. ^ IAAF WORLD CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIPS - BYDGOSZCZ 2013 - FACTS & FIGURES - SUMMARY OF PAST CHAMPIONSHIPS, IAAF, p. 2, retrieved November 5, 2013 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 53°10′00″N 18°02′19″E / 53.16667°N 18.03861°E / 53.16667; 18.03861