2010 KZ39

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2010 KZ39
2010 KZ39
Las Campanas Observatory follow-up images of 2010 KZ39
Discovery[1]
Discovered by A. Udalski
S. S. Sheppard
M. Szymanski
C. Trujillo
Las Campanas Observatory (304)
Discovery date 2010-05-21
Designations
MPC designation 2010 KZ39
Minor planet category TNO
Detached (SDO-EXT)[2]
Cubewano[3]
Orbital characteristics[2][4]
Epoch September 30, 2012
(Uncertainty=5)[4]
Aphelion 47.6 AU (Q)
Perihelion 42.5 AU (q)
45.0±0.1 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.058±0.04
302 yr
245 ± 3° (M)
Inclination 26.145°±0.008°
53.221°±0.006° (Ω)
320.4 ± 2.6° (ω)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions

≈ 600 km (assuming an albedo of 0.10)[5]

420–940 km[4][6]
20.7[7]
4.0[4]

2010 KZ39, also written as 2010 KZ39, is a trans-Neptunian object with an absolute magnitude of 4.0.[4] Mike Brown's website lists it as a highly likely dwarf planet.[5]

Although more research is needed, it appears to orbit the Sun every 302 years, putting it in the same range as Makemake, Chaos and other objects that circle the Sun in 6:11 resonance to Neptune.

Characteristics[edit]

It has been observed 28 times[3][4] over three oppositions[3] and, as of 2014, is 46.2 AU from the Sun.[7] Using the best-fit values for its orbit, it is expected to come to perihelion in 2109.[4]

Brown assumes an albedo of 0.10, resulting in an estimated diameter of 600 kilometres (370 mi).[5] However, since the albedo is unknown and it has a preliminary absolute magnitude of 4.0,[4] its diameter could easily fall between 420 (albedo: 0.25[8]) and 940 km (albedo: 0.05[8]).[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MPEC 2010-L38 : 2010 KZ39". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2010-06-08. Retrieved 2010-12-03. 
  2. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 10KZ39" (last observation: 2012-03-20 using 28 of 28 observations over 1.83 years). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2011-08-18. 
  3. ^ a b c "2010 KZ39 Orbit". IAU Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2011-08-18. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2010 KZ39)" (last observation: 2012-03-20; arc: 1.83 years). Retrieved 2012-07-22. 
  5. ^ a b c Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2014-04-07. 
  6. ^ a b "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Retrieved 2011-07-19. 
  7. ^ a b "AstDyS: 2010 KZ39 Ephemerides". AstDyS. Retrieved 2014-04-07. 
  8. ^ a b Dan Bruton. "Conversion of Absolute Magnitude to Diameter for Minor Planets". Department of Physics & Astronomy (Stephen F. Austin State University). Archived from the original on 23 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-18. 

External links[edit]