2010 RE64

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2010 RE64
Discovery[1]
Discovered by D. Rabinowitz
M. E. Schwamb
S. Tourtellotte
European Southern Observatory, La Silla (809)
Discovery date 2010-09-09
Designations
MPC designation 2010 RE64
Minor planet category TNO / SDO[2]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 2014-May-23
(Uncertainty=7)
Aphelion 89.1 ± 6.1 AU (Q)
Perihelion 37.1 ± 1.8 AU (q)
63.1 ± 4.3 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.41 ± 0.07
501 ± 52 yr
313.3 ± 8.3° (M)
Inclination 13.530 ± 0.005°
67.53 ± 0.07°
21.4 ± 1°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 370–820 km[3][4]
612 km[5][6]
21.7[7]
4.3[3]

2010 RE64, also written as 2010 RE64, is a scattered disc object with an absolute magnitude of 4.3.[3] Mike Brown's website lists it as a highly likely dwarf planet.[8]

Preliminary[edit]

It has an observation arc of 407 days,[3] and there are currently no known precovery images to help refine its orbit. It is currently 53.7 AU from the Sun.[7] Based on JPL's best-fit solution for the orbit, it reached aphelion around 1829. It is estimated to come to perihelion around 2079.[3]

Assuming a generic trans-Neptunian albedo of 0.09, it is about 612 kilometres (380 mi) in diameter.[5] However, since the true albedo is unknown and it has an absolute magnitude of 4.3,[3] it could easily be from about 370 to 820 km in diameter.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MPEC 2010-T36 : 2010 RE64". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2010-10-06. Retrieved 2011-07-06. 
  2. ^ Marc W. Buie (2011-10-21 using 16 of 16 observations over 1.1 yr). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 10RE64". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-12-03. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2010 RE64)". 2011-10-21 last obs. Retrieved 2014-03-28. 
  4. ^ a b "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Archived from the original on 26 November 2009. Retrieved 2009-12-06. 
  5. ^ a b Dan Bruton. "Conversion of Absolute Magnitude to Diameter for Minor Planets". Department of Physics & Astronomy (Stephen F. Austin State University). Retrieved 2010-12-03. 
  6. ^ Assuming an albedo of 0.09
  7. ^ a b "AstDyS 2010 RE64 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2014-03-28. 
  8. ^ Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2011-08-25. 

External links[edit]