2010 Six Nations Championship

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2010 Six Nations Championship
Date 6 February 2010 – 20 March 2010
Countries  England
 France
 Ireland
 Italy
 Scotland
 Wales
Tournament statistics
Champions  France (17th title)
Grand Slam  France (9th title)
Millennium Trophy  Ireland
Centenary Quaich  Scotland
Giuseppe Garibaldi Trophy  France
Matches played 15
Attendance 1,055,268 (70,351 per match)
Top point scorer(s) Wales Stephen Jones (63)
Top try scorer(s) Ireland Keith Earls (3)
Ireland Tommy Bowe (3)
Wales James Hook (3)
Wales Shane Williams (3)
Player of the tournament Ireland Tommy Bowe
2009 (Previous) (Next) 2011

The 2010 Six Nations Championship, known as the 2010 RBS 6 Nations due to the tournament's sponsorship by the Royal Bank of Scotland, was the 11th series of the Six Nations Championship, an annual rugby union competition between the six major Northern Hemisphere rugby union national teams. The tournament was held between 6 February and 20 March 2010.

The tournament was the 11th in the Six Nations format, after the addition of Italy in 2000. Before then, the competition was known as the Home Nations Championship and the Five Nations. The 2010 Six Nations Championship was the 116th Northern Hemisphere rugby union championship.

The championship was contested by England, France, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. France won the tournament, achieving a final 12–10 victory over England to win the Grand Slam, their first since 2004 and ninth overall (including six in the Five Nations).[1][2] This was also their seventeenth outright victory, including twelve victories in the Five Nations, excluding eight titles shared with other countries. France also retained the Giuseppe Garibaldi Trophy by defeating Italy in the tournament, to whom they had (then) never lost within the Six Nations.

Ireland, 2009 Grand Slam winners, came second with three victories and two defeats. Despite defeating England and Wales, Ireland failed to win the Triple Crown after a 23–20 defeat to Scotland in their final match.[3] England and Wales came third and fourth respectively with two victories each, while Scotland and Italy finished in fifth and sixth positions for the third tournament in a row. Both teams achieved just one victory each, with Scotland also recording a draw in the Calcutta Cup match against England to place ahead of Italy.

Summary[edit]

Scrum between Scotland, left, and France, right, 7 February 2010. France won the match 18–9.
Line-out between England, in white, and Italy, in blue, 14 February 2010. England won the match 17–12.

The reigning champions on entering the 2009 tournament were Ireland, who won the Grand Slam and Triple Crown in 2009.

Ireland did not win the Triple Crown in 2010 due to a surprise 23–20 loss to Scotland in the final Six Nations match at Croke Park on 20 March, with Scotland avoiding their third "wooden spoon" since 2004 in the process. Brian O'Driscoll had opened the scoring in the 11th minute and Ireland were level with Scotland in the 64th minute after Tommy Bowe scored a try, with substitute Ronan O'Gara converting. Scotland's Johnnie Beattie scored his team's first try since they played Wales in their second game and Dan Parks scored a penalty in the final minute to prevent Ireland winning the Triple Crown.[4] Ireland coach Declan Kidney described it as "not our greatest day".[5]

Ireland's previous match – a 27–12 victory over Wales on 13 March – had seen O'Driscoll achieve 100 caps for his country.[6] Ireland's previous match against England had seen John Hayes achieve 100 caps for his country, the first player to do so for Ireland.[7][8]

Ireland's loss to Scotland meant France had won the Championship but could still achieve the Grand Slam by beating England in their final game at the Stade de France on 20 March.[9] The Grand Slam was achieved by France following a 12–10 victory in this game. It was France's first Grand Slam since 2004.[10] England scored the only try of the game.[11] Jonny Wilkinson was not included in the England starting team for only the third time in his career.[12][13] Bryce Lawrence from New Zealand refereed the game.[14]

The nominations for "Player of the Championship" were announced on 17 March; these were Tommy Bowe (Ireland), Mathieu Bastareaud, Morgan Parra, Thierry Dusautoir, Imanol Harinordoquy (all France) and Shane Williams (Wales). Ireland captain Brian O'Driscoll, who had won the award in three of the four previous seasons, was not included this time.[15] Tommy Bowe was named as the player of the championship on 25 March, having polled nearly 50% of the fan votes.[16]

Participants[edit]

The teams involved were:

Nation Home stadium City Head coach Captain
 England Twickenham London Martin Johnson Steve Borthwick/Lewis Moody
 France Stade de France Saint-Denis Marc Lièvremont Thierry Dusautoir
 Ireland Croke Park[N 1] Dublin Declan Kidney Brian O'Driscoll
 Italy Stadio Flaminio Rome Nick Mallett Leonardo Ghiraldini[N 2]
 Scotland Murrayfield Edinburgh Andy Robinson Mike Blair/Chris Cusiter
 Wales Millennium Stadium Cardiff Warren Gatland Ryan Jones
  1. ^ The Aviva Stadium (replacing Lansdowne Road) did not open until May 2010, following the redevelopment of the site.
  2. ^ Italy's normal captain, Sergio Parisse, was ruled out of the 2010 Six Nations due to a torn ACL suffered in a training session during the November 2009 test series.[17]

Squads[edit]

For each nation's squad for the 2010 Six Nations Championship, see 2010 Six Nations Championship squads.

Table[edit]

Position Nation Games Points Table
points
Played Won Drawn Lost For Against Difference Tries
1  France 5 5 0 0 135 69 +66 13 10
2  Ireland 5 3 0 2 106 95 +11 11 6
3  England 5 2 1 2 88 76 +12 6 5
4  Wales 5 2 0 3 113 117 −4 10 4
5  Scotland 5 1 1 3 83 100 −17 3 3
6  Italy 5 1 0 4 69 137 −68 5 2

Fixtures and results[edit]

The schedule for the 2010 Championship was released on 2 April 2009.[18] Following the success of the tournament's first Friday night game, between France and Wales in the 2009 Championship, the organisers scheduled the reverse fixture to also be played on a Friday night.[19]

'c' and 'm' following a try denote 'converted' and 'missed conversion' respectively.

Week 1[edit]

6 February 2010
14:30 GMT
Ireland  29 – 11  Italy
Try: Heaslip 15' c
O'Leary 35' c
Con: O'Gara (2/2)
Pen: O'Gara (4/4) 9', 27', 32', 46'
P. Wallace (1/1) 67'
Report Try: Robertson 39' m
Pen: Gower (1/1) 26'
Mi. Bergamasco (1/1) 44'
Croke Park, Dublin
Attendance: 77,686
Referee: Romain Poîte (France)

6 February 2010
17:00 GMT
England  30 – 17  Wales
Try: Haskell (2) 40' c, 75' c
Care 44' c
Con: Wilkinson (3/3)
Pen: Wilkinson (3/3) 11', 35', 79'
Report Try: A. Jones 49' c
Hook 71' c
Con: S. Jones (2/2)
Pen: S. Jones (1/2) 27'
Twickenham, London
Attendance: 81,406
Referee: Alain Rolland (Ireland)
  • England wore a special kit to celebrate the centenary of the first international match – England v Wales – at Twickenham Stadium.[20]

7 February 2010
15:00 GMT
Scotland  9 – 18  France
Pen: Paterson (3/3) 9', 30', 52'
Report Try: Bastareaud (2) 14' m, 33' c
Con: Parra (1/2)
Pen: Parra (2/3) 28', 44'
Murrayfield, Edinburgh
Attendance: 65,687
Referee: Nigel Owens (Wales)

Week 2[edit]

13 February 2010
14:00 GMT
Wales  31 – 24  Scotland
Try: Byrne 56' m
Halfpenny 77' c
S. Williams 80+1' c
Con: S. Jones (2/3)
Pen: S. Jones (4/5) 15', 23', 39', 79'
Report Try: Barclay 9' c
M. Evans 20' m
Con: Paterson (1/2)
Pen: Parks (2/2) 26', 41'
Drop: Parks (2/4) 18', 66'
Millennium Stadium, Cardiff
Attendance: 74,133
Referee: George Clancy (Ireland)
  • Chris Paterson became the 13th player in history with at least 100 international appearances. His missed conversion ended a personal streak of 35 consecutive successful kicks at goal in the Six Nations, dating back to 2007.[21] This is one of the most dramatic matches of six nations history. Wales came back from 0-10,3-15 and 9-21 down to win the match.

13 February 2010
16:30 GMT
France  33 – 10  Ireland
Try: Servat 27' c
Jauzion 31' c
Poitrenaud 59' c
Con: Parra (3/3)
Pen: Parra (2/3) 17', 68'
Drop: Parra (1/1) 62'
Michalak (1/1) 78'
Report Try: D. Wallace 64' c
Con: O'Gara (1/1)
Pen: O'Gara (1/1) 29'
Stade de France, Saint-Denis
Attendance: 79,289
Referee: Wayne Barnes (England)

14 February 2010
14:30 GMT
Italy  12 – 17  England
Pen: Mi. Bergamasco (4/5)
Report Try: Tait 44' m
Pen: Wilkinson (3/5)
Drop: Wilkinson (1/1) 74'
Stadio Flaminio, Rome
Attendance: 31,876
Referee: Christophe Berdos (France)
  • Jonny Wilkinson's two missed penalties ended a personal streak of consecutive successful penalty kicks in any international which he has started, dating back to 2003.[22]

Week 3[edit]

26 February 2010
20:00 GMT
Wales  20 – 26  France
Try: Halfpenny 62' c
S. Williams 79' c
Con: S. Jones (2/2)
Pen: S. Jones (2/2) 45', 49'
Report Try: Palisson 6' c
Trinh-Duc 40' c
Con: Parra (2/2)
Pen: Parra (3/3) 19', 26', 78'
Michalak (1/1) 71'

27 February 2010
13:30 GMT
Italy  16 – 12  Scotland
Try: Canavosio 64' c
Con: Mi. Bergamasco (1/1)
Pen: Mi. Bergamasco (3/3) 10', 14', 43'
Report Pen: Parks (3/4) 22', 33', 64'
Drop: Parks 49'
Stadio Flaminio, Rome
Attendance: 32,000
Referee: Dave Pearson (England)

27 February 2010
16:00 GMT
England  16 – 20  Ireland
Try: Cole 61' c
Con: Wilkinson (1/1)
Pen: Wilkinson (2/5) 15', 36'
Drop: Wilkinson (1/3) 70'
Report Try: Bowe (2) 4' m, 75' c
Earls 56' m
Con: O'Gara (1/1)
Pen: Sexton (1/3) 29'
Twickenham, London
Attendance: 81,554
Referee: Mark Lawrence (South Africa)
  • John Hayes of Ireland became the first Irish player to earn 100 international caps for his country.[23]

Week 4[edit]

13 March 2010
14:30 GMT
Ireland  27 – 12  Wales
Try: Earls (2) 27' m, 60' m
O'Leary 31' m
Pen: Sexton (3/4) 16', 21', 50'
Drop: Sexton (1/1) 76'
Report Pen: S. Jones (4/5) 9', 38', 54', 63'
Croke Park, Dublin
Attendance: 81,340
Referee: Craig Joubert (South Africa)
  • Ireland captain Brian O'Driscoll became the second Irishman to reach 100 caps for his country.[24]

13 March 2010
17:00 GMT
Scotland  15 – 15  England
Pen: Parks (4/6) 6', 18', 50', 68'
Drop: Parks (1/2) 39'
Report Pen: Wilkinson (3/3) 14', 30', 41'
Flood (2/4) 49', 64'
Murrayfield, Edinburgh
Attendance: 66,891
Referee: Marius Jonker (South Africa)

14 March 2010
14:30 GMT
France  46 – 20  Italy
Try: Harinordoquy 5' c
Marty (2) 17' c, 25' m
Andreu 51' c
Jauzion 56' c
Lapandry 65' c
Con: Parra (5/6)
Pen: Parra (2/3) 10', 41'
Report Try: Del Fava 68' c
Canavosio 72' c
Con: Mi. Bergamasco (2/2)
Pen: Mi. Bergamasco (2/2) 35', 44'
Stade de France, Saint-Denis
Attendance: 78,712
Referee: Alan Lewis (Ireland)

Week 5[edit]

20 March 2010
14:30 GMT
Wales  33 – 10  Italy
Try: Hook (2) 52' c, 57' c
S. Williams 68' c
Con: S. Jones (3/3)
Pen: S. Jones (4/4) 8', 22', 33', 36'
Report Try: McLean 75' c
Con: Mi. Bergamasco (1/1) 75'
Pen: Mi. Bergamasco (1/2) 65'
Millennium Stadium, Cardiff
Attendance: 70,548
Referee: Wayne Barnes (England)
  • Tom Prydie was named to Wales' starting XV on the wing and became the youngest Test cap in Wales history, at age 18 years, 25 days.[25]

20 March 2010
17:00 GMT
Ireland  20 – 23  Scotland
Try: O'Driscoll 11' c
Bowe 64' c
Con: Sexton (1/1)
O'Gara (1/1)
Pen: Sexton (1/3) 51'
O'Gara (1/1) 76'
Report Try: Beattie 15' m
Pen: Parks (5/6) 5', 37', 46', 73', 78'
Drop: Parks (1/2) 40'+1'
Croke Park, Dublin
Attendance: 80,313
Referee: Jonathan Kaplan (South Africa)

20 March 2010
19:45 GMT
France  12 – 10  England
Pen: Parra (3/4) 19', 25', 35'
Drop: Trinh-Duc (1/1) 3'
Report Try: Foden 6' c
Con: Flood (1/1)
Pen: Wilkinson (1/1) 67'
Stade de France, Saint-Denis
Attendance: 80,066
Referee: Bryce Lawrence (New Zealand)

Top scorers[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ackford, Paul (20 March 2010). "France 12 England 10: match report". Telegraph (London). Archived from the original on 23 March 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  2. ^ Jones, Stephen (20 March 2010). "France 12 England 10". The Times (London). Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  3. ^ O'Reilly, Peter (20 March 2010). "Ireland 20 Scotland 23". The Times (London). Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  4. ^ "Scots dash Ireland's Triple Crown dream". RTÉ Sport. 20 March 2010. Archived from the original on 23 March 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  5. ^ "'Not our greatest day' – Declan Kidney". RTÉ Sport. 20 March 2010. Archived from the original on 25 March 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  6. ^ "Ireland 27–12 Wales". RTÉ Sport. 13 March 2010. Archived from the original on 17 March 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  7. ^ "John Hayes expects huge English challenge". RTÉ Sport. 25 February 2010. Archived from the original on 8 April 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  8. ^ Mairs, Gavin (25 February 2010). "Six Nations 2010: John Hayes looks beyond century of Ireland caps to World Cup". The Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  9. ^ Bolton, Paul (21 March 2010). "Six Nations 2010: England's Martin Johnson questions referee after defeat to France". The Daily Telegraph (London). Archived from the original on 24 March 2010. Retrieved 21 March 2010. 
  10. ^ "France crowned Six Nations champions". RTÉ Sport. 20 March 2010. Archived from the original on 24 March 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  11. ^ Jones, Stephen (21 March 2010). "Pressure grows on Rob Andrew despite improved display". The Sunday Times (London). Retrieved 21 March 2010. 
  12. ^ "Jonny Wilkinson dropped by England". RTÉ Sport. 17 March 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  13. ^ Kitson, Robert (18 March 2010). "Martin Johnson drops Jonny Wilkinson from England team to play France". The Guardian (London). Archived from the original on 23 March 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  14. ^ Davis, Toby (20 March 2010). "UPDATE 1-Rugby-Nations-France 12 England 10 – result". Reuters. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  15. ^ "Tommy Bowe nominated for player of 6 Nations". RTÉ Sport. 17 March 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  16. ^ "Ireland's Tommy Bowe is named player of Six Nations". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 25 March 2010. Archived from the original on 26 March 2010. Retrieved 26 March 2010. 
  17. ^ "Sergio Parisse ruled out of Italy's Six Nations campaign after injury". guardian.co.uk (London: Guardian News and Media). 27 November 2009. Retrieved 5 January 2010. 
  18. ^ "RBS Six Nations Fixtures and Results". rbs6nations.com. Six Nations Rugby. Retrieved 26 February 2010. 
  19. ^ "Wales host France in Friday clash". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 2 April 2009. Retrieved 26 February 2010. 
  20. ^ Evans, Jonathan (3 February 2010). "England strip back to good old days (when they won)". Western Mail (Media Wales). Archived from the original on 9 February 2010. Retrieved 26 February 2010. 
  21. ^ Scrum.com
  22. ^ "Six Nations – Italy v England as it happened". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 14 February 2010. Retrieved 27 February 2010. 
  23. ^ "Ireland players and coaches dedicate win to John Hayes". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 27 February 2010. Retrieved 2 March 2010. 
  24. ^ Sportsbeat (13 March 2010). "O'Leary inspires Ireland victory over Wales". RBS 6 Nations. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
  25. ^ "Tom Prydie to become Wales' youngest Test player". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 16 March 2010. Archived from the original on 17 March 2010. Retrieved 17 March 2010. 

External links[edit]