2010 U.S. Open (golf)

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2010 U.S. Open
2010USOpenLogo.svg
Tournament information
Dates June 17–20, 2010
Location Pebble Beach, California
Course(s) Pebble Beach Golf Links
Tour(s) PGA Tour
European Tour
Japan Golf Tour
Statistics
Par 71
Length 7,040 yards (6,437 m)[1][2]
Field 156, 83 after cut
Cut 149 (+7)
Prize fund $7,500,000
6,244,277
Winner's share $1,350,000
€1,123,970[3]
Champion
Northern Ireland Graeme McDowell
284 (Even)
Pebble Beach Golf Links is located in United States
Pebble Beach Golf Links
Pebble Beach Golf Links
Location in the United States

The 2010 United States Open Championship was the 110th U.S. Open, held June 17–20 in Pebble Beach, California. This was the fifth U.S. Open to be played at Pebble Beach Golf Links (2000, 1992, 1982, 1972). Graeme McDowell won his only major title, one stroke ahead of runner-up Grégory Havret.[4] McDowell, from Northern Ireland, was the first European to win the U.S. Open in forty years, since Tony Jacklin of England won in 1970.[5]

Course layout[edit]

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total[1][6]
Yards 380 502 404 331 195 523 109 428 505 3,377 495 390 202 445 580 397 403 208 543 3,663 7,040
Par 4 4 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 35 4 4 3 4 5 4 4 3 5 36 71

Previous course lengths for major championships

Prior to 2000, the 2nd hole was played as a par-5.

Field[edit]

About half the field each year consisted of players who are fully exempt from qualifying for the U.S. Open. The players who qualified for the 2010 U.S. Open are listed below. Each player was classified according to the first category in which he qualified, but other categories are shown in parentheses.[7]

1. Last 10 U.S. Open Champions
Ángel Cabrera (3,9,10,17), Michael Campbell, Jim Furyk (9,10,12,13,17), Lucas Glover (8,9,10,17), Retief Goosen (9,10,17), Geoff Ogilvy (9,10,11,17), Tiger Woods (4,5,8,9,10,13,17)

2. Top two finishers in the 2009 U.S. Amateur
An Byeong-hun (a), Ben Martin (a)

3. Last five Masters Champions
Trevor Immelman, Zach Johnson (9,10,17), Phil Mickelson (5,8,9,10,12,13,17)

4. Last five British Open Champions
Stewart Cink (9,10,17), Pádraig Harrington (5,9,10,11,17)

5. Last five PGA Champions
Y.E. Yang (9,10,17)

6. Last three Players Champions
Tim Clark (9,12,17), Sergio García (8,11,17), Henrik Stenson (8,17)

7. The U.S. Senior Open Champion
Fred Funk

8. Top 15 finishers and ties in the 2009 U.S. Open
Stephen Ames, Ricky Barnes, Matt Bettencourt, David Duval, Ross Fisher (11,17), Søren Hansen, Rory McIlroy (11,12,17), Hunter Mahan (9,10,17), Ryan Moore, Mike Weir (9,10)

9. Top 30 leaders on the 2009 PGA Tour official money list
Paul Casey (11,14,17), Brian Gay (10), Dustin Johnson (10,12,17), Jerry Kelly (10), Matt Kuchar (12,17), Justin Leonard, Kevin Na (10,17), Sean O'Hair (10,17), Kenny Perry (10,17), Ian Poulter (11,14,17), John Rollins, Rory Sabbatini, John Senden (10), Steve Stricker (10,12,13,17), David Toms (10), Nick Watney (10,17)

10. All players qualifying for the 2009 edition of The Tour Championship
Luke Donald (17), Jason Dufner, Ernie Els (11,12,13,14,17), Marc Leishman, Steve Marino, Heath Slocum, Scott Verplank

11. Top 15 on the 2009 European Tour Race to Dubai
Simon Dyson, Martin Kaymer (17), Søren Kjeldsen, Ross McGowan, Francesco Molinari (17), Lee Westwood (14,17), Oliver Wilson (17)

12. Top 10 on the 2010 PGA Tour official money list through May 24, 2010 (the HP Byron Nelson Championship)
Robert Allenby (17), Camilo Villegas (17)
(Anthony Kim (17) did not play after undergoing thumb surgery.[8])

13. Winners of multiple PGA Tour events between the end of the 2009 U.S. Open and the start of the 2010 U.S. Open

14. Top 5 from the 2010 European Tour Race to Dubai through May 24, 2010 (the BMW PGA Championship)
Charl Schwartzel (17)

15. Top 2 on the 2009 Japan Golf Tour official money list, provided they are within the top 75 point leaders of the Official World Golf Rankings at the end of 2009
Yuta Ikeda (17), Ryo Ishikawa (17)

16. Top 2 on the 2009 PGA Tour of Australasia official money list, provided they are within the top 75 point leaders of the Official World Golf Rankings at the end of 2009
Michael Sim (17) (Alistair Presnell, ranked 376th, did not qualify)

17. Top 50 on the Official World Golf Rankings list as of May 24, 2010
K.J. Choi, Ben Crane, Peter Hanson, Miguel Ángel Jiménez, Robert Karlsson, Graeme McDowell, Edoardo Molinari, Louis Oosthuizen, Álvaro Quirós, Adam Scott, Thongchai Jaidee

18. Special exemptions selected by the USGA
Vijay Singh,[9] Tom Watson[10]

Sectional qualifiers
Europe: Gary Boyd, Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Rhys Davies, Rafael Echenique, Grégory Havret, Mikko Ilonen, Rikard Karlberg, Jean-François Lucquin, Pablo Martín, Gareth Maybin, James Morrison
Japan: Hiroyuki Fujita, Paul Sheehan, Toru Taniguchi, Kaname Yokoo
U.S.: Stephen Allan, Jason Allred (L), Stuart Appleby, Arjun Atwal, Eric Axley, Aaron Baddeley, Rich Barcelo, Craig Barlow, Bennett Blakeman (a,L), Joseph Bramlett (a,L), Alex Čejka, Erik Compton (L), Jon Curran (L), Ben Curtis, Brian Davis, Brendon de Jonge, Kent Eger (L), Bob Estes, Harrison Frazar, David Frost, Bobby Gates, Jason Gore, Paul Goydos, Mathias Grönberg, Travis Hampshire (L), Russell Henley (a,L), J. J. Henry, Jim Herman, Morgan Hoffmann (a), Kent Jones, Erick Justesen (L), Kenny Kim (L), Derek Lamely, Scott Langley (a,L), Tom Lehman, Hugo Leon (L), Davis Love III, John Mallinger, Alex Martin (a,L), Dan McCarthy (L), Shaun Micheel, Noh Seung-yul, Deane Pappas, Blaine Peffley (L), Kevin Phelan (a,L), Terry Pilkadaris, Jason Preeo (L), Andrew Putnam (a,L), Matthew Richardson (L), Mark Silvers (L), Jerry Smith (L), Brandt Snedeker, Chris Stroud, Daniel Summerhays (L), Hudson Swafford (a,L), Ty Tryon (L), Bo Van Pelt, Charles Warren, Steve Wheatcroft, Gary Woodland

Alternates
Note: alternates are drawn from the sectional qualifiers.

  1. Azuma Yano – replaced Anthony Kim (thumb surgery).[8]
  2. Simon Khan – took spot reserved for the Memorial Tournament winner. If the Memorial had been the winner's second PGA Tour victory in the year preceding the U.S. Open, that golfer would have received a U.S. Open invitation. However, since the Memorial was Justin Rose's first career PGA Tour win, that left a spot available for another golfer.[11]
  3. Rocco Mediate – took spot reserved for the winner of the St. Jude Classic, for the same reason as noted above with respect to the Memorial Tournament. However, since St. Jude Classic winner Lee Westwood was already qualified for the U.S. Open by three different criteria, that spot was also available for another golfer.[12]
  • (a) denotes amateur
  • (L) denotes player advanced through local qualifying

Past champions in the field[edit]

Made the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Finish
Ernie Els  South Africa 1994, 1997 73 68 72 73 286 +2 3
Tiger Woods  United States 2000, 2002, 2008 74 72 66 75 287 +3 T4
Jim Furyk  United States 2003 72 75 74 71 292 +8 T16
Ángel Cabrera  Argentina 2007 75 72 74 72 293 +9 T22
Tom Watson  United States 1982 78 71 70 76 295 +11 T29
Lucas Glover  United States 2009 73 73 77 76 299 +15 T58
Retief Goosen  South Africa 2001, 2004 75 74 76 74 299

Missed the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 Total To par
Geoff Ogilvy  Australia 2006 79 71 150 +8
Michael Campbell  New Zealand 2005 78 83 161 +19

Summary of rounds of play[edit]

First round[edit]

Thursday, June 17, 2010

The 110th U.S. Open began on a sunny cool day on the Monterey Peninsula. Phil Mickelson a heavy favorite going into the tournament struggled to a 75 (+4). Paul Casey, Shaun Micheel, and Brendon de Jonge all shot a 69 (–2) to lead after 18 holes. De Jonge holed out for eagle at the very difficult par-5 14th hole. The 2009 and 2010 AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am winner Dustin Johnson shot an even par 71. Rafael Cabrera-Bello, K. J. Choi, Alex Čejka, Ryo Ishikawa, Mike Weir, and Ian Poulter all shot 70 (–1). Tiger Woods, who won the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach by 15 strokes in 2000, shot a birdie-free 74 (+3). This was the first time in over seven years, since the first round of the 2003 Masters, where neither Woods nor Mickelson made a birdie in a round of a major championship.[13]

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Paul Casey  England 69 –2
Brendon de Jonge  Zimbabwe 69
Shaun Micheel  United States 69
T4 Rafael Cabrera-Bello  Spain 70 –1
Alex Čejka  Germany 70
K. J. Choi  South Korea 70
Ryo Ishikawa  Japan 70
Ian Poulter  England 70
Mike Weir  Canada 70
T10 Luke Donald  England 71 E
Dustin Johnson  United States 71
Graeme McDowell  Northern Ireland 71
David Toms  United States 71

Second round[edit]

Friday, June 18, 2010

McDowell shot a 68 (–3) to take the 36-hole lead at 142 (–3). Casey posted a 73 (+2) to move back to even par, as did de Jonge. Shaun Micheel shot a 77 (+6), with a double-hit on a chip shot on the first hole. Woods continued to struggle, with a 72 (+1) for 146 (+4). Among those at 141 (–1) were Ernie Els, Johnson, Ishikawa, and Mickelson. Mickelson shot 66 (–5) with a front nine charge with birdies at 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8. Notable players who missed the cut were Rory McIlroy, Hunter Mahan, and two-time heart transplant survivor Erik Compton, who was playing in his first major.[14]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Graeme McDowell  Northern Ireland 71-68=139 –3
T2 Ernie Els  South Africa 73-68=141 –1
Ryo Ishikawa  Japan 70-71=141
Dustin Johnson  United States 71-70=141
Phil Mickelson  United States 75-66=141
T6 Paul Casey  England 69-73=142 E
Alex Čejka  Germany 70-72=142
Brendon de Jonge  Zimbabwe 69-73=142
Jerry Kelly  United States 72-70=142
T10 K. J. Choi  South Korea 70-73=143 +1
Søren Kjeldsen  Denmark 72-71=143
Ian Poulter  England 70-73=143

Third round[edit]

Saturday, June 19, 2010

Johnson stormed to five-under 66 for a 207 (–6) and a three shot lead over McDowell at 210. Johnson eagled the drivable fourth hole to go with birdies on 17 and 18. Woods shot a back nine 31, with birdies on the last three holes the get back in contention at 212 (–1). Both Grégory Havret and Els finished at even par, six shots back of Johnson. Mickelson double bogeyed the 9th hole and struggled to a 73 (+2).[15]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Dustin Johnson  United States 71-70-66=207 –6
2 Graeme McDowell  Northern Ireland 71-68-71=210 –3
3 Tiger Woods  United States 74-72-66=212 –1
T4 Ernie Els  South Africa 73-68-72=213 E
Grégory Havret  France 73-71-69=213
6 Phil Mickelson  United States 75-66-73=214 +1
T7 Alex Čejka  Germany 70-72-74=216 +3
Tim Clark  South Africa 72-72-72=216
Ryo Ishikawa  Japan 70-71-75=216
T10 Martin Kaymer  Germany 74-71-72=217 +4
Davis Love III  United States 75-74-68=217
Sean O'Hair  United States 76-71-70=217

Final round[edit]

Sunday, June 20, 2010

Overnight leader Johnson quickly dropped out of contention with a triple-bogey on the second hole and a double on the third hole. Els was tied for the lead at a part of the round, but fell back eventually. Havret remained closely in contention, but McDowell ground out a round of 74 to win his first major championship.[16]

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
1 Graeme McDowell  Northern Ireland 71-68-71-74=284 E 1,350,000
2 Grégory Havret  France 73-71-69-72=285 +1 810,000
3 Ernie Els  South Africa 73-68-72-73=286 +2 480,687
T4 Phil Mickelson  United States 75-66-73-73=287 +3 303,119
Tiger Woods  United States 74-72-66-75=287
T6 Matt Kuchar  United States 74-72-74-68=288 +4 228,255
Davis Love III  United States 75-74-68-71=288
T8 Alex Čejka  Germany 70-72-74-73=289 +5 177,534
Dustin Johnson  United States 71-70-66-82=289
Martin Kaymer  Germany 74-71-72-72=289
Brandt Snedeker  United States 75-74-69-71=289
  • Amateurs: Henley (+8), Langley (+8)

Source:[2]

Scorecard[edit]

Final round

Hole  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 4 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 5 4 4 3 5
Northern Ireland McDowell –3 –3 –3 –3 –4 –4 –4 –4 –3 –2 –2 –2 –2 –1 –1 –1 E E
France Havret –1 –1 –1 –1 –1 –2 –2 –1 –1 E E E E E E E +1 +1
South Africa Els E –1 –1 –2 –2 –3 –3 –3 –2 E +1 E E +1 +1 +1 +2 +2
United States Mickelson E E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3
United States Woods E E E +1 +1 +2 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3
United States Johnson –6 –3 –1 E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +5 +5

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par
Source:[17][18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2010 U.S. Open Championship: Course". Majors Championships (PGA & PGA Tour). Retrieved June 9, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Open Championship: 2010 final leaderboard". ESPN. June 20, 2010. Retrieved June 3, 2012. 
  3. ^ "2010 U.S. Open: final leaderboard". European Tour. June 20, 2010. Retrieved June 9, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Graeme McDowell: My career is off and running after US Open triumph". The Telegraph (London). June 21, 2010. Archived from the original on June 24, 2010. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  5. ^ DiMeglio, Steve (June 20, 2010). "Graeme McDowell holds off challengers to win U.S. Open". USA Today. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  6. ^ "2010 U.S. Open Championship". European Tour. Retrieved June 9, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Entry Form, 110th U.S. Open Golf Championship" (PDF). United States Golf Association. Retrieved March 21, 2010. 
  8. ^ a b Injured Allenby could be buddy J. Lyle's only chance to play
  9. ^ Singh avoids U.S. Open qualifying, gets exemption
  10. ^ Tom Watson accepts special exemption into 2010 U.S. Open
  11. ^ England's Khan gets into U.S. Open thanks to Rose
  12. ^ Mediate earns alternate spot in U.S. Open field
  13. ^ Hodgetts, Rob (June 18, 2010). "US Open: Paul Casey ties for lead at Pebble Beach". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on June 21, 2010. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  14. ^ Hodgetts, Rob (June 18, 2010). "US Open: Graeme McDowell leads as Phil Mickelson surges". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on June 21, 2010. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  15. ^ Hodgetts, Rob (June 19, 2010). "US Open: Tiger Woods surges as Dustin Johnson leads". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on June 20, 2010. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  16. ^ "Graeme McDowell toasts US Open triumph at Pebble Beach". BBC Sport. June 20, 2010. Archived from the original on June 21, 2010. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  17. ^ "2010 U.S. Open leaderboard". Yahoo! Sports. June 20, 2010. Retrieved May 24, 2013. 
  18. ^ "2010 U.S. Open leaderboard". ESPN. June 20, 2010. Retrieved May 24, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2010 Masters
Major Championships Succeeded by
2010 Open Championship

Coordinates: 36°34′05″N 121°57′00″W / 36.568°N 121.950°W / 36.568; -121.950