2010 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 2010 throughout the world.  

Champions[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

  • Regular Season Champions
League Eastern Division Champions Central Division Champions Western Division Champions Wild Card Qualifier
American League Tampa Bay Rays Minnesota Twins Texas Rangers New York Yankees
National League Philadelphia Phillies Cincinnati Reds San Francisco Giants Atlanta Braves
  Division Series
TV: TBS
League Championship Series
TV: TBS (ALCS);
FOX (NLCS)
World Series
TV: FOX
                           
  1  Tampa Bay Rays 2  
3  Texas Rangers 3  
  3  Texas Rangers 4  
American League
  4  New York Yankees 2  
2  Minnesota Twins 0
  4  New York Yankees 3  
    AL  Texas Rangers 1
  NL  San Francisco Giants 4
  1  Philadelphia Phillies 3  
3  Cincinnati Reds 0  
  1  Philadelphia Phillies 2
National League
  2  San Francisco Giants 4  
2  San Francisco Giants 3
  4  Atlanta Braves 1  

Click on any series score to link to that series' page.
Higher seed had home field advantage during Division Series and League Championship Series.
The National League champion has home field advantage during the World Series as a result of the NL victory in the All-Star Game.

Other Champions[edit]

Calendar[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

December

  • December 4–7: Baseball winter meetings, Lake Buena Vista, Florida.
  • December 12: Last day for teams to offer 2011 contracts to unsigned players.
Sources: Associated Press

Awards and honors[edit]

American League National League
Player Team Position Player Team
Vladimir Guerrero Texas Rangers DH / Pitcher Yovani Gallardo Milwaukee Brewers
Joe Mauer Minnesota Twins Catcher Brian McCann Atlanta Braves
Miguel Cabrera Detroit Tigers 1st baseman Albert Pujols St. Louis Cardinals
Robinson Canó New York Yankees 2nd baseman     Dan Uggla Florida Marlins
Adrián Beltré Boston Red Sox 3rd baseman Ryan Zimmerman Washington Nationals
Alexei Ramírez Chicago White Sox Shortstop Troy Tulowitzki Colorado Rockies
José Bautista Toronto Blue Jays Outfielder Ryan Braun Milwaukee Brewers
Carl Crawford Tampa Bay Rays Outfielder Carlos González Colorado Rockies
Josh Hamilton Texas Rangers Outfielder Matt Holliday St. Louis Cardinals
American League National League
Player Team Position Player Team
Mark Buehrle Chicago White Sox Pitcher Bronson Arroyo Cincinnati Reds
Joe Mauer Minnesota Twins Catcher Yadier Molina St. Louis Cardinals
Mark Teixeira New York Yankees 1st baseman Albert Pujols St. Louis Cardinals
Robinson Canó New York Yankees 2nd baseman     Brandon Phillips Cincinnati Reds
Evan Longoria Tampa Bay Rays 3rd baseman Scott Rolen Cincinnati Reds
Derek Jeter New York Yankees Shortstop Troy Tulowitzki Colorado Rockies
Carl Crawford Tampa Bay Rays Outfielder Carlos González Colorado Rockies
Franklin Gutiérrez Seattle Mariners Outfielder Michael Bourn Houston Astros
Ichiro Suzuki Seattle Mariners Outfielder Shane Victorino Philadelphia Phillies

Others[edit]

  • Woman Executive of the Year (major or minor league): Sharon Ridley, Nashville Sounds, Pacific Coast League

Major Leagues

Player Team Position
Mark Buehrle Chicago White Sox Pitcher
Yadier Molina St. Louis Cardinals Catcher
Daric Barton Oakland Athletics 1st baseman
Chase Utley Philadelphia Phillies 2nd baseman
Evan Longoria Tampa Bay Rays 3rd baseman
Troy Tulowitzki Colorado Rockies Shortstop
Brett Gardner New York Yankees Left fielder
Michael Bourn Houston Astros Center fielder
Ichiro Suzuki Seattle Mariners Right fielder

Minor Leagues

Events[edit]

January[edit]

  • January 4 – The New York Mets announce the official signing of Jason Bay to a four-year, $66 million contract, which includes a fifth-year vesting option. The two sides originally agree on the deal on December 29, 2009, however, it is not official until after Bay passes his physical.
300 win club member Randy Johnson announced his retirement in January 2010.
I wish it never came into my life. But we're sitting here talking about it. I'm so sorry that I have to. I apologize to everybody at Major League Baseball, my family, the Marises, Bud Selig... Today was the hardest day of my life.

February[edit]

Lincecum and the Giants agree on a 2-year, $23 million deal
  • February 11
    • Tom Glavine retires after 22 major league seasons and accepts a front office job with the Atlanta Braves. The 300 game winner pitches at the major league level in 2008, and is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2014, alongside longtime Braves teammate and fellow 300 game winner Greg Maddux.
    • After sitting out the entire 2009 season, Frank Thomas announces his official retirement from baseball.
  • February 22
    • Johnny Damon joins the Detroit Tigers, signing a one-year, $8 million contract.
    • British rugby league player Terry Newton is the first professional athlete suspended for testing positive for human growth hormone. The blood test has been in existence since the 2004 Summer Olympics, but baseball officials say that its validity is not universally accepted by the scientific community, until now. Bud Selig introduces a plan to test minor leaguers for HGH shortly afterwards.
  • February 23 – Aaron Boone announces his retirement.
  • February 25 – The Texas Rangers void the contract of off-season acquisition Khalil Greene, who does not report to Spring training due to social anxiety disorder. Greene goes on the disabled list twice last season while with the St. Louis Cardinals due to his disorder.
  • February 26 – Female pitcher Eri Yoshida, formerly of the Kobe 9 Cruise in the Kansai Independent Baseball League in Japan, is drafted by the Chico Outlaws of the Golden Baseball League. She is introduced as a member of the team on May 7, less than two weeks after graduating from high school and only a few hours after she lands in San Francisco following a flight from Tokyo. She becomes the first woman to play at the professional level in an American baseball league alongside men since Ila Borders and the first to play in professional baseball in two countries.

March[edit]

Garciaparra, with the Red Sox in 2002, retired as a member of the Red Sox during Spring training 2010
  • March 16
    • Though John Smoltz has yet to officially retire, Turner Sports announces that Smoltz will serve as one of their guest analysts for national broadcasts and will serve the same role for the 45 Atlanta Braves games that Peachtree Television will broadcast this season. Smoltz also joined the MLB Network's on-air roster the same day.
    • Former major league infielder Chuck Knoblauch pleads guilty to misdemeanor assault on his common-law wife. Knoblauch entered his plea in exchange for deferred-adjudication probation. He was also fined $1,000.
  • March 17 – Texas Rangers manager Ron Washington calls a press conference apologizing for using and testing positive for cocaine during the first half of the 2009 season. A day later, Washington admits to having smoked marijuana and taken amphetamines during his playing career.
  • March 21 – Reigning American League MVP Joe Mauer signs an eight-year, $184 million contract extension with the Minnesota Twins that will take him through the 2018 season.

April[edit]

  • April 7 – San Francisco Giants outfielder Eugenio Vélez enters the seventh inning of the Giants' 10–4 victory over the Houston Astros at Minute Maid Park wearing a jersey with a pair of letters transposed. No one noticed his uniform read "San Francicso" until after the game had already ended.
  • April 21 – The Chicago Cubs confirmed reports that manager Lou Piniella is moving struggling starter Carlos Zambrano to the bullpen, in a move that may not be temporary. Zambrano is 1–2 with a 7.45 ERA in four starts, and the move makes room for Ted Lilly, who is returning to the Cubs' starting rotation after undergoing offseason shoulder surgery. Piniella announced the movement one day after a 4–0 loss to the New York Mets, in which Zambrano pitched six innings and gave up two earned runs, while the Cubs bullpen gave up two, bringing the bullpen's ERA to 6.15.
Ryan Howard signed a five-year, $125 million contract extension with the Phillies on April 26
  • April 24 – Ted Lilly pitches six shutout innings in his season debut, Carlos Zambrano made his first appearance out of the bullpen in almost eight years, and the Chicago Cubs beat the Milwaukee Brewers, 5–1, at Miller Park. Lilly struck out four and walked two after being activated from the 15-day disabled list before the game. He was out while recovering from left shoulder surgery in November. Zambrano gave up a run in 1⅓ innings and had a sacrifice fly in Chicago's three-run eighth.
  • April 26 – The Philadelphia Phillies sign Ryan Howard to a five-year, $125 million contract extension that will keep Howard with the Phillies through 2016. It is the largest contract in Phillies history, and the third-largest average annual value of a contract ($25 million per year) in baseball history.
  • April 28 – All-Star rosters have been expanded again by commissioner Bud Selig's special committee for on-field matters, with each team bringing 34 players, with 13 pitchers per team, to the July 13 game at Angel Stadium in Anaheim, California, as part of several changes. Another change is that a pitcher who starts on the final Sunday before the All-Star break will be ineligible to pitch in the ASG and will be replaced on the roster. In addition, a designated hitter will be used in the ASG every year, including in National League cities; the AL's starting DH will continue to be elected by fans, and the NL's starting DH will be chosen by the NL All-Star manager. Under a change that runs contrary to normal baseball rules, each manager may designate a position player who will be eligible for re-entry to the game if the final position player, at any position, is injured.[4]
  • April 29 – A new report shows Major League Baseball equaled its best grades for racial and gender diversity hiring, even as the percentage of African American players dropped again last year, from 10.2 percent to 9 percent last season. The sport had made a small stride since reaching a low of 8.2 percent in 2007, but the latest data indicates a steady rise among black players might be years away.[5]

May[edit]

  • May 2 – Minnesota Twins catcher Wilson Ramos goes 4-for-5 with a double in his major league debut. He is the only Twin besides Kirby Puckett in 1984 to collect four hits in a major league debut, and the only catcher in modern history (since 1900) to collect four hits in his MLB debut. He follows his debut by going three-for-four and driving in his first run on May 3.
  • May 3
    • New York Yankees second baseman Robinson Canó and Minnesota Twins starter Francisco Liriano were named the American League Player and Pitcher of the Month for April, respectively. Canó hit a Major League-best .400 batting average, including eight home runs, 21 runs scored and 18 RBI. Liriano went 3–0 and finished as the only AL starter with a sub-1.00 ERA (0.93) in 29 innings, which included a 23-inning scoreless streak.[6]
    • During the eighth inning of the Phillies-Cardinals game, 17-year-old Steve Consalvi is tasered after storming the field at Citizens Bank Park.
    • Arizona Diamondbacks second baseman Kelly Johnson and Colorado Rockies starter Ubaldo Jiménez were named the National League Player of the Month and Pitcher of the Month, respectively, for April. Johnson hit .313 with 17 runs scored and 18 RBI, and also led the league with nine home runs and a slugging of .750. Jiménez, who posted a 5–0 record with 31 strikeouts and a 0.79 ERA in 34⅓ innings of work, also hurled the first no-hitter in Rockies history.[7]
  • May 7
    • At Citizens Bank Park, Jamie Moyer becomes the first pitcher to throw a shutout in four separate decades, giving up only two hits in the of the Philadelphia Phillies's 7–0 victory over the Atlanta Braves. At 47 years, 170 days old, Moyer is also the oldest pitcher to throw a Major League shutout, eclipsing Phil Niekro's record by almost a year. At 46 years, 188 days old, Niekro, while pitching for the New York Yankees, tossed a four-hit shutout against the Toronto Blue Jays on October 6, 1985; the shutout was also Niekro's 300th career victory.[8]
    • Starlin Castro of the Chicago Cubs becomes the first player born in the 1990s to play in the majors. Castro arrived in historic style, hitting a three-run home run in his first at-bat and a bases-loaded triple, sliding headfirst into the record books with six runs batted in, the most ever in a modern day debut. Chicago defeated the Cincinnati Reds, 14–7, while the 20-year-old rookie became the youngest shortstop in Cubs history, surpassing Marty Shay, who was 100 days older when he made it to the majors in 1916.[9]
Ángel Pagán
  • May 27 – The New York Mets complete a three-game sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies in which Philadelphia is shut out all three games. The last time the Mets accomplished such a feat was September 26–28, 1969 also against the Phillies.

June[edit]

Ken Griffey, Jr. announced his retirement on June 2, 2010
  • June 2
    • After 22 seasons, Ken Griffey, Jr. announced he is retiring, effective immediately.[14]
    • Boston Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz and starting pitcher Jon Lester earned American League Player and Pitcher of the Month, respectively, for May. Ortiz hit .363 (29–80) in 23 games, including four doubles, 10 home runs, 16 runs and 27 RBI. He also posted a Major League-best .788 slugging percentage and a .424 on-base percentage. Lester, who posted a perfect 5–0 record in six outings, allowed just 24 hits through 44.0 innings of work while leading the Majors with 45 strikeouts. His 1.84 ERA, was the lowest of any AL pitcher with more than 27 innings pitched, while his five wins in May boosted his career record to 48–18, and his .727 winning percentage is the best in ML history (since 1901) among pitchers with at least 50 decisions and the ninth-best winning percentage ever through a pitcher's first 100 starts. It is the fourth career Player of the Month Award for Ortiz and the third Pitcher of the Month honor for Lester. It marks the first time that the two AL monthly awards were captured by teammates in the same month since June 2006, when Joe Mauer and Johan Santana of the Minnesota Twins won the honors.[15]
    • Atlanta Braves first baseman Troy Glaus and Colorado Rockies starting pitcher Ubaldo Jiménez were selected National League Player and Pitcher of the Month, respectively, for May. Glaus led the NL with 28 RBI, while hitting .330 (34–103) with six home runs, 17 runs and a .534 slugging percentage. The 2002 World Series Most Valuable Player finished the month riding a six-game hitting streak. Jiménez became the first pitcher in the majors to win the monthly award in April and May since Pedro Martínez of the Boston Red Sox did it in 1999. He also is the first NL pitcher to repeat the feat since John Smoltz of the Atlanta Braves did it in 1996. Jiménez ranked first in the NL in ERA (0.78) and was tied for first in victories (5) and innings pitched (46.0) for the month. On May 3 he struck out a career-high 13 batters in 7.0 innings of work against the San Diego Padres, and ended the month with 26.0 consecutive scoreless innings. This scoreless stretch marks the second time this season that Jiménez has pitched 25 or more consecutive innings of shutout ball.[16]
    • Detroit Tigers pitcher Armando Galarraga comes within one out of a perfect game. With two outs in the ninth inning, Cleveland Indians shortstop Jason Donald hits a soft ground ball to Tigers first baseman Miguel Cabrera, who tosses the ball to Galarraga covering first base. Though video replay showed that Galarraga beat Donald to the bag, first base umpire Jim Joyce calls Donald safe. Joyce was heckled by Tigers players and coaches for several minutes afterward, almost causing a brawl. The next batter, Trevor Crowe, grounded out to Brandon Inge, ending the game in a 3–0 victory for the Tigers.[17] Later on Fox Sports Detroit's Tigers Live post-game show, Galarraga said Joyce apologized to him and gave him a hug.
I just cost that kid a perfect game, I thought he beat the throw. I was convinced he beat the throw, until I saw the replay.
  • June 8 – Washington Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg makes his big league debut against the Pittsburgh Pirates, striking out fourteen, including his last seven, and not walking any over seven innings. The 2009 Major League Baseball Draft #1 overall pick wins his MLB debut, 5–2.
  • June 13
    • Jorge Posada clubs his second grand slam in two days in the New York Yankees' 9–5 victory over the Houston Astros. Posada becomes the first Major Leaguer to hit grand slams in back-to-back contests since Carlos Beltrán in 2006 and the first Yankee since Bill Dickey in 1937.
    • In an Interleague meeting between the two Chicago teams at Wrigley Field, both starting pitchers carry no-hitters into the seventh inning. The White Sox's Gavin Floyd has his bid for a no-hitter broken up with two out in the seventh by an Alfonso Soriano double. Soriano scores on Chad Tracy's single one batter later for the game's lone run. Ted Lilly's is broken up in the ninth by Ex-Cub Juan Pierre with a leadoff single. After Pierre's single, Lilly is relieved by Carlos Mármol, who loads the bases but hangs on for the save. Lilly would have been the first pitcher to throw a no-hitter at Wrigley Field since Milt Pappas in 1972.
  • June 15 – The Oakland A's acquire outfielder Conor Jackson from the Arizona Diamondbacks for Minor League pitcher Sam Demel.

July[edit]

  • July 6
    • Texas Rangers outfielder Josh Hamilton and Seattle Mariners pitcher Cliff Lee earned American League Player and Pitcher of the Month, respectively, for June. Hamilton led all Major League batters with a .454 average. That, combined with 10 doubles, nine homers a club-record 49 hits and a 23-game hitting streak, secured the honor for Hamilton. He capped his monster month by officially hitting the longest home run in the history of Rangers Ballpark, in a June 27 game against the Astros. Lee, who posted a 4-1 record with a 1.76 ERA, struck out 36 batters while walking only two. At one point, he completed a streak of 38⅓ innings without giving up a walk.
    • New York Mets third baseman David Wright and Florida Marlins pitcher Josh Johnson were voted National League Player and Pitcher of the Month, respectively, for June. Wright led the league with a .404 average and 29 RBI, placed second in slugging (.683) and on-base percentage (.447), and was tied for third in doubles (11), while hitting six home runs and swiping four bases in 26 games. He also became the first player in Mets history to hit at least .400 with 25 or more RBI in a calendar month while recording a 29-RBI month for the second time in his career (June 2006). Johnson compiled a 3-1 record in five June starts with a 1.18 ERA, while striking out 38 in 38.0 innings and walking just six. His ERA was second-best among N.L. starters on the month while placing third in strikeouts. Johnson allowed no more than two earned runs in each of his starts this month and has not allowed more than two earned runs in nine-consecutive starts (dating back to June 13).
Cliff Lee & Mark Lowe go to the Texas Rangers for Justin Smoak & 3 pitching prospects
  • July 13 – The National League wins its first All-Star Game since 1996. Atlanta Braves catcher Brian McCann wins the All Star MVP Award after driving in all 3 of the runs scored for the National League.
  • July 16 - In the Texas Rangers' 8-4 victory over the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park, Bengie Molina became the eighth player since 1900, and the first catcher, to hit a grand slam and hit for the cycle in the same game. His triple to complete the cycle comes in the eighth inning; he hits a fly ball to the deepest part of the park in center field, into the triangle, the ball glancing off center fielder Eric Patterson's glove. Molina became the first catcher to hit for the cycle since Chad Moeller on April 27, 2004, and the first visiting player to hit for the cycle at Fenway Park since Cleveland's Andre Thornton on April 2, 1978.[26]
  • July 20 - Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Clayton Kershaw is accused of intentionally hitting Aaron Rowand of the San Francisco Giants and ejected from the game. Joe Torre and bench coach Bob Schaefer argued the call and were also ejected. The next day, Kershaw was suspended five games while Torre and Schaefer got one day suspensions.[27]
  • July 23 - Yankee catcher Jorge Posada records his 1,000th career RBI.
  • July 31 - Carlos González hit a game-ending home run to complete the cycle, and the Colorado Rockies rallied to beat the Chicago Cubs, 6–5, after blowing a three-run lead in the eighth inning. It was the fourth straight game for González with a homer, while his cycle was the sixth in Rockies history and fourth in the majors this season. Besides González, just four other players in MLB history have completed a cycle with a walk-off home run: Ken Boyer (1961),[31] César Tovar (1972),[32] George Brett (1979)[33] and Dwight Evans (1984).[34]

August[edit]

National League Player of the Month Buster Posey
  • August 4:
    • At Yankee Stadium, Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees hits his 600th home run, becoming the seventh player in Major League history to do so, in a 5–1 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays. The shot comes in the first inning against the Jays' Shaun Marcum and three years to the day of Rodriguez' 500th home run. Rodriguez also becomes the youngest player to hit his 600th home run, at 35 years, 8 days; Babe Ruth had held the previous record at 36 years, 196 days.[35]
    • San Francisco Giants rookie catcher Buster Posey and Philadelphia Phillies ace Roy Halladay have been voted the National League Player and Pitcher of the Month, respectively, for July. Posey led the NL with 43 hits and ranked third with a .417 average (43-for-103). His 24 RBI were tied for third-best in the N.L., while his .466 on-base percentage and .699 slugging percentage ranked fourth and fifth in the league, respectively. He belted seven home runs, while his 21-game hitting streak from July 4–29 marked the longest streak in the NL this season. In five July starts, Halladay went 3-1 with a 1.54 ERA. His 39 strikeouts were good for second in the National League while his 41.0 innings pitched ranked fourth. He notched his Major League-leading eighth complete game of the season, while his 158 strikeouts and 2.17 ERA rank second in the Majors and his 13 wins are tied for fourth.
    • Toronto Blue Jays outfielder José Bautista and Minnesota Twins designated hitter Delmon Young have been voted the American League Players of the Month for July, while Chicago White Sox starting pitcher Gavin Floyd has been voted the American League Pitcher of the Month for July. Bautista led the Majors with 11 home runs during July, marking the second time this season he has recorded the most home runs in a single month (12 in May). He also led the AL with a .765 slugging percentage and ranked third with 29 RBI while posting a .347 batting average with eight doubles and 20 runs scored, including a 10 multi-hit efforts during the month. Young paced the AL with 46 hits during the month, batting .434 (46-for-106), and tied for the league-lead with 12 doubles. He also finished second in the league with 30 RBI and collected six home runs with 17 runs scored while slugging .736, hitting safely in 23 of 26 games, and had multi-hit performances in 16 contests. Floyd posted a Major League-leading 0.80 ERA en route to a 3–1 mark over five starts in July. In 33.2 innings pitched, he allowed just three earned runs on 28 hits with seven walks and 25 strikeouts while holding opposing hitters to a .228 batting average. He earned victories in back-to-back home starts to begin the month, allowing just one earned run in each start. He later tossed 15 shutout innings and not allowed more than two earned runs in 11 consecutive outings. In addition, his 1.06 ERA since June 8 ranks first in the Majors ahead of San Diego Padres' Mat Latos (1.57).
  • August 6 - In Detroit, the Angels' Torii Hunter got ejected for arguing a strikeout. In a fit of rage, he threw a bag of balls on to the field. The next day, he was suspended four games.[36]
  • August 7 - The Blue Jays hit eight home runs in an 17–11 victory over the Rays. Leading the way was J. P. Arencibia with two in his Major League debut. Arencibia became the first player in the modern era to have four hits and two home runs in his major league debut.[37]
  • August 8 - At Rogers Centre, Brandon Morrow of the Toronto Blue Jays tosses his first shutout, first complete game with a career-high 17 strikeouts in a 1–0 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays. A two-out RBI-single by Vernon Wells in the first inning marked the difference. Morrow only allowed a two-out single by Evan Longoria in the ninth inning. It marked the fifth time this season the Rays have taken one or zero hits in a single game, including a perfect game and one no-hitter. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, that is the most such games in a single season in the live ball era (since 1920). Eleven other teams have four such games in a season. Only twice in the modern era (since 1900) has a team been held to one hit or fewer in more than five games in a season. In 1910, the Chicago White Sox and St. Louis Browns both had six such games. To date, Dave Stieb has pitched the only no-hitter in Blue Jays history (September 2, 1990).[38][39]
  • August 9 - After accumulating an AL West-worst record (and third worst in all of baseball) of 42–70, the Seattle Mariners fire manager Don Wakamatsu, bench coach Ty Van Burkleo, pitching coach Rick Adair and performance coach Steve Hecht. They were replaced by Daren Brown, Roger Hansen, and Carl Willis, respectively.[40]
  • August 11 - The Arizona Diamondbacks tie a major league record by hitting four consecutive home runs, with Adam LaRoche, Miguel Montero, Mark Reynolds and Stephen Drew connecting in the fourth inning to beat the Milwaukee Brewers, 8–2, at Miller Park. The Diamondbacks became just the seventh team in major league history to accomplish the feat.[41]
  • August 17 - At Target Field, Jim Thome hits a two-run walk-off home run in the tenth inning to lift the Minnesota Twins over the Chicago White Sox, 7-6. It was the 12th walk-off home run of his career, tying him for first all time with Jimmie Foxx, Mickey Mantle, Stan Musial, Frank Robinson, and Babe Ruth (among others).
  • August 18 - At Fenway Park, the Red Sox defeated the Angels, 7–5. By striking out the side in the ninth inning, Red Sox closer Jonathan Papelbon became the first pitcher to notch at least 30 saves in five consecutive major league seasons.
  • August 19 - former major league pitcher Roger Clemens is indicted by a federal grand jury on charges of lying to Congress over his use of performance enhancing drugs.
  • August 22 - Chicago Cubs manager Lou Piniella, who had previously announced that he would retire at the end of the season, announces his immediate retirement in order to care for his ailing mother.[42]
  • August 30 - The Chicago White Sox acquired slugger Manny Ramirez from the Los Angeles Dodgers off waivers.[43]

September[edit]

  • September 1 - Nyjer Morgan of the Washington Nationals charges the mound after Florida Marlins pitcher Chris Volstad throws behind him, starting a brawl.[44] Morgan received an eight-game suspension which he began serving on September 17, while Volstad began serving a six-game suspension on September 13.
  • September 2
    • Toronto Blue Jays outfielder José Bautista and Boston Red Sox starting pitcher Clay Buchholz earned the American League Player and Pitcher of the Month, respectively, for August. Bautista led the league in home runs (12), runs batted in (24), slugging percentage (.724) and total bases (72), and tied for the lead in extra-base hits (18). This is the second career monthly award for Bautista, who shared last month's honor with Delmon Young of the Minnesota Twins. Buchholz went 4-0 with a 1.03 earned run average and 28 strikeouts over six August starts. He finished the month second in ERA, tied for second in wins, tied for third in innings pitched (43.2), and also led the majors with a 2.21 ERA on the season. This is the first career monthly award for Buchholz.
    • St. Louis Cardinals first baseman Albert Pujols and Atlanta Braves starter Tim Hudson were voted the National League Player and Pitcher of the Month, respectively, for August. In 26 games last month, Pujols batted .379 (39-for-103) and led the circuit with 11 home runs, a .777 slugging and 29 runs scored while driving in 23 runs. On August 26, Pujols clubbed his 400th career home run, his 34th of the season, becoming the first player to reach the 400-homer plateau in his first 10 Major League seasons. This is the fifth career monthly award for Pujols, the most recent being earned in June 2009. Hudson went 4-0 with a 1.71 earned run average in six starts and struck out 35 while walking only nine in 42 innings of work. On August 28, he notched his 1,500th career strikeout and his 600th for Atlanta in a 12–3 victory over the Florida Marlins. This is the second career monthly award for Hudson and his first since winning American League honors in September 2000 with the Oakland Athletics.
  • September 4 - At Target Field, Jim Thome of the Minnesota Twins hits two home runs in the Twins' 12-4 victory over the Texas Rangers. The home runs give Thome 584 on his career, moving him past Mark McGwire for ninth place on the all-time list.[45]
  • September 6 - At Yankee Stadium, Alex Rodriguez sets a Major League record by registering 100 runs batted in for the 14th time in his career. After homering in the fourth inning of the New York Yankees' 4-3 loss to the Baltimore Orioles, Rodriguez records his 100th RBI in the sixth inning, on a sacrifice fly that scores Nick Swisher. Rodriguez breaks a four-way tie that he had shared with Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Jimmie Foxx with 13 seasons of at least 100 RBIs.[46]
  • September 8 - In the Milwaukee Brewers' 4-2 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals at Miller Park, Trevor Hoffman records his 600th save.[47]
  • September 11 - At Progressive Field, Jim Thome of the Minnesota Twins hits a 12th-inning home run for the lone run of the game in the Twins' 1-0 victory over his former team, the Cleveland Indians. The home run gives Thome 587 on his career, passing Frank Robinson for eight place on the all-time home run list.[48]
Ichiro is the first player to record 200 hits in 10 consecutive seasons
  • September 19
  • September 23 - At Rogers Centre, Ichiro Suzuki of the Seattle Mariners becomes the first player to record 200 hits in 10 consecutive seasons. His 200th hit, a double, comes off Toronto Blue Jays starter Shawn Hill in the third inning. Suzuki also breaks an American League record he had shared with Ty Cobb of nine seasons with 200 hits, and ties Pete Rose's record of 10 200-hit seasons. However, the Blue Jays defeat the Mariners 1-0 as José Bautista, who had already broken George Bell's single-season franchise record of 47 home runs in 1987, hits number 50 in the first inning off Félix Hernández for the game's only run.[49][50]
  • September 24 - Cincinnati Reds left-hander Aroldis Chapman throws the fastest pitch ever recorded in a major league game at 105 M.P.H. to the San Diego Padres' Tony Gwynn, Jr..
  • September 25 - Texas Rangers' rookie closer Neftalí Feliz acquires his 38th save of the season against the Oakland Athletics, setting a record for most saves by a rookie in a single season. He surpassed the previous record of 37 held by former Seattle Mariners' closer Kazuhiro Sasaki in 2000. Feliz's total for the year is at 40 saves. The win by the Texas Rangers also clinched their first AL West division title since 1999.[51]
  • September 28
  • September 30 – MLB players and owners agree to free agency changes. Under the deal announced on this date, players no longer have to file for free agency but automatically are set free. The exclusive period for teams to negotiate with their free agent-eligible players was cut from 15 days to five. The deadline was moved up for clubs to offer salary arbitration to their former players who became free agents, as was the deadline for teams to offer contracts for the following season to players on their 40-man rosters. In addition, teams, players and agents will be restricted in their ability to conduct free-agent negotiations in the media.[53]

October[edit]

  • October 3 – On the final day of the regular season, the San Francisco Giants and Atlanta Braves clinched playoff berths. The Giants defeat the San Diego Padres 3–0 to win the NL West, simultaneously clinching the wild-card berth for the Braves, who had beaten the Philadelphia Phillies earlier in the day.
  • October 4
    • New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez and Colorado Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki were selected American League and National League Players of the Month, respectively, for September. Rodriguez provided a bright spot for the Yankees down the final stretch run, leading the American League in RBIs (26) and slugging percentage (.667), while tying for second with nine home runs. He also reached safely in 18 of 22 games for his team, propelling the Yankees to their 15th postseason berth in the last 16 years. Tulowitzki provided plenty of support for Colorado, leading the Majors with 15 home runs, 40 RBIs, 30 runs scored and an .800 slugging percentage. Tulowitzki finished the season ranked first among Major League shortstops in home runs (27), RBIs (95), batting average (.315), slugging percentage (.568) and OPS (.949), to become the first player to lead all National League shortstops in both slugging percentage and fielding percentage (.984) since Jay Bell accomplished the feat in 1993 with the Pittsburgh Pirates.
    • David Price of the Tampa Bay Rays and Derek Lowe of the Atlanta Braves were voted the American League and National League Pitchers of the Month, respectively, for September. Price was instrumental in the Rays winning their second AL East Championship in club history, as he posted a 4–0 record with 33 strikeouts and a 1.67 over six starts. Lowe was equally impressive for the Braves, who secured the NL Wild Card for their first trip to the playoffs since 2005, collecting a perfect 5–0 in five September starts, with a 1.17 ERA and a strikeout-to-walk ratio of 29:3. Lowe also pitched on three days' rest, winning a critical game against the Florida Marlins on September 29, and finished the regular season with a 16–12 record and a 4.00 ERA, with 136 strikeouts in 193 ⅔ innings of work.
    • The New York Mets announced that both manager Jerry Manuel and general manager Omar Minaya would not return for the 2011 season.
  • October 5 – In Japanese baseball, former major leaguer Matt Murton broke Ichiro Suzuki's record for the most hits in a single season. Murton got his 211th hit of the year with a two-run single to center in the second inning for the Hanshin Tigers against the Yakult Swallows. Suzuki set the record of 210 in 1994 for the Orix BlueWave.[54]
  • October 6 – In Game One of the NLDS at Citizens Bank Park, Roy Halladay of the Philadelphia Phillies no-hit the Cincinnati Reds 4–0. A fifth-inning walk to Jay Bruce was the only base runner against Halladay, who had already pitched a perfect game on May 29. The no-hitter was the second in postseason play, joining Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series. Halladay also becomes the first pitcher to throw two no-hitters in one season since Nolan Ryan in 1973.
  • October 9 - The New York Yankees defeat the Minnesota Twins 6-1, sweeping the ALDS in three games.
  • October 10 - The Philadelphia Phillies defeat the Cincinnati Reds 2-0, completing a three-game sweep of the NLDS.
  • October 11 - The San Francisco Giants defeat the Atlanta Braves 3-2 to win the NLDS 3 games to 1. All four games in the series are decided by one run.
  • October 12 - The Texas Rangers defeat the Tampa Bay Rays 5-1 in Game 5 of the ALDS to win a postseason series for the first time. Each game in the series is won by the road team.
  • October 22 - The Texas Rangers defeat the New York Yankees 6-1 to win the ALCS four games to two.
  • October 23 - The San Francisco Giants defeat the Philadelphia Phillies 3-2 to win the NLCS four games to two.
  • October 28 - The San Francisco Giants defeat the Texas Rangers 9-0 in Game 2 of the World Series. Texas reliever Derek Holland issues three consecutive walks in the eighth inning on only 13 pitches, including 11 balls in a row. The three consecutive walks tie a World Series record.
  • October 29 – The New York Mets named Sandy Alderson their new general manager.
  • October 31 – In Game 4 of the World Series, Madison Bumgarner and Buster Posey of the San Francisco Giants became the first all-rookie battery in a World Series game since 1947. Bumgarner combined with Brian Wilson to three-hit the Texas Rangers in a 4-0 San Francisco victory. Combined with a 9-0 loss to the Giants in Game 2, the Rangers become the first team to be shut out twice in a World Series since 1966. It is also the Giants pitching staff's fourth shutout of the postseason, tying a Major League record.

November[edit]

December[edit]

  • December 1 - Dan Shulman, Orel Hershiser and Bobby Valentine will be in the booth for ESPN's Sunday Night Baseball next season, the network announces.[56]
  • December 5 - Outfielder Jayson Werth signs as a Free Agent with the Washington Nationals for seven years and $122 million.
  • December 6
  • December 7
    • A lawsuit is filed against Fred Wilpon, Jeff Wilpon, Saul Katz and various affiliated entities affiliated with the New York Mets and Sterling Equities Associates to recover money for the victims of the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme. The civil suit, brought by court-appointed trustee Irving Picard, alleges that the partners in Sterling, knew or should have known that Madoff's investment operation was a fraud.
    • The Baseball Writers' Association of America announces Bill Conlin as the 2011 recipient of the J. G. Taylor Spink Award for meritorious contributions to baseball writing. He will receive the award on July 23, 2011 as part of the Hall of Fame induction festivities.
  • December 8 – The National Baseball Hall of Fame announces Dave Van Horne as the 2011 recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award for excellence in baseball broadcasting. He will receive the award alongside Conlin on July 23, 2011.
  • December 11 - Outfielder Carl Crawford signs as a Free Agent with the Boston Red Sox for seven-years and $142 million.
  • December 15 - Pitcher Cliff Lee returns to the Philadelphia Phillies, signing a five-year, $120 million contract with a vesting option for a sixth season in 2016, which would increase the value of the deal to $135 million.
  • December 16 - The New York Yankees signed free agent catcher Russell Martin.
  • December 17
    • Derek Jeter and the New York Yankees agree on a new three-year, $51 million contract that includes a player option for the 2014 season.
    • The Tampa Bay Rays trade Jason Bartlett and a player to be named to the San Diego Padres for Cole Figueroa, Brandon Gomes, Cesar Ramos and Adam Russell.
  • December 19 - The Kansas City Royals trade pitcher Zack Greinke and shortstop Yuniesky Betancourt to the Milwaukee Brewers for Lorenzo Cain, Alcides Escobar, Jeremy Jeffress and Jake Odorizzi. The Royals had a deal in place that would have sent Greinke to the Washington Nationals for infielder Danny Espinosa, reliever Drew Storen and pitcher Jordan Zimmermann, however, Greinke invoked his no-trade clause to reject the deal.
  • December 20 - Florida International University baseball star Garrett Wittels and four friends are arrested in the Bahamas and charged with raping two seventeen-year-old girls at the Atlantis Resort & Casino on Paradise Island. Wittels and two friends were released on $10,000 bond apiece after a court hearing on the 23rd.
  • December 21
    • All-Star closer Bobby Jenks joins the Boston Red Sox, signing a two-year, $12 million deal to be the setup man for Jonathan Papelbon.
    • Pitcher Rich Harden rejoins the Oakland Athletics, signing a one year, $1.5 million contract.
  • December 23 - The Houston Astros send relief pitcher Matt Lindstrom to the Colorado Rockies for pitchers Jonnathan Aristil and Wes Musick.
  • December 30 - Hall of Famer Harmon Killebrew reveals in a statement that he has recently been diagnosed with esophageal cancer, and is being treated by a team of medical professionals at the Mayo Clinic.[57]

Deaths[edit]

January[edit]

  • January 3 – Bobby Wilkins, 87, shortstop for the 1944 and 1945 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • January 4 – Rory Markas, 54, play-by-play announcer for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and the Milwaukee Brewers.[58]
  • January 12 – Hillis Layne, 91, third baseman for the Washington Senators in the 1940s, who also led the Pacific Coast League hitters in 1947 with a .367 average.
  • January 26 – Ken Walters, 76, backup outfielder for the Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds in the early 1960s.
  • January 27 – Sammy Drake, 75, Negro League infielder and a member of the original 1962 New York Mets.[59]
  • January 28 – Frank Baker, 66, outfielder for the Cleveland Indians and a Vietnam War veteran.

February[edit]

  • February 7 – Paul LaPalme, 86, left-handed knuckleball pitcher for the Pirates, Cardinals, Redlegs and White Sox from 1951 to 1957
  • February 12 – Jerry Fahr, 85, pitcher for the 1951 Cleveland Indians [59]
  • February 16 – Jim Bibby, 65, Major League pitcher from 1972 to 1984; won World Series with Pirates in 1979 and pitched first no-hitter in Senators/Rangers history (1973)
  • February 16 – Jim Waugh, 76, pitcher who posted a 5–11 record with a 6.43 ERA for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1952 to 1953
  • February 18 – Bob Chakales, 82, pitcher for the Indians, Orioles, White Sox, Senators and Red Sox [60]
  • February 19 – George Cisar, 99, outfielder for the 1937 Brooklyn Dodgers; the second-oldest former major-league player at the time of his death [61]
  • February 21 – George Strickland, 84, Major League shortstop for 10 seasons with the Indians and Pirates and a coach, manager and scout for 11 more [62]

March[edit]

  • March 3
    • Frank Bertaina, 65, pitcher for the Senators, Orioles and Cardinals between 1964 and 1970
    • Hank Small, 58, first baseman who played for the 1978 Atlanta Braves [63]
  • March 6 – Jim Roland, 67, pitcher who played from 1962 through 1972 for the Athletics, Twins, Yankees and Rangers
  • March 9 – Willie Davis, 69, three-time Gold Glove outfielder for the Dodgers, Expos, Rangers, Cardinals, Padres and Angels, member of the Dodgers' 1963 and 1965 World Series champions
  • March 15 - Ken Holcombe, 91, pitcher who posted an 18-22 record in six seasons with the Yankees, Reds, White Sox, Browns and Red Sox
  • March 16 – Billy Hoeft, 77, All-Star pitcher whose career spanned 15 seasons, mainly with the Detroit Tigers
  • March 17 – Van Fletcher, 85, pitcher for the 1955 Detroit Tigers
  • March 23 - Jim Colzie, 89, Negro league baseball pitcher
  • March 28 – John Purdin, 67, relief pitcher who played for the Los Angeles Dodgers between the 1964 and 1969 seasons.

April[edit]

  • April 2 – Mike Cuellar, 72, 4-time All-Star pitcher for the Cincinnati Redlegs, St. Louis Cardinals, Houston Astros, Baltimore Orioles, and California Angels between 1959 and 1977; won 1969 NL Cy Young Award and 1970 World Series; and was one of four 20-game winners on the 1971 Baltimore Orioles
  • April 3 – Jim Pagliaroni, 72, catcher for the Red Sox, Pirates, Athletics and Pilots, who set a Pirates all-time, season-record for catchers with 17 home runs in 1965
  • April 9 – Bill Moisan, 84, relief pitcher for the 1953 Chicago Cubs, who had been a prisoner of war in Germany in early 1945, earning the Silver Star, the Bronze Star and Purple Heart [64]
  • April 15 – Takuya Kimura, 37, Japanese player for the Nippon-Ham Fighters, Toyo Carp, and Giants from 1992 to 2009, and a member of the 2009 Japan Series champion
  • April 20 – Keli McGregor, 48, President of the Colorado Rockies and a former tight end in the National Football League
  • April 22 – Pete Castiglione, 89, third baseman who hit .255 in eight seasons with the Pirates and Cardinals [65]
  • April 22 – Dick Kenworthy, 69, backup infielder who hit .215 in 125 games with the Chicago White Sox from 1962 to 1968 [66]
  • April 29 - Penny O'Brian, 90, Canadian outfielder who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

May[edit]

  • May 6 – Robin Roberts, 83, Hall of Fame pitcher and a seven-time All-Star in 14 seasons with the Philadelphia Phillies, who led the National League in wins from 1952 to 1955, innings pitched from '51 to '55 and complete games from '52 to '56 [68]
  • May 8 – George Susce, 78, middle relief pitcher who posted a 22–17 record with a 4.42 ERA and three saves in 117 games for the Red Sox and Tigers from 1955 to 1959 [69]
  • May 17 – Dorothy Kamenshek, 84, seven-time All-Star first basewoman and two-time champion bat in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League
  • May 23 – José Lima, 37, All-Star Dominican pitcher who posted an 89–102 record in 13 seasons with the Tigers, Astros, Royals, Dodgers and Mets [70]
  • May 24
    • Morrie Martin, 87, pitcher who played for seven different teams from 1949 to 1959, mainly with the Philadelphia Athletics [69]
    • Rogelio Martínez, 91, Cuban pitcher for the 1950 Washington Senators
  • May 27 – Louise Arnold, 87, pitcher for the AAGPBL champion South Bend Blue Sox in 1951 and 1952, who hurled a no-hitter and led the league with a .833 winning percentage in 1951

June[edit]

  • June 1 – Freddie Burdette, 73, middle reliever who posted a 1–0 record with a 3.41 ERA and one save in 68 games for the Chicago Cubs from 1962 to 1964 [69]
  • June 14 – Oscar Azócar, 45, Venezuelan outfielder for the Yankees and Padres in the early 1990s.[71]
  • June 16 – Bob Hartman, 72, left-handed pitcher who had brief stints with the Milwaukee Braves in 1959 and the Cleveland Indians in 1962.[72]

July[edit]

  • July 8 - Clint Hartung, 87, pitcher and outfielder for the New York Giants from 1947 to 1952, who became the 11th player in major league history whose first home run came as a pitcher and later homered as a position player.
  • July 8 - Maje McDonnell, 89, Philadelphia Phillies coach from 1951 to 1957, and a World War II veteran who earned five battle stars and a Bronze Star.
  • July 9 - Frank Verdi, 84, shortstop who played briefly for the Yankees in the 1953 season and later managed in the minor leagues.
  • July 10 - Ed Palmquist, 77, relief pitcher who played from 1960 to 1961 with the Dodgers and Twins.
  • July 10 - Johnny Van Cuyk, 89, relief pitcher who played on the 1949 Brooklyn Dodgers team that won the National League pennant.[73]
  • July 15 - Billy Loes, 80, pitcher who posted an 80-63 record in 12 seasons with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Baltimore Orioles and San Francisco Giants.
  • July 16 - Kenny Kuhn, 73, backup infielder who hit .210 in 71 games with the Cleveland Indians from 1955 to 1957.[76]
  • July 21 - Ralph Houk, 90, third-string catcher for the New York Yankees who went on to win three straight American League pennants and two World Series championships in his first three seasons as their manager.
  • July 22 - Larry Fritz, 61, pinch-hitter for the 1975 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • July 26 - Jake Jacobs, 73, outfielder who played from 1960 to 1961 for the Washington Senators and Minnesota Twins.

August[edit]

  • August 7 - Keith Drumright, 55, second baseman for the 1978 Astros and the 1981 Athletics.
  • August 9 - Gene Hermanski, 90, outfielder for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago Cubs and Pittsburgh Pirates from 1943 to 1953, who also was a World War II veteran.
  • August 15 - Joe L. Brown, 91, Pirates’ general manager who helped build 1970s’ teams that beat the Orioles twice in the World Series.
  • August 21 - Satch Davidson, 74, National League umpire who worked behind the plate when Hank Aaron hit his historic 715th career home run as well as when Carlton Fisk hit his memorable homer in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series.
  • August 26 - Cal McLish, 84, All-Star pitcher with a 15-season career for five teams, who set a major league record with 16 consecutive road wins over the 1958–59 seasons, which stood for 36 years until Greg Maddux surpassed it over the 1994-95 seasons.

September[edit]

  • September 1 - Don Lang, 95, infielder for the Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Cardinals.[78]
  • September 9 - Eddie Phillips, 80, pinch-runner who scored four runs in nine games for the 1953 St. Louis Cardinals, but never batted or fielded a ball in the majors.
  • September 16 - Wayne Twitchell, 62, 1973 NL All-Star pitcher who posted a 48-65 record in ten seasons with the Brewers, Phillies, Expos, Mets and Mariners.
  • September 18 - Ray Coleman, 88, outfielder and World War II veteran, who hit a .258 average in five seasons for the St. Louis Browns, Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago White Sox.[79]
  • September 20 - Al Pilarcik, 80, outfielder and Korean War veteran, who hit .256 in 668 games for the Kansas City Athletics, Baltimore Orioles and Chicago White Sox.[80]
  • September 23 - Bob Shaw, 77, who spent eleven years in the majors pitching for the Tigers, White Sox, Kansas City Athletics, Milwaukee Braves, SF Giants, Mets and Cubs, and beat Sandy Koufax in 1959 World Series.[81]

October[edit]

  • October 16 - Valmy Thomas, 81, first Puerto Rican catcher to play in the majors.[69]
  • October 17 - Joe Lis, 64, first baseman who played from 1970 through 1977 for the Phillies, Twins, Indians and Mariners.[59]
  • October 17 - Freddy Schuman (Freddy Sez), 85, Yankee Stadium staple for the last 20 years.
  • October 31 - Artie Wilson, 90, Negro Leagues All-Star shortstop.

November[edit]

  • November 2 - Clyde King, 86, whose major league baseball career as a player, coach, manager and front-office man spanned six decades.[59]
  • November 4 - Sparky Anderson, 76, Hall of Fame manager; first manager to win the World Series in both leagues with the Cincinnati Reds (1975-1976) and Detroit Tigers 1984).[84]
  • November 10 - Dave Niehaus, 75, Hall of Fame broadcaster for the Seattle Mariners since its inception in 1977 to their final game of the 2010 season.[85]
  • November 13 - George Binks, 96, outfielder/first baseman who hit .253 in 351 games for the Washington Senators, Philadelphia Athletics and St. Louis Browns from 1944 to 1948. Hit .300 for the 1938 Tyler Trojans of the East Texas League.
  • November 20 - Danny McDevitt, 78, pitcher who posted a 21-27 record and a 4.40 ERA in six seasons, who is most remembered by start for the Dodgers last home game in Brooklyn, hurling a 2–0 shutout victory over the Pirates.[59]
  • November 22 - Tom Underwood, 56, pitcher who posted an 86-87 record with a 3.89 ERA for the Phillies, Cardinals, Blue Jays, Yankees, Athletics and Orioles from 1974 to 1984.[59]
  • November 27 - Bill Werle, 89, who pitched for the Pirates, Red Sox and Cardinals from 1949 to 1954.
  • November 28
    • Cal Emery, 73, first baseman for the 1963 Phillies, who also played in Japan, managed in the minors, and was a major league coach.[59]
    • Gil McDougald, 82, All-Star infielder who helped the New York Yankees win five World Series championships during the 1950s.[59]
  • November 30 - R. C. Stevens, 76, first baseman who batted .210 with eight home runs in 104 games for the Pirates and Senators from 1958 to 1961.[59]

December[edit]

  • December 2 – Ron Santo, 70, nine-time All-Star and one of the greatest players in Chicago Cubs history.
  • December 4 - Ken Lehman, 82, left-handed specialist who posted a 14–10 record and a 3.91 ERA in 134 games for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Baltimore Orioles and Philadelphia Phillies.
  • December 15 – Bob Feller, 92, Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame pitcher.
  • December 17 – Walt Dropo, 87, who played 13 seasons in the majors and won the 1950 American League Rookie of the Year award with the Boston Red Sox, after batting .322 with 34 home runs and a league-best 144 RBI in 136 games.
  • December 18
    • Phil Cavarretta, 94, three-time All-Star who won the National League MVP in 1945 to lead the Chicago Cubs to their last World Series appearance.
    • Ann Cindric, 88, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League pitcher.
  • December 25 – Karl Olson, 80, outfielder who hit .235 with six home runs and 50 RBI in 279 games for the Red Sox, Senators and Tigers from 1951 to 1957.
  • December 28 – Bill Lajoie, 76, general manager who played an integral role in building the Detroit Tigers into a World Championship team in 1984 and a division title winner in 1987.
  • December 29 – Steve Boros, 74, former player, coach and manager for more than four decades in baseball.

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