Hong Kong Election Committee Subsector elections, 2011

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2011 Election Committee Subsector Elections
Hong Kong
2006 ←
11 December 2011
→ 2016

1,044 (of the 1,200) seats in the Election Committee
  First party Second party
  Tam Yau Chung.jpg Miriam Lau Kin Yee.jpg
Leader Tam Yiu-chung Miriam Lau
Party DAB Liberal
Alliance Pro-Beijing Pro-Beijing
Seats won 78 19

  Third party Fourth party
  Albert Ho Chun Yan.jpg Alan Leong Kah-kit.jpg
Leader Albert Ho Alan Leong
Party Democratic Civic
Alliance Pro-democracy Pro-democracy
Seats won 14 13

The 2011 Election Committee Subsector Elections took place between 7:30 am and 10:30 pm on 11 December 2011. The Election Committee Subsector Elections are a part of the contemporary political process of Hong Kong. The election's purpose is to decide the 1,044 members of the Election Committee of Hong Kong. The resulting Election Committee is then responsible for electing the Chief Executive of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) in the 2012 Election.

Background[edit]

The breakthrough of the electoral reform in 2010 changed the membership of the Election Committee for the first time which expanded the size of the Election Committee from 800 members to 1,200 members. Each sector were allocated 100 more seats proportionally and the 10 Special Members were elected to fill the vacancy of the 10 new ex officio members Legislative Council which was also expanded from 60 to 70 seats in the electoral reform but was to be elected in the following September election. The Special Members were 4 in the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference Subsector and 2 in the Heung Yee Kuk, the Hong Kong and Kowloon District Councils, and the New Territories District Councils respectively.

Composition[edit]

The Election Committee consisted of 1,044 [1,034] members elected from 35 subsectors, 60 members nominated by the Religious Subsector and 96 [106] ex officio members. (Hong Kong deputies from the National People's Congress and Legislative Council of Hong Kong members). As the term of office commenced on 1 February 2012, the 1,200 member Election Committee was formed by 38 Election Committee Sub-sectors:[1]

  1. Heung Yee Kuk (28) [26]
  2. Agriculture and Fisheries (60)
  3. Insurance (18)
  4. Transport (18)
  5. Education (30)
  6. Legal (30)
  7. Accountancy (30)
  8. Medical (30)
  9. Health Services (30)
  10. Engineering (30)
  11. Architectural, Surveying and Planning (30)
  12. Labour (60)
  13. Social Welfare (60)
  14. Real Estate and Construction (18)
  15. Tourism (18)
  16. Commercial (First) (18)
  17. Commercial (Second) (18)
  18. Industrial (First) (18)
  19. Industrial (Second) (18)
  20. Finance (18)
  21. Financial Services (18)
  22. Sports, Performing Arts, Culture and Publication (60)
  23. Import and Export (18)
  24. Textiles and Garment (18)
  25. Wholesale and Retail (18)
  26. Information Technology (30)
  27. Higher Education (30)
  28. Hotel (17)
  29. Catering (17)
  30. Chinese Medicine (30)
  31. Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (55) [51]
  32. Employers' Federation of HK (16)
  33. HK and Kowloon District Councils (59) [57]
  34. New Territories District Councils (62)
  35. HK Chinese Enterprises Association (16)
  36. National People's Congress (36)
  37. Legislative Council (60) [70]
  38. Religious (60)

Note: Figures in brackets denotes the number of members and figures in square brackets denotes the number of members commencing in October 2012.

Number of members nominated by the six designated bodies of the religious sub-sector:

Nominations[edit]

The nomination period for the elections was between 8 and 15 November 2011 (The Hong Kong and Kowloon District Councils, and the New Territories District Councils Sub-sectors had a nomination period between 18 and 24 November 2011).[1]

Forums[edit]

Two candidate forums were arranged for all candidates and each forum was divided into two sessions. Candidates numbered 1–21 attended the first session on 23 October 2011, whilst candidates numbered 22–42 attended the second session on the 20 and 23 October 2011.

Election results[edit]

Results by subsectors[edit]

Statistics are generated from the official election website:

Sector Subsector Registered
voters
Candidates Elected Votes Turnout
I Catering 7,895 34 17 1,126 14.26
I Commercial (First) 817 21 18 454 55.57
I Commercial (Second) 1,783 18 18 uncontested
I Employers' Federation of Hong Kong 122 16 16 uncontested
I Finance 125 18 18 uncontested
I Financial Services 539 29 18 372 69.02
I Hong Kong Chinese Enterprises Association 321 16 16 uncontested
I Hotel 99 19 17 75 75.76
I Import and Export 1,434 18 18 uncontested
I Industrial (First) 610 18 18 uncontested
I Industrial (Second) 695 18 18 uncontested
I Insurance 121 19 18 90 74.38
I Real Estate and Construction 754 18 18 uncontested
I Textiles and Garment 3,188 18 18 uncontested
I Tourism 1,063 25 18 616 57.95
I Transport 196 21 18 157 80.10
I Wholesale and Retail 6,733 23 18 1,960 29.11
I Sub-total for First Sector 26,828 349 300 4,850 27.77
II Accountancy 24,630 65 30 7,617 30.93
II Architectural, Surveying and Planning 6,778 78 30 2,746 40.51
II Chinese Medicine 5,864 71 30 2,273 38.76
II Education 86,618 65 30 20,084 23.19
II Engineering 9,052 49 30 3,856 42.60
II Health Services 39,128 67 30 5,784 14.78
II Higher Education 9,106 46 30 2,829 31.07
II Information Technology 5,522 61 30 2,264 41.15
II Legal 6,583 66 30 2,329 35.38
II Medical 11,118 83 30 3,787 34.06
II Sub-total for Second Sector 204,399 651 300 53,569 26.21
III Agriculture and Fisheries 159 60 60 uncontested
III Labour 591 78 60 432 73.10
III Religious N/A 60 60 no election
III Social Welfare 14,415 164 60 6,100 42.32
III Sports, Performing Arts, Culture and Publication 2,358 60 60 uncontested
III Sub-total for Third Sector 17,523 422 300 6,532 43.53
IV National People's Congress N/A 36 36 ex officio
IV Legislative Council N/A 60 60 ex officio
IV Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference 141 55 55 99 70.21
IV Heung Yee Kuk 147 30 28 130 88.44
IV Hong Kong and Kowloon District Councils 200 65 59 188 94.00
IV New Territories District Councils 212 66 62 197 92.92
IV Sub-total for Fourth Sector 700 312 300 614 87.71
TOTAL 249,450 1,734 1,200 65,565 27.60

Result by affiliations[edit]

The election results are generated from the official election website. The political affiliations are according to the candidate's self-proclaimed affiliations shown on the election platforms, as well as from the news.[table 1]

e • d Summary of the 11 December 2011 Election Committee Subsector election results
Affiliation 1st Sector 2nd Sector 3rd Sector 4th Sector Total
Standing Elected Standing Elected Standing Elected Standing Elected Standing Elected
Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong 12 10 2 2 9 5 61 61 84 78
Liberal Party 14 13 2 1 5 5 21 19
A16 Alliance 16 15 16 15
ICT Energy 24 8 24 8
Federation of Hong Kong and Kowloon Labour Unions 10 8 10 8
Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions 2 1 2 2 3 3 7 6
Civil Force 5 5 5 5
New Territories Association of Societies 4 4 4 4
Education Convergence 6 3 6 3
New People's Party 1 1 2 2 3 3
Your Vote Counts 6 2 6 2
Y5 Give Me Five 5 2 5 2
Hong Kong Federation of Education Workers 3 1 3 1
Government Disciplined Services General Union 2 1 2 1
Hong Kong Women Teachers' Organization 2 1 2 1
New Century Forum 1 1 1 1
Welfare Empower Hong Kong 23 0 23 0
Vox Pop 12 0 12 0
Estimated pro-Beijing individuals and others 320 275 386 131 245 165 130 124 1,081 695
Total for pro-Beijing camp 349 300 465 167 291 181 210 204 1,315 852
Demo-Social 60[table 2] 31 29 31 29
Hong Kong Social Workers' General Union 29 28 29 28
ProDem22 22 22 22 22
IT Voice 2012[table 3] 19 19 19 19
Hong Kong Professional Teachers' Union[table 4] 17 17 17 17
Democratic Party 18 14 5 0 23 14
Civic Party 14 13 1 0 15 13
Academics In Support of Democracy[table 5] 13 13 13 13
Democratic Accountants 9 9 9 9
Progressive Social Work 8 2 8 2
Hong Kong Association for Democracy and People's Livelihood 2 2 2 2
Neo Democrats 2 2 2 2
Engineers for Universal Suffrage[table 6] 6 1 6 1
Pro-democratic individuals and others 2 2 2 2
Total for pro-democracy camp 124 114 68 59 6 0 198 173
Hong Kong Medical Association 30 15 30 15
Action 9 9 2 9 2
Public Surgeons' United 8 2 8 2
Hong Kong Chinese Medicine Practitioners' Rights General Union 11 0 11 0
Hong Kong Public Doctors' Association 4 0 4 0
Hong Kong and Kowloon Trades Union Council 3 0 3 0
Total (turnout 27.60%) 349 300 651 300 362 240 216 204 1,578 1,044
  1. ^ Note 1: Candidates who are members of political party but do not state in their platforms may not be shown in this table, for example Elizabeth Quat in the Information Technology Subsector election who did not state her Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong membership is not counted as DAB candidate in this table.
  2. ^ Note 2: Democratic Party's candidate in this group will be counted as the Demo-Social 60 members in this table as they state in their election platforms.
  3. ^ Note 3: The group had total of 20 candidates in total but one of them, Sin Chung-kai, is counted as Democratic Party's candidate in this table as he states in his election platform.
  4. ^ Note 4: The group had total of 25 candidates in total but 7 of them are counted as Democratic Party's candidates and one is counted as Civic Party's candidate in this table as they state in their election platforms.
  5. ^ Note 5: The group had total of 24 candidates in total but 11 of them are counted as their party's candidates in this table as they state in their election platforms.
  6. ^ Note 6: The group had total of 8 candidates in total but two of them are counted as Civic Party's candidate in this table as they state in their election platforms.

Overview of outcome[edit]

There were total of 11 subsectors being uncontested, most of them are in the First Sector where the business interests are rooted. Nevertheless the election became much more competitive as supporters of both Henry Tang and Leung Chun-ying, the two potential candidates for the 2012 Chief Executive race, tried to gain as much seats. The pan-democracy camp secured the 150-member threshold to nominate a candidate to challenge to pro-Beijing dominated Chief Executive election in the following year.

Catering Subsector[edit]

The Catering Subsector was contested by two candidate lists the Cater17, led by the Catering Legislative Councillor Tommy Cheung Yu-yan and considered Henry Tang's supporters, and 星火行動, led by Simon Wong Ka-wo and considered Leung Chun-ying's supporters. Total of 34 candidates from the two lists equally contested for 17 seats. The Cater17 list won all 17 seats.[2] Notable elected candidates include Allan Zeman, chairman of the Ocean Park Hong Kong.

Accountancy Subsector[edit]

Many groups contested in the Accountancy Subsector. The A16 Alliance was formed by accountants from the Big Four firms, the group was considered as Henry Tang's camp. 15 of the 16 candidates were elected with Eric Li got the highest votes.[3]

Two groups called "Your Vote Counts" and "Y5 Give Me Five" were supported by member of the Leung Chun-ying's election campaign office and Accountancy Legislative Councillor Paul Chan. "Your Vote Counts" got two of the six candidates elected and "Y5 Give Me Five" got two of the five.[3]

The Action 9 group was formed with 9 candidates with the election platform of increasing supply of public housing, solving the disparity between the rich and poor and implementing universal suffrage. The group stated that they would not rule out to nominate a pan democrat candidate but also said they were open on the idea of nominating Leung Chun-ying.[4] The group got two members elected.[3]

9 candidates from the pan-democracy were all elected to the Accountancy Subsector.

Chinese Medicine Subsector[edit]

The Hong Kong Chinese Medicine Practitioners' Rights General Union challenged the pro-Beijing groups' dominance in the Chinese Medicine Subsector but all 11 candidates failed to get elected.[5]

Education Subsector[edit]

The Education Subsector has been the stronghold of pan-democracy camp. The pro-democratic Hong Kong Professional Teachers' Union put out a 25-candidate list for the 30 seats in the Subsector in which five of them are also the Democratic Party members. All candidates were successfully elected including Ip Kin-yuen who won the Education functional constituency seat in the Legislative Council election in the following year.[6]

The pro-Beijing Hong Kong Federation of Education Workers got only one seat. The Education Convergence had 6 candidates and 3 of them were also elected.[6] One of the two candidates from the Hong Kong Women Teachers' Organization were also elected.

Engineering Subsector[edit]

Sponsored by the Professional Commons, the pro-democratic group "Engineers for Universal Suffrage" (E4US) put out an 8-candidate list in which two of them are Civic Party members including Albert Lai. Only Albert Lai and one other pan democrat were elected. Other elected members included Lo Wai-kwok who won the Engineering functional constituency in the Legislative Council in September 2012, and Mak Chai-kwong who was appointed Secretary for Development in July 2012 by Leung Chun-ying.

Higher Education Subsector[edit]

In succession to the 15 candidates group "Academics In Support of Democracy" in 2006 for the previous Election Committee Subsector election, the group had 24 candidates running for 30 seats in this election.[7] Many of them are with party membership such as Joseph Cheng Yu-shek, Kenneth Chan Ka-lok, and Kuan Hsin-chi are from the Civic Party, Helena Wong Pik-wan from the Democratic Party, and two from the Neo Democrats including Chan King-ming.

Information Technology Subsector[edit]

IT Voice 2012 is an election coalition for the Information Technology Subsector election formed by a group of pan democrats including Sin Chung-kai and Charles Mok. All 20 candidates were elected.[8] The pro-Beijing ICT Energy including DAB member Elizabeth Quat got only 8 of the 24 members elected.[9] The Other two elected candidates without affiliation included Ricky Wong.

Legal Subsector[edit]

22 pro-democratic independent candidates led by former chairman of the Hong Kong Bar Association Edward Chan King-sang formed the "ProDem22"[10] and 8 candidates from the Democratic Party, Civic Party, and the Association for Democracy and People's Livelihood formed the "PanDem8" while the vice-chairman of the Law Society of Hong Kong Ambrose Lam San-keung led another 12 candidates group "Vox Pop" which was considered pro-Beijing. The 30 pan democrat candidates were able to collect all seats while "Vox Pop" failed to get any seat.

Medical Subsector[edit]

The Medical Subsector was the most competitive subsector in the election with total 83 candidates running for 30 seats. The Hong Kong Medical Association filled in 30 candidates and half of them got elected. A list led by Ko Wing-man got 2 of the seven candidates elected. The Public Surgeons' United also got 2 of the 8 candidates elected while the Hong Kong Public Doctors' Association failed to win a seat. The 5 members pro-democratic group won 2 seats including the former Legislative Councillor for the Medical functional constituency Kwok Ka-ki.[11]

Religious Subsector[edit]

10 Election committee members are nominated by the Hong Kong Christian Council (HKCC), which was enlisted as the designated body for the Christian (Protestant) Sub-subsector. HKCC decided to adopt the “one Christian, one vote” method. The voting date was 30 October 2011. A total of 42 candidates were nominated. 17,380 of the 18,051 votes were counted as effective while there were 554 void votes and 117 blank votes. The result was considered as a landslide victory of the pro-Beijing faction.[12]

Social Welfare Subsector[edit]

The Social Welfare Subsector was another stronghold of the pan-democracy camp. The Demo-Social 60 filled in 31 candidates in which many of them are the Democratic Party members such as Law Chi-kwong and Yeung Sum.[13] 29 candidates were elected. The pro-democratic social workers' union Hong Kong Social Workers' General Union also had 29 candidates in which 28 of them were elected. A smaller pro-democratic group Progressive Social Work also had 2 of the 8 candidates elected.

The pro-Beijing Welfare Empower Hong Kong failed to win any seat.

District Councils Subsectors[edit]

The pro-Beijing camp won a landslide victory in the Hong Kong and Kowloon District Councils Subsector and the New Territories District Councils Subsector following the major success in the District Council elections in November. The DAB became the largest winner with 55 seats, 26 in the Hong Kong and Kowloon District Councils Subsector and 29 in the New Territories District Councils Subsector. The pan-democracy candidates list failed to win any seat.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2011 Election Committee Subsector Eelctions - Facts and Figures". Electoral Affairs Commission. 
  2. ^ "飲 食 界 星 火 行 動 名 單 全 落 敗   鑽 石 名 單 當 選". Radio Television Hong Kong (in Chinese). 12 December 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "「 A16 聯 盟 」 大 部 份 成 員 當 選 會 計 界 選 委". Radio Television Hong Kong (in Chinese). 12 December 2011. 
  4. ^ "旗幟鮮明:9會計師「起動」跨領域專業力量". Wen Wei Po (in Chinese). 11 November 2011. 
  5. ^ "焦點界別:中醫界 工會抗衡建制派". Apple Daily (in Chinese). 9 November 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "教協25人當選教育界選委". Radio Television Hong Kong (in Chinese). 12 December 2011. 
  7. ^ "Bringing the Voice of Genuine Democracy into the Chief Executive Election". Academics In Support of Democracy. 
  8. ^ "Members". IT Voice 2012. 
  9. ^ ""ICT Energy" 24 Members「ICT動力」24聯票組合". Facebook. 
  10. ^ "ProDem22 - Mission". 
  11. ^ "醫學界選委泛民取兩席". Commercial Radio Hong Kong. 12 December 2012. 
  12. ^ "基督教界選委選舉結果:親建制大勝 廢票大增". 時代論壇 (in Chinese). 31 October 2011. 
  13. ^ "Demo-Social 60". facebook.