2011 IPC Athletics World Championships

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5th IPC Athletics World Championships
2011 IPC world champs logo.gif
Host city Christchurch, New Zealand
Nations participating 80[1]
Athletes participating 1060
Dates 21 – 30 January
Main venue QEII Stadium
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The 2011 IPC Athletics World Championships was held in Christchurch, New Zealand from January 21 to 30, 2011. Athletes with a disability competed, and the Championships was a qualifying event for the London 2012 Paralympic Games.[2]

Over 1000 athletes competed, including Oscar Pistorius, the Blade Runner, who competed in class T44 at the 100m, 4x100m relay, 200m, and 400m events.

A warm-up meet, with free entry for the audience, was held on Friday January 14.[3]

Estimates placed the total visitor spend in the city at around $12 million.[4]

Venue[edit]

Queen Elizabeth II Park
Location: Christchurch
Capacity: 20,000

The Championship was staged in the 20,000-seat Queen Elizabeth II Park stadium which was built in 1973.

Coverage[edit]

At least 120 journalists from 13 countries reported on the Championships. The countries included Brazil, Egypt, Finland, Switzerland, Algeria, Australia, Colombia and the United Kingdom.[5]

The internet-TV channel ParalympicSport.TV, owned by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), in conjunction with Sky Television and Kordia, broadcast daily live coverage of the Championships.[6] ParalympicSport.TV also added clips to their YouTube channel.

Events[edit]

Opening ceremony[edit]

The opening ceremony was held at Cathedral Square on Friday January 21 as a free event.[7] Over 1000 athletes paraded through the streets of Christchurch. At Cathedral Square, the athletes were greeted by a Pōwhiri, a Māori welcoming ceremony. The New Zealand flag was raised and the national anthem performed. The Championships were Officially opened by the Prime Minister of New Zealand, Rt Hon. John Key.[8][9]

Classification[edit]

  • F = field athletes
  • T = track athletes
  • P = pentathlon
  • 11-13 – visually impaired, 11 and 12 compete with a sighted guide
  • 20 – intellectual disability
  • 31-38 – cerebral palsy
  • 41-46 – amputation, les autre
  • 51-58 – wheelchair athletes

Where there are more than one classification in one event, (for example discus throw F54/55/56), a percentage system is used to determine who's the winner.

Schedule[edit]

[10][10] [11][12] The 1st and 2nd placed athletes in any individual medal event on the London 2012 Paralympic Games Programme, qualify the NPC for one (1) qualification slot (per placing) for the London 2012 Paralympic Games.[13]

 ●  Opening ceremony     Events  ●  Closing ceremony
Date → 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
100 m Men
Details
T11, T53, T54 T11, T36, T37, T38, T53, T54 T11, T13, T34, T35, T36, T37, T38, T51, T52 P11-13, T34, T42, T44, T46 T12, T42, T44, T46
Women
Details
T13, T52, T53, T54 T53, T54 T11, T34, T46 T11, T12, T35, T36, T37, T38, T42, T44, T46 T36, T37, T38, T44
200 m Men
Details
T34, T35, T51 T34, T42, T44, T46, T52 T42, T44, T46, T54 T37, T38, T53, T54 T13, T36, T37, T38, T53, T54 T12, T13, T36 T11 T11, T12
Women
Details
T11, T12, T34, T36, T37, T38, T46 T11, T12, T36, T37, T38, T46 T52, T53 T44, T53, T54 T13 T35
400 m Men
Details
T12 T12 T11, T52 T11, T34, T46, T52, T53, T54 T36, T38, T46, T53, T54 T13, T36, T37, T38, T44
Women
Details
T11 T11, T12, T52 T12, T46 T37, T53, T54 T13, T37, T53, T54
800 m Men
Details
T54 T53, T54 T46 T13, T36 T11, T12, T13, T36, T37, T52 T11, T12
Women
Details
T53, T54 T11 T52 T11
1500 m Men
Details
T52 T13, T36 T11, T12, T46 P11-13, T11, T54 T12, T37, T54 T20 F20
Women
Details
T12 T12, T13 T54 T20, T54
5000 m Men
Details
T46 T54 T52 T11, T52 T11, T12, T54
Women
Details
T54
10,000 m Men
Details
T54 T11, T12, T54
Marathon Men
Details
T11, T12, T46, T54
Women
Details
T54
4×100 m relay Men
Details
T11-13 T11-13, T35-38 T42-46
Women
Details
T35-38 T11-13
4×400 m relay Men
Details
T53/54 T53/54
Women
Details
T53/54
Long jump Men
Details
F13, F37/38, F42, F46 F46 P11-13, F36, F44 F20 F11
Women
Details
F11, F42 F20, F44/46 F13, F38
Triple jump Men
Details
F11 F12, F46
High jump Men
Details
F46 F13 F42
Pentathlon Men
Details
P11-13
Shot put Men
Details
F12, F32/33, F34 F12, F35/36 F11, F52/53, F57/58 F40, F42 F54/55/56 F37/38 F44/46 F20
Women
Details
F42/44/46 F32/33/34, F40, F52/53, F57/58 F32/33/34, F37 F37 F11, F12 F35/36 F20, F35/36 F54/55/56
Discus throw Men
Details
F11 F37/38 F32/33/34, F37/38, F40 P11-13, F32/33/34, F46 F44, F57/58 F42, F51/52/53 F12, F35/36, F54/55/56
Women
Details
F12 F37 F54/55/56 F35/36, F40, F51/52/53, F57/58
Javelin throw Men
Details
F35/36, F46 F42, F44, F46 F54/55/56 P11-13 F37/38 F11, F33/34 F40, F57/58 F13, F52/53
Women
Details
F13 F13, F57/58 F38 F54/55/56 F33/34/52/53, F46
Club throw Men
Details
F31/32/51
Women
Details
F31/32/51
Ceremonies

Medalists[edit]

The sighted guides who run together with athletes with a visual impairment at the Championship, did not receive a medal. This will change for the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London. For the first time, also guides at a major international athletics event will receive medals.[14] In Paralympic winter sports, such as alpine skiing, biathlon and cross-country skiing the guides receive medals, for example at the 2010 Winter Paralympics. In Paralympic tandem cycling events, the pilots receive medals, for example at the 2008 Summer Paralympics.

Medal table[edit]

[15]       Host nation (New Zealand)

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  China 21 22 15 58
2  Russia 18 11 6 35
3  Great Britain 12 10 16 38
4  Brazil 12 10 8 30
5  Poland 12 7 6 25
6  USA 9 10 15 34
7  Ukraine 8 10 9 27
8  Germany 8 8 8 24
9  Australia 8 8 7 23
10  South Africa 8 7 9 24
11  Algeria 8 6 7 21
12  Tunisia 8 6 5 19
13  France 8 4 4 16
14  Mexico 6 2 4 12
15  Cuba 6 0 0 6
16  Spain 4 4 9 17
17  Canada 4 4 4 12
18  Japan 3 5 14 22
19  Azerbaijan 3 1 2 6
20   Switzerland 2 8 2 12
21  Morocco 2 3 4 9
22  Iran 2 2 4 8
23  Croatia 2 2 1 5
23  Egypt 2 2 1 5
25  Ireland 2 1 0 3
25  United Arab Emirates 2 1 0 3
27  Belarus 2 0 2 4
28  Cyprus 2 0 0 2
28  Latvia 2 0 0 2
30  Greece 1 5 4 10
31  Kenya 1 4 3 8
32  Iraq 1 4 0 5
33  Portugal 1 3 1 5
33  Serbia 1 3 1 5
35  Czech Republic 1 2 3 6
36  Bulgaria 1 2 1 4
36  Finland 1 2 1 4
38  Austria 1 1 3 5
38  Thailand 1 1 3 5
40  Chile 1 1 0 2
40  HKG 1 1 0 2
42  Lithuania 1 0 1 2
42  Sweden 1 0 1 2
44  Belgium 1 0 0 1
44  Denmark 1 0 0 1
46  Venezuela 0 3 2 5
47  Slovenia 0 3 1 4
48  Colombia 0 2 3 5
49  Ethiopia 0 2 1 3
50  Slovakia 0 2 0 2
51  Netherlands 0 1 4 5
52  Korea 0 1 2 3
53  Jordan 0 1 1 2
53  Namibia 0 1 1 2
55  India 0 1 0 1
55  Fiji 0 1 0 1
55  Italy 0 1 0 1
55  Norway 0 1 0 1
 New Zealand 0 0 0 0
Total 202 202 199 603

Changes in medal standings[edit]

List of changes in medal standings
Ruling date Sport Event NPC Gold Silver Bronze Total
7 April 2011 Men's discus throw F42  South Africa -1 -1
 Belgium +1 -1
 Great Britain +1 -1
 Greece +1 +1

Highlights[edit]

Records[edit]

At the competition, 57 world records, 173 Championship records, and a number of area records and national records were broken.[16][17]

Day 0 (21st)[edit]

Opening ceremony.

Day 1 (22nd)[edit]

There were seven world records: Brazil’s Terezinha Guilhermina in the women’s 200m T11 with a time of 24.74, China’s Yuxi Ma (F37) in the men’s long jump F37/38 with a length of 6.07m, France’s Arnaud Assoumani in the men’s long jump F46 twice, first with a length of 7.36m, then with 7.58m, Algeria's Karim Bettina (F32) in the men’s shot put F32/33 final with a length of 10.89m and in the same event Algeria's Kamel Kardjena (F33) with 12.24m, France’s Thierry Cibone in the men’s shot put F34 with a length of 11.53m, China’s Liangmin Zhang (classification F11) with a world record throw in the women’s discus throw F12 (included both F11 and F12) with 40.42, which gave her a silver medal, while Croatia’s Marija Ivekovic (F12) took the gold medal.[18]

Day 2 (23rd)[edit]

Eight World records: Mexico’s Angeles Ortiz Hernandes (F58) in the women’s shot put F57/58 final with the length of 11.21m, Poland's Pawel Piotrowski (F36) in the men’s shot put F35/36 with a throw of 13.77m, Australia’s Kelly Cartwright set a world record and took Australia's first gold medal in the women’s long jump F42 with a length of 4.19m, China’s Mingjie Gao in the men’s javelin T44 final with 59.82m, Poland’s Tomasz Blatkiewicz (F37) in the men’s discus F37/38 with a length of 53.00m after Ukraine’s Mykola Zhabnyak (F37) had broken it first with 52.48m, Egypt’s Mostafa Fathalla Mohammed in the men’s 100m T37 heat with a time of 11.64 sec, and two records in the women’s shot put F32/33/34: Germany’s Brigit Kober (classification F34) with a length of 9.30m, and Greece’s Maria Stamatoula (F32) with 6.60m.[19]

Day 3 (24th)[edit]

Brazil's Yohansson Nascimento (T45) set a world record for classification T45 in the men's 200m race T46 (included T45 and T46 classified athletes) with a time of 22.35 and won the silver medal while Antonis Aresti (T46) of Cyprus did not set a record for T46, but won the gold medal with a time of 22.25.

Other world records: Egypt’s Mostafa Fathalla Mohamed in the men’s 100m T37 final with a time of 11.61, the Ukraine's team (Viktoriya Kravchenko, Maryna Snisar, Oksana Krechunyak, Inna Dyachenko) in the women’s 4x100m relay F35-38 with a time of 55.07, Brazil’s Terezinha Guilhermina in the women’s 100m T11 heats with a time of 12.13, Russia’s Alexy Kuznetsov (F54) in the men’s javelin throw F54/55/56 with a length of 29.44m, Serbia’s Tanja Dragic (F12) in the women’s javelin throw F13 with a length of 36.74m, Latvia’s Aigars Apinis (F52) in the men’s shot put F52/53 with a length of 10.03m, Russia’s Alexey Ashapatov (F58) in the men’s shot put F57/58 with the length of 16.37m, Paschalis Stathelakos of Greece, in the men’s discus throw F40 with the length 40.92, and Algeria's Lahouari Bahlaz (F32) in the men’s discus throw F32/33/34 with a length of 20.30m.[20]

Day 4 (25th)[edit]

Brazil's Odair Santos set a world record in the men's 1500m T11 with 4:04.70, Terezinha Guilhermina of Brazil set a world record in the women’s 100m T11 with a time of 12.13sec. Other world records: Markus Rehm of Germany in the men’s long jump F44 with a jump of 7.09m, Algeria's Lahouari Bahlaz in the men’s club throw F31/32/51 with a length of 36.73m, and Algeria’s Hocine Gherzouli in the men’s shot put F40 with the length 12.21m.[21]

Day 5 (26th)[edit]

In the 100m T44 men final, America's Jerome Singleton and South Africa's Oscar Pistorius battled it out with Singleton securing gold, just 0.002 ahead of Pistorius.[22] Both Singleton and Pistorius were timed in 11.34.[23]

In the 1500m T37 men, Ireland's Michael McKillop won and set a world record with a time of 4:14.81, but did not receive a medal, because only two athletes competed, and there must be a minimum of three competitors.[24]

There were five more world records: Great Britain's Daniel Greaves in the men's discus throw F44 final with a throw of 58.98m, Algeria’s Sofiane Hamdi in the men's 200m T37 final with a time of 23.64secs, Brazil's Yohansson Nascimento in the men’s 100m T46 final with a time of 11.01secs, Russia’s Alexey Ashapatov in the men's discus throw F57/58 final with a throw of 57.64m, and Cuba’s Omara Durand in the women’s 200m T13 final with a time of 24.24secs.[23]

Day 6 (27th)[edit]

There were seven world records: Thierry Cibone of France, in the men’s F33/34 javelin throw with a throw of 35.91m, Egypt’s Ia Abdelwareth in the men’s F37/38 shot put with a throw of 15.58m, Latvia's Aigars Apinis in the men’s F51/52/53 discus throw with a throw of 20.88m, China's team (Ting Zhang, Lisha Huang, Wenjun Liu, Hongzhuan Zhou) in the women's 4X400m relay T53/54 with a time of 3:36.11, Tunisia's Hania Aidi in the women's javelin throw F54/55/56, with a throw of 17.27m, both Ukraine's Mariia Pomazan (F35), with a throw of 10.61m, and China's Qing Wu (F36), with a throw of 9.66m, in the women’s F35/36 shot put.[25]

Day 7 (28th)[edit]

In the men’s F54/55/56 discus throw, there were three world records: Bulgaria’s Mustafa Yuseinov (classification F55) with a throw of 39.42m, Serbia’s Drazenko Mitrovic (F56) with a throw of 31.35m, and Cuba's Leonardo Diaz (F56) with a throw of 43.10m.[26]

There was also a world record in the women's F33/34/52/53 javelin: Birgit Kober of Germany with a throw of 23.54m. In the men’s 800m T37, Ireland’s Michael McKillop, on his birthday, set a world record with a time of 1:58.90.[26]

Day 8 (29th)[edit]

America’s Tatyana McFadden took her 4th gold at the championship (200m, 400m, 800m and 1500m T54).[27]

World records: Mariia Pomazan of the Ukraine, in the women’s discus F35/36 with a throw of 28.73m (1073pts) and Tunisia’s Mohamed Farhat Chida in the men’s 400m T38 with a time of 49.33sec.[27]

Iran’s Seyed Erfan Hosseini Liravi set a world record in the men’s javelin F12/13 with a throw of 61.48m, though the gold medal was won by China's Pengkai Zhu with 61.90. Liravi is classified F13 and Zhu is classified F12, and the world record was for F13 classified athletes.[27] (F12: may recognise the shape of a hand, visual acuity of 2/60, and/or visual field of less than 5 degrees. F13: visual acuity ranges from 2/60 to 6/60, and/or visual field over 5 degrees and less than 20 degrees.)

Day 9 (30th)[edit]

Great Britain's David Weir and Shelly Woods, on January 29, pulled out of the marathon for safety reasons, as the roads around the circuit would not be closed to traffic.[28]

Spain's Alberto Suarez Laso set a world record in the men’s marathon T12 with a time of 2:28:10.[29]

Participating nations[edit]

[30][31][32][33][34]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Todd, Rebecca (January 6, 2011). "Slow ticket sales for paralympics". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  2. ^ FAQs, Official site of the 2011 IPC Athletics World Championship
  3. ^ Australia Set for World Champs Warm-up, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), January 11, 2011
  4. ^ "IPC event brings $12m to Canterbury". The Press. January 31, 2011. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  5. ^ Strong International Media Interest in IPC Athletics World Championships, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), December 22, 2010
  6. ^ ParalympicSport.TV to Broadcast Live Coverage of Athletics World Champs, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), January 14, 2011
  7. ^ Opening ceremony, On Track, Issue 4, Official site of the 2011 IPC Athletics World Championships
  8. ^ Greenhill, Marc (January 21, 2011). "Paralympians parade through Christchurch". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  9. ^ New Zealand Prime Minister Opens 2011 IPC Athletics World Championships, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), January 21, 2011
  10. ^ a b 2012 IPC Athletics World Championships – Preliminary Competition Schedule – Version 1.3, IPC Athletics, December 17, 2010
  11. ^ FAQs, Official site of the 2011 IPC Athletics World Championships
  12. ^ 2012 IPC Athletics World Championships – Final Events Programme, IPC Athletics, December 3, 2010
  13. ^ London 2012 Paralympic Games Qualification Criteria – Athletics, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), February 2011
  14. ^ Exclusive: Guides to be awarded Paralympic medals at London 2012, insideworldparasport.biz, February 12, 2011
  15. ^ Medal Standings, as of 30 JAN 2011, 202 events, Official site of the 2011 IPC Athletics World Championships]
  16. ^ World record in marathon to finish IPC Athletics, International Paralympic Committee, 31 January 2011
  17. ^ RECORDS SET (As of 30 JAN 2011), Official site of the 2011 IPC Athletics World Championships
  18. ^ IPC Athletics World Champs Off to Record Breaking Start, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), 22 January 2011
  19. ^ Field Athletes Dominate the Records on Day Two of the IPC Athletics World Champs, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), 23 January 2011
  20. ^ Pistorius Lights Up Christchurch With 200m Gold as Records Tumble, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), 24 January 2011
  21. ^ Singleton throws down challenge to Pistorius at IPC Athletics, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), 25 January 2011
  22. ^ Pistorius still focused on 2012 after IPC Worlds defeat, Athletics Weekly, January 26, 2011
  23. ^ a b Singleton pips Pistorius in epic 100m at IPC Athletics World Champs, International Paralympic Committee, 26 January 2011
  24. ^ Paralympics: Heartache for McKillop after world-record run, Irish Independent, January 27, 2011
  25. ^ Weir takes third gold at IPC Athletics World Champs, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), 27 January 2011
  26. ^ a b Three World Records in One Event at IPC Athletics World Champs, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), 28 January 2011
  27. ^ a b c Pistorius and McFadden impressive at IPC Athletics World Champs, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), 29 January 2011
  28. ^ David Weir pulls out of IPC marathon over safety fears, BBC, 29 January 2011
  29. ^ World record in marathon to finish IPC Athletics, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), 31 January 2011
  30. ^ Entry List by NPC, Official site of the 2011 IPC Athletics World Championships, January 20, 2011
  31. ^ 2011 IPC Athletics World Championships – Entries by Event, IPC Athletics, December 3, 2010
  32. ^ More Teams Announced for 2011 Athletics Worlds, IPC Athletics, October 7, 2010
  33. ^ Paralympic Team Prepare For NZ, sportinglife.com, January 7, 2011
  34. ^ Oscar to lead SA team, sport24.co.za, January 10, 2011

External links[edit]