2011 Monte Carlo Rally

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2011 Monte Carlo Rally
79ème Rallye Automobile de Monte-Carlo
Round 1 of the 2011 Intercontinental Rally Challenge season
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2011 monte rally logo.png
Host country Monaco Monaco
Rally base Monte Carlo
Dates run January 19 – 22 2011
Stages 13[1] (337.06 km; 209.44 mi)
Stage surface Tarmac and ice
Overall distance 1,341.75 km (833.72 mi)
Results
Overall winner France Bryan Bouffier
France Peugeot France
Crews 120[2] at start, 54 at finish

The 2011 Monte Carlo Rally, officially 79ème Rallye Automobile de Monte-Carlo was the first round of the 2011 Intercontinental Rally Challenge (IRC) season. The rally took place between January 19–22, 2011. The event marked the centenary of the creation of the Monte Carlo Rally, which was first held on January 21, 1911.

Introduction[edit]

The rally started in Valence on Wednesday 19 January and covered over 1341 km including 337 km in thirteen special stages. Stages were run both in daylight and at night and included two passes through the famous Col de Turini on the Friday night.[1] A full capacity 120 entries were registered for the event including Le Mans 24 Hours star Stéphane Sarrazin and WRC brothers Petter and Henning Solberg. This was in addition to the regular IRC participants; Jan Kopecký, Freddy Loix, Bruno Magalhães, Thierry Neuville, Guy Wilks and reigning champion Juho Hänninen.[2]

Eurosport expanded their TV coverage of the event showing twelve of the thirteen stages live as part of a total of fourteen hours of television over the three days of the competition.[3]

Results[edit]

Bryan Bouffier won his first and only IRC rally after a tyre gamble on the second day proved fruitful and lifted him from seventh in the rally standings to the lead. He had a commanding lead of 50 seconds into the final day which proved too much for his rivals and led him to victory. Second went to Škoda's Freddy Loix and third place went to Guy Wilks, after Stéphane Sarrazin incurred a 30-second penalty for checking into service three minutes late after the final stage. Sarrazin finished fourth ahead of 1994 rally winner François Delecour, who was making his return to rallying after a lengthy absence.

Overall[edit]

Pos. Driver Co-driver Car Time Difference Points
1. France Bryan Bouffier France Xavier Panseri Peugeot 207 S2000 3:32:55.6 0.0 25
2. Belgium Freddy Loix Belgium Frédéric Miclotte Škoda Fabia S2000 3:33:28.1 32.5 18
3. United Kingdom Guy Wilks United Kingdom Phil Pugh Peugeot 207 S2000 3:34:15.3 1:19.7 15
4. France Stéphane Sarrazin France Jacques-Julien Renucci Peugeot 207 S2000 3:34:17.5 1:21.9 12
5. France François Delecour France Dominique Savignoni Peugeot 207 S2000 3:34:18.0 1:22.4 10
6. Finland Juho Hänninen Finland Mikko Markkula Škoda Fabia S2000 3:34:24.9 1:29.3 8
7. France Nicolas Vouilloz France Benjamin Veillas Škoda Fabia S2000 3:37:43.4 4:47.8 6
8. Czech Republic Jan Kopecký Czech Republic Petr Starý Škoda Fabia S2000 3:40:41.5 7:45.9 4
9. Italy Giandomenico Basso Italy Mitia Dotta Peugeot 207 S2000 3:41:41.6 8:46.0 2
10. Finland Toni Gardemeister Finland Tomi Tuominen Peugeot 207 S2000 3:42:04.6 9:09.0 1

Special stages[edit]

Day Stage Time Name Length Winner Time Avg. spd. Rally leader
Leg 1
(19 Jan)
SS1 10:05 Le Moulinon – Antraigues 36.87 km France Stéphane Sarrazin 23:35.6 93.76 km/h France Stéphane Sarrazin
SS2 11:40 Burzet – St Martial 41.06 km Finland Juho Hänninen 22:39.6 108.72 km/h Finland Juho Hänninen
SS3 14:11 St-Bonnet-le-Froid – St-Bonnet-le-Froid 25.22 km Finland Juho Hänninen 12:40.0 119.46 km/h
SS4 16:20 St-Bonnet-le-Froid – St-Bonnet-le-Froid 25.22 km Belgium Freddy Loix 12:37.2 119.90 km/h
Leg 2
(20 Jan)
SS5 12:23 St-Jean-en-Royans – Font d'Urle 23.05 km Finland Juho Hänninen 11:51.0 116.71 km/h
SS6 13:04 Cimetiere de Vassieux – Col de Gaudissart 24.13 km France Bryan Bouffier 12:50.0 112.82 km/h
SS7 16:07 St-Jean-en-Royans – Font d'Urle 23.05 km France Bryan Bouffier 14:57.1 92.50 km/h France Bryan Bouffier
SS8 16:48 Cimetiere de Vassieux – Col de Gaudissart 24.13 km France François Delecour 21:16.7 68.04 km/h
Leg 3
(21–22 Jan)
SS9 09:08 Montauban-sur-l'Ouvèze – Eygalayes 29.89 km France Stéphane Sarrazin 17:45.3 101.01 km/h
SS10 19:15 Moulinet – La Bollène Vésubie 23.41 km France Nicolas Vouilloz 16:24.6 85.59 km/h
SS11 19:58 Lantosque – Lucéram 18.81 km Italy Giandomenico Basso 13:28.2 83.79 km/h
SS12 23:25 Moulinet – La Bollène Vésubie 23.41 km France Stéphane Sarrazin 16:08.8 86.99 km/h
SS13 00:08 Lantosque – Lucéram 18.81 km France Stéphane Sarrazin 13:08.9 85.84 km/h

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Itinerary details". www.acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. 22 November 2010. Retrieved 9 December 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "Entry list" (PDF). www.acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. 9 December 2010. Retrieved 9 December 2010. 
  3. ^ Coursey, Scott (9 December 2010). "Rallye Monte-Carlo: IRC fans set for a live television spectacular". www.rallybuzz.com (RallyBuzz). Retrieved 9 December 2010. 

External links[edit]