2011 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament

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2011 NCAA Women's Division I
Basketball Tournament
2011womensfinalfourlogo.jpg
Women's Final Four Logo for 2011
Teams 64
Finals site Conseco Fieldhouse
Indianapolis, Indiana
Champions Texas A&M (1st title)
Runner-up Notre Dame (2nd title game)
Semifinalists Connecticut
Stanford
Winning coach Gary Blair (1st title)
MOP Danielle Adams Texas A&M
NCAA Women's Division I Tournaments
«2010 2012»

The 2011 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament began on March 19, 2011 and concluded on April 5, 2011. The Texas A&M Aggies won the championship, defeating the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 76–70 in the final held at Conseco Fieldhouse (now Bankers Life Fieldhouse) in Indianapolis.[1][2][3]

The tournament was also notable for a historic run by Gonzaga that ultimately ended in the final of the Spokane Region. With the help of two games on their home court and a regional held less than two miles away, the #11-seeded Bulldogs became the lowest seed ever to make a regional final in the history of the women's tournament.[4]

Subregionals[edit]

2011 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament is located in USA
Albuquerque
Albuquerque
Auburn
Auburn
Charlottesville
Charlottesville
Cincinnati
Cincinnati
College   Park
College Park
Columbus
Columbus
Durham
Durham
Knoxville
Knoxville
Salt   Lake City
Salt Lake City
Spokane
Spokane
Bossier     City
Bossier City
Palo Alto
Palo Alto
Storrs
Storrs
University     Park
University Park
Waco
Waco
Wichita
Wichita
2011 NCAA subregionals

The format is the same as the Men's Tournament, except that there are 64 teams; this in turn means there is no "First Four" round. Thirty-one automatic bids for conference champions and 33 at-large bids are available.

Subregionals were played from March 19 through March 22.

The following 16 sites were used for first and second round games:[5]

Regionals and Final Four[edit]

2011 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament is located in USA
Dayton
Dayton
Spokane
Spokane
Dallas
Dallas
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Indianapolis
Indianapolis
2011 NCAA Regionals and Final Four

The Regionals, named for the city rather than the region of geographic importance since 2005, which were held from March 26 to March 29, were at these sites:[5]

NOTES: 1. Unless noted, all sites are on campus.
2. This marked the first time since the NCAA started pre-determining subregional sites that one city hosted both a sub-regional and regional final as Spokane served as a host city twice in the same tournament.

Regional winners advanced to the Final Four held April 3 and 5 at Conseco Fieldhouse (now Bankers Life Fieldhouse) in Indianapolis, hosted by Butler University and the Horizon League as per the NCAA's policy of hosting one of each of the men's and women's Final Four every five years in the home city of the NCAA offices.

Tournament records[edit]

  • Field goals—Maya Moore attempted 30 field goals in the semifinal against Notre Dame, the most ever attempted in a Final Four game.
  • Free throws—Texas A&M completed ten out of ten free throw attempts, tied for the highest percentage free throw shooting by a team in an NCAA Tournament game.
  • Free throws—Marquette completed zero throws in a game against Texas, tied for the fewest number of free throws completed in an NCAA Tournament game.
  • Field goals—Nicole Griffin, Oklahoma, hot 15 of 19 Field goal attempts, the highest field goal completion percentage for an individual in an NCAA Tournament.[6]

Qualifying teams - automatic[edit]

Sixty-four teams were selected to participate in the 2011 NCAA Tournament. Thirty-one conferences were eligible for an automatic bid to the 2011 NCAA tournament. [6] Tennessee continues its record of being present at every NCAA Tournament since the NCAA began sanctioning women's sports in the 1981–82 school year.

Automatic Bids
    Record  
Qualifying School Conference Regular
Season
Conference Seed
Arkansas–Little Rock Sun Belt 23–7 14–2 12
Baylor Big 12 31–2 15–1 1
Bowling Green MAC 28–4 13–3 12
UC Davis Big West 24–8 10–6 16
UCF C-USA 22–10 12–4 13
Connecticut Big East 32–1 16–0 1
Duke ACC 29–3 12–2 2
Fresno State WAC 25–7 14–2 12
Gardner–Webb Big South 23–10 11–5 14
Gonzaga West Coast 28–4 14–0 11
Green Bay Horizon 32–1 18–0 5
Hampton MEAC 26–6 15–1 13
Hartford America East 17–15 11–5 16
James Madison Colonial 26–7 16–2 11
Marist MAAC 30–2 18–0 10
McNeese State Southland 26–6 15–1 15
Montana Big Sky 18–14 10–6 14
Navy Patriot 20–11 10–4 14
Northern Iowa Missouri Valley 27–5 17–1 13
Ohio State Big Ten 22–9 10–6 4
Prairie View SWAC 21–11 14–4 16
Princeton Ivy 24–4 13–1 12
Saint Francis (PA) Northeast 22–11 14–4 13
Samford Southern 25–7 15–5 14
South Dakota State Summit 19–13 12–6 15
Stanford Pac-10 29–2 18–0 1
Stetson Atlantic Sun 20–12 14–7 16
Tennessee SEC 31–2 16–0 1
Tennessee–Martin Ohio Valley 21–10 14–4 15
Utah Mountain West 18–16 7–9 15
Xavier Atlantic 10 28–2 14–0 2

Qualifying teams - at-large[edit]

Thirty-three additional teams were selected to complete the sixty-four invitations.[6]

At-large Bids
    Record  
Qualifying School Conference Regular
Season
Conference Seed
Arizona State Pac-10 20–10 11–7 7
Dayton Atlantic 10 21–11 9–5 11
DePaul Big East 27–6 13–3 3
Florida State ACC 23–7 11–3 3
Georgetown Big East 23–8 9–7 5
Georgia SEC 21–10 10–6 6
Georgia Tech ACC 23–10 9–5 5
Houston C-USA 26–5 16–0 8
Iowa Big Ten 22–8 10–6 6
Iowa State Big 12 22–10 9–7 7
Kansas State Big 12 21–10 10–6 8
Kentucky SEC 24–8 11–5 4
Louisiana Tech WAC 24–7 15–1 10
Louisville Big East 20–12 10–6 7
Marquette Big East 23–8 10–6 8
Maryland ACC 23–7 9–5 4
Miami ACC 27–4 12–2 3
Michigan State Big Ten 26–5 13–3 4
Middle Tennessee Sun Belt 23–7 14–2 11
North Carolina ACC 25–8 8–6 5
Notre Dame Big East 26–7 13–3 2
Oklahoma Big 12 21–11 10–6 6
Penn State Big Ten 24–9 11–5 6
Purdue Big Ten 20–11 9–7 9
Rutgers Big East 19–12 11–5 7
St. John's Big East 21–10 9–7 9
Temple Atlantic 10 23–8 13–1 10
Texas Big 12 19–13 7–9 9
Texas A&M Big 12 27–5 13–3 2
Texas Tech Big 12 22–10 8–8 8
UCLA Pac-10 27–4 16–2 3
Vanderbilt SEC 20–11 10–6 10
West Virginia Big East 23–9 8–8 9

Bids by conference[edit]

Thirty-one conferences earned an automatic bid. In twenty-one cases, the automatic bid was the only representative from the conference. Thirty-three additional at-large teams were selected from ten of the conferences.[6]

Bids Conference Teams
9 Big East Connecticut, DePaul, Georgetown, Louisville, Marquette, Notre Dame, Rutgers, St. John’s, West Virginia
7 Big 12 Baylor, Iowa State, Kansas State, Oklahoma, Texas, Texas A&M, Texas Tech
6 ACC Duke, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Maryland, Miami, North Carolina
5 Big Ten Ohio State, Iowa, Michigan State, Penn State, Purdue
4 SEC Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Vanderbilt
3 Atlantic 10 Xavier, Dayton, Temple
3 Pac-10 Stanford, Arizona State, UCLA
2 C-USA UCF, Houston
2 Sun Belt Arkansas–Little Rock, Middle Tennessee
2 WAC Fresno State, Louisiana Tech
1 America East Hartford
1 Atlantic Sun Stetson
1 Big Sky Montana
1 Big South Gardner-Webb
1 Big West UC Davis
1 Colonial James Madison
1 Horizon Green Bay
1 Ivy Princeton
1 MAAC Marist
1 MAC Bowling Green
1 MEAC Hampton
1 Missouri Valley Northern Iowa
1 Mountain West Utah
1 Northeast Saint Francis (PA)
1 Ohio Valley Tennessee–Martin
1 Patriot Navy
1 Southern Samford
1 Southland McNeese State
1 Summit South Dakota State
1 SWAC Prairie View
1 West Coast Gonzaga

Bids by state[edit]

The sixty-four teams came from thirty states, plus Washington, D.C. Texas had the most teams with six bids. Twenty states did not have any teams receiving bids.[6]

NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 2011
Bids State Teams
6 Texas Baylor, Prairie View, Houston, Texas, Texas A&M, Texas Tech
4 California Fresno State, Stanford, UC Davis, UCLA
4 Florida Stetson, UCF, Florida State, Miami
4 Ohio Bowling Green, Ohio State, Xavier, Dayton
4 Tennessee Tennessee, Tennessee–Martin, Middle Tennessee, Vanderbilt
3 Iowa Northern Iowa, Iowa, Iowa State
3 Pennsylvania Penn State, Saint Francis (PA), Temple
3 North Carolina Duke, Gardner-Webb, North Carolina
2 Connecticut Connecticut, Hartford
2 Georgia Georgia, Georgia Tech
2 Indiana Notre Dame, Purdue
2 Kentucky Kentucky, Louisville
2 Louisiana McNeese State, Louisiana Tech
2 Maryland Navy, Maryland
2 New Jersey Princeton, Rutgers
2 New York Marist, St. John’s
2 Virginia Hampton, James Madison
2 Wisconsin Green Bay, Marquette
1 Alabama Samford
1 Arizona Arizona State
1 Arkansas Arkansas–Little Rock
1 District of Columbia Georgetown
1 Illinois DePaul
1 Kansas Kansas State
1 Michigan Michigan State
1 Montana Montana
1 Oklahoma Oklahoma
1 South Dakota South Dakota State
1 Utah Utah
1 Washington Gonzaga
1 West Virginia West Virginia

Brackets[edit]

* – Denotes overtime period Unless otherwise noted, all times listed are Eastern Daylight Time (UTC-04)[7]

Philadelphia Region[edit]

First round
March 19–20
Second round
March 21–22
Regional Semifinals
March 27
Regional Finals
March 29
                       
1 Connecticut 75
16 Hartford 39
1 Connecticut 64
Storrs, CT
9 Purdue 40
8 Kansas State 45
9 Purdue 53
1 Connecticut 68
5 Georgetown 63
5 Georgetown 65
12 Princeton 49
5 Georgetown 79
College Park, MD
4 Maryland 57
4 Maryland 70
13 Saint Francis (PA) 48
1 Connecticut 75
2 Duke 40
6 Penn State 75
11 Dayton 66
6 Penn State 73
University Park, PA
3 DePaul 75
3 DePaul 56
14 Navy 43
3 DePaul 63
2 Duke 70
7 Iowa State 64
10 Marist 74
10 Marist 66
Durham, NC
2 Duke 71
2 Duke 90
15 Tennessee–Martin 45

Dayton Region[edit]

First round
March 19–20
Second round
March 21–22
Regional Semifinals
March 26
Regional Finals
March 28
                       
1 Tennessee 99
16 Stetson 34
1 Tennessee 79
Knoxville, TN
8 Marquette 70
8 Marquette 68
9 Texas 65
1 Tennessee 85
4 Ohio State 75
5 Georgia Tech 69
12 Bowling Green 58
5 Georgia Tech 60
Columbus, OH
4 Ohio State 67
4 Ohio State 80
13 UCF 69
1 Tennessee 59
2 Notre Dame 73
6 Oklahoma 86
11 James Madison 72
6 Oklahoma 88
Charlottesville, VA
3 Miami 83
3 Miami 80
14 Gardner–Webb 62
6 Oklahoma 53
2 Notre Dame 78
7 Arizona State 45
10 Temple 63
10 Temple 64
Salt Lake City, UT
2 Notre Dame 77
2 Notre Dame 67
15 Utah 54

Spokane Region[edit]

First round
March 19–20
Second round
March 21–22
Regional Semifinals
March 26
Regional Finals
March 28
                       
1 Stanford 86
16 UC Davis 59
1 Stanford 75
Stanford, CA
9 St. John's 49
8 Texas Tech 50
9 St. John's 55
1 Stanford 72
5 North Carolina 65
5 North Carolina 82
12 Fresno State 68
5 North Carolina 86
Albuquerque, NM
4 Kentucky 74
4 Kentucky 66*
13 Hampton 62
1 Stanford 83
11 Gonzaga 60
6 Iowa 86
11 Gonzaga 92
11 Gonzaga 89
Spokane, WA
3 UCLA 75
3 UCLA 55
14 Montana 47
11 Gonzaga 76
7 Louisville 69
7 Louisville 81
10 Vanderbilt 62
7 Louisville 85
Cincinnati, OH
2 Xavier 75
2 Xavier 72
15 South Dakota State 56

Dallas Region[edit]

First round
March 20
Second round
March 22
Regional Semifinals
March 27
Regional Finals
March 29
                       
1 Baylor 66
16 Prairie View 30
1 Baylor 82
Waco, TX
9 West Virginia 68
8 Houston 73
9 West Virginia 78
1 Baylor 86
5 Green Bay 76
5 Green Bay 59
12 Arkansas–Little Rock 55
5 Green Bay 65
Wichita, KS
4 Michigan State 56
4 Michigan State 69
13 Northern Iowa 66
1 Baylor 46
2 Texas A&M 58
6 Georgia 56
11 Middle Tennessee 41
6 Georgia 61
Auburn, AL
3 Florida State 59
3 Florida State 76
14 Samford 46
6 Georgia 38
2 Texas A&M 79
7 Rutgers 76
10 Louisiana Tech 51
7 Rutgers 48
Bossier City, LA
2 Texas A&M 70
2 Texas A&M 87
15 McNeese State 47

Final Four – Indianapolis, Indiana[edit]

National Semifinals
April 3
National Championship Game
April 5
           
1 Connecticut 63
2 Notre Dame 72
2 Notre Dame 70
2 Texas A&M 76
1 Stanford 62
2 Texas A&M 63

Record by conference[edit]

Conference # of Bids Record Win % Round
of 32
Sweet
Sixteen
Elite
Eight
Final
Four
Championship
Game
Big East 9 19–9 .679 9 5 2 2 1
Big 12 7 11–6 .647 3 3 2 1 1
ACC 6 9–6 .600 6 2 1
Big Ten 5 5–5 .500 4 1
SEC 4 6–4 .600 3 2 1
Pac-10 3 5–3 .625 2 1 1 1
Atlantic 10 3 2–3 .400 2
Conference USA 2 0–2 .000
Sun Belt 2 0–2 .000
WAC 2 0–2 .000
Horizon 1 2–1 .500 1 1
West Coast 1 3–1 .750 1 1 1
MAAC 1 1–1 .500 1

Eighteen conferences went 0–1: the America East, Atlantic Sun, Big Sky, Big South, Big West, Colonial, Ivy League, MEAC, MAC, Missouri Valley, Mountain West, Northeast, Ohio Valley, Patriot, Southern, Southland, SWAC and the Summit

All-Tournament Team[edit]

Game Officials[edit]

  • Lisa Jones(Semi-Final)
  • Felicia Grinter (Semi-Final)
  • Denise Brooks (Semi-Final)
  • Lisa Mattingly (Semi-Final)
  • Cameron Inouye (Semi-Final)
  • Susan Blauch (Semi-Final)
  • Dee Kantner (Final)
  • Tina Napier (Final)
  • Michael Price (Final) [6]

Media coverage[edit]

Television[edit]

ESPN has US television rights to all games during the tournament. For the first and second round, ESPN airs select games nationally on ESPN or ESPNU. All other games are aired regionally on ESPN2 and streamed online via ESPN3. Most of the nation gets whip-a-round coverage during this time, which allows ESPN to rotate between the games and focus on the nation on the one that is the closest. The regional semifinals are split between ESPN and ESPN2, and ESPN airs the regional finals, national semifinals, and championship match.[8]

Studio host & analysts[edit]

Commentary teams[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Voepel, Mechelle (April 5, 2011). "Adams, White lead Texas A&M to title". ESPN. Retrieved April 6, 2011. 
  2. ^ Kinkhabwala, Aditi (April 6, 2011). "Texas A&M Wins Women's Basketball Title". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved April 6, 2011. 
  3. ^ Lopresti, Mike (April 6, 2011). "As Texas A&M wins first title, fight for parity continues". USA Today. Retrieved April 6, 2011. 
  4. ^ Associated Press (March 26, 2011). "Courtney Vandersloot, Gonzaga hold off Louisville to earn Elite 8 trip". ESPN. Retrieved April 22, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b "First, Second round Sites For 2011 Tourney Announced". Retrieved October 30, 2009. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Nixon, Rick. "Official 2022 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book". NCAA. Retrieved 22 April 2012. 
  7. ^ Women's Basketball Bracket, NCAA, March 19, 2011
  8. ^ Margolis, Rachel (March 14, 2011). "ESPN Networks to Air All 63 NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Championship Games". ESPN. Retrieved 14 Mar 2011. 

External links[edit]