2012 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 2012 throughout the world.  

Champions[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

  • Regular Season Champions
League Eastern Division Champions Central Division Champions Western Division Champions Wild Card Qualifier 1 Wild Card Qualifier 2
American League New York Yankees Detroit Tigers Oakland Athletics Texas Rangers Baltimore Orioles
National League Washington Nationals Cincinnati Reds San Francisco Giants Atlanta Braves St. Louis Cardinals
  • Postseason
  Wild Card Game
TV: TBS
Division Series
TV: TBS;
MLB Network
League Championship Series
TV: TBS (ALCS);
Fox (NLCS)
World Series
TV: Fox
                                     
    1  New York Yankees 3  
4  Texas Rangers 0     5  Baltimore Orioles 2    
  1  New York Yankees 0  
5  Baltimore Orioles 1     American League
  3  Detroit Tigers 4    
2  Oakland Athletics 2
   
  3  Detroit Tigers 3  
    AL  Detroit Tigers 0
  NL  San Francisco Giants 4
    1  Washington Nationals   2    
4  Atlanta Braves 0     5  St. Louis Cardinals 3    
  5  St. Louis Cardinals 3
5  St. Louis Cardinals 1     National League
  3  San Francisco Giants 4  
2  Cincinnati Reds 2
   
  3  San Francisco Giants 3  

Other Champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Woman Executive of the Year (major or minor league): Darlene Giardina, Rochester Red Wings, International League

Major League Baseball[edit]

BBWAA awards

Major League Baseball awards

Sporting News Awards

Players Choice Awards

Silver Slugger Awards

American League National League
Player Team Position Player Team
Billy Butler Kansas City Royals DH / Pitcher Stephen Strasburg Washington Nationals
A.J. Pierzynski Chicago White Sox Catcher Buster Posey San Francisco Giants
Prince Fielder Detroit Tigers 1st baseman Adam LaRoche Washington Nationals
Robinson Canó New York Yankees 2nd baseman     Aaron Hill Arizona Diamondbacks
Miguel Cabrera Detroit Tigers 3rd baseman Chase Headley San Diego Padres
Derek Jeter New York Yankees Shortstop Ian Desmond Washington Nationals
Josh Hamilton Texas Rangers Outfielder Ryan Braun Milwaukee Brewers
Mike Trout Los Angeles Angels Outfielder Jay Bruce Cincinnati Reds
Josh Willingham Minnesota Twins Outfielder Andrew McCutchen Pittsburgh Pirates

Gold Glove Awards

American League National League
Player Team Position Player Team
Hellickson/Peavy TB Rays/CHI White Sox Pitcher Mark Buehrle Miami Marlins
Matt Wieters Baltimore Orioles Catcher Yadier Molina St. Louis Cardinals
Mark Teixeira New York Yankees 1st baseman Adam LaRoche Washington Nationals
Robinson Canó New York Yankees 2nd baseman     Darwin Barney Chicago Cubs
Adrián Beltré Texas Rangers 3rd baseman Chase Headley San Diego Padres
J. J. Hardy Baltimore Orioles Shortstop Jimmy Rollins Philadelphia Phillies
Alex Gordon Kansas City Royals Left fielder Carlos González Colorado Rockies
Adam Jones Baltimore Orioles Center fielder Andrew McCutchen Pittsburgh Pirates
Josh Reddick Oakland Athletics Right fielder Jason Heyward Atlanta Braves

Other Awards

Minor League Baseball[edit]

Events[edit]

January[edit]

  • January 12 - Major League owners voted to approve a contract extension for two years for commissioner Bud Selig through the 2014 season.[2]

February[edit]

  • February 23 - 2011 National League MVP Ryan Braun wins appeal against 50-game suspension. The suspension was overturned by baseball arbitrator Shyam Das. The Braun case marks the first time a big leaguer has successfully challenged a drug-related penalty in a grievance. According to ESPN sources, Major League Baseball is weighing the possibility of suing in federal court to reverse the decision.[6]

March[edit]

  • March 2 - Major League Baseball expanded its playoff format to 10 teams for the 2012 season, adding a second wild card in each league. The decision establishes a new one-game, wild-card round in each league between the teams with the best records.[7]
  • March 30 - At 49 age, Jamie Moyer became the oldest starting pitcher ever on an Opening Day roster. Moyer joined the Colorado Rockies on this date, which was the 20th anniversary of his being released by the Chicago Cubs. At that time, he had been released three times in three years. He will be 50 in November.[9]

April[edit]

  • April 8 - The Boston Red Sox lost to the Detroit Tigers, 13–12,[13] while the New York Yankees were defeated by the Tampa Bay Rays, 3–0.[14] These results marks the second time in Major League history that both the Red Sox and Yankees started with a 0-3 record. The other was in the 1966 season, in which Boston started 0-5 and finished next-to-last with a 72-90 record, and New York started 0-3 and finished last with a 70-89 record.
  • April 18
    • Bartolo Colón of the Oakland A's pitches eight shutout innings in a 6-0 win over the Los Angeles Angels. The game includes a stretch, from the fifth to the eight inning, in which Colon pitches 38 consecutive strikes, the longest such streak since major league baseball began recording the statistic in 1988.
    • Cliff Lee of the Philadelphia Phillies scatters seven hits over 10 innings to become the first starting pitcher to throw ten shutout innings since Mark Mulder of the St. Louis Cardinals in 2005. Matt Cain of the San Francisco Giants, meanwhile, allows only two hits until being lifted for a pinch-hitter after 9 innings. The two become the first pair of starting pitchers to combine for at least 19 shutout innings since 1999. The Giants win the game 1-0 in walk-off fashion in the bottom of the 11th inning.
  • April 19 - José Altuve, Brian Bogusevic, and Matt Downs of the Houston Astros each hit a triple in the top of the first inning in an 11–4 victory over the Washington Nationals. This was the first time in Astros history that they hit 3 triples in an inning and also tied the club record for most in a game. 1995 was the last time a team had 3 triples in the first inning.[18]
  • April 20 - Fenway Park celebrates its 100th birthday, with about 200 former Boston Red Sox players, managers and coaches coming out for the pre-game introduction. The New York Yankees, however, spoil the party and defeat the Red Sox 6-2 on five home runs, all off starter Clay Buchholz. One of the home runs is Alex Rodriguez' 631st and puts him past former teammate Ken Griffey, Jr. for fifth place on the all-time list. In the first game at Fenway exactly 100 years earlier, the Red Sox had defeated the Yankees' forerunner, the New York Highlanders, 7-6 in 11 innings.[19]
  • April 26
    • Pablo Sandoval of the San Francisco Giants went 1-for-5, extending his season-opening hitting streak to 19 games, a franchise record. Sandoval went into the game tied with Johnny Rucker, who hit in the first 18 games of the 1945 season with the then New York Giants.[24]
    • The New York Mets field an entire starting line-up of home grown talent for the first time since September 19, 1971. With former Mets farmhand José Reyes batting lead-off for the Miami Marlins, the game starts with ten players who began their careers with the Mets on the field at once.[25]

May[edit]

  • May 7 - At Fenway Park, the Baltimore Orioles outlasted the Boston Red Sox, 9–6, in 17 innings. Adam Jones hit a three-run home run in the top of the 17th off designated hitter Darnell McDonald, whom the Red Sox turned to once their bullpen was empty. Orioles DH Chris Davis, who had never pitched an inning in professional baseball, hurled two innings of shutout ball and was credited with the victory.[29] The last time two teams brought in position players to pitch in the same game was on October 4, 1925, when Detroit Tigers' Ty Cobb and St. Louis Browns' George Sisler closed out the second game of a doubleheader on the last day of the season.[30] Davis also struck out five times at the plate to record the first platinum sombrero of the season, and became the eighth player, but first non-pitcher, since 1918 to get a win for a game in which he was striking out five times.[31]
  • May 8
    • Josh Hamilton tied the major league record by hitting four home runs, all of them two-run shots, as he went five-for-five in the Texas Rangers' 10–3 win over the Baltimore Orioles at Candem Yards. It marked the 16th four-home-run game in major league history, and the 6th in the American League. Hamilton added a double, while setting a career-high with eight runs batted in. His 18 total bases in the game broke the club record last set by José Canseco in 1994 against the Seattle Mariners, while the 18 total bases served to set a new league record and was one shy of the major league record posted by Shawn Green in the 2002 season.[32][33]
    • Class-A Greenville Drive (Boston) made history as three pitchers combined to toss the club's first ever no-hitter. Miguel Pena (six innings), Hunter Cervenka (two) and Tyler Lockwood (one) joined forces to defeat the Rome Braves (Atlanta), 1–0. A solo home run by Keury De La Cruz off David Filak in the sixth inning counted for the only run of the game.[34]
  • May 13
    • Joey Votto hit three home runs, including a walk-off grand slam with two outs in the 9th inning, in the Cincinnati Reds' 9-6 victory over the Washington Nationals. Votto, who racked up six RBI and 14 total bases in the game, is the first player ever to have hit three home runs, including a walk-off grand slam, in a game.[35]
  • May 14 - Major League Baseball dropped its 100-game suspension of Colorado Rockies catcher Eliezer Alfonzo for a positive drug test because of the same procedural issues that came up in the Ryan Braun case. Alfonzo became the first player suspended twice for performance-enhancing drugs under the MLB testing program when the commissioner's office announced a 100-game penalty in September 2011. Alfonzo appealed and was notified that MLB had lifted the ban. The dispute came because the storage and shipment of his urine sample was similar to the one that led to Braun's 50-game drug penalty getting overturned by an arbitrator in February of the current year.[36]
  • May 29 - Hideki Matsui became the first player in baseball history to play 10 seasons in Nippon Professional Baseball and 10 seasons in the Major Leagues when he debuted for the Tampa Bay Rays against the Chicago White Sox. Matsui broke a scoreless tie with a two-run home run in his second at-bat in an eventual loss for the Rays. He has also homered in his majors debuts with the Anaheim Angels and the New York Yankees.[45]
  • May 30 - Carlos González hit three home runs in his last three at-bats, en route to a Colorado Rockies 13–5 victory over the Houston Astros. González broke a 5-all tie with a solo shot leading off the bottom of the fifth inning, added a two-run drive in the sixth, and then had another solo shot in the eighth. Michael Cuddyer contributed also with a grand slam in the first frame and Dexter Fowler added a three-run homer in the sixth.[46]

June[edit]

  • June 3 - Magglio Ordóñez officially announced his retirement at Comerica Park. A six-time All-Star, the 38-year-old Ordóñez finished his career with a .309 batting average over 15 seasons with the Detroit Tigers and the Chicago White Sox. His 294 career home runs are the second-most by a Venezuela-born player, trailing only Andrés Galarraga's 399. Among his highlights is the pennant-winning home run in Game 4 of the 2006 AL Championship Series. Then, in 2007 he became the first Tiger to win the batting crown in 46 years. Ordóñez posted a .363 average to claim the American League title, including 28 home runs, 139 runs batted in and a league-best 54 doubles, while his .363 average turned to be the highest by a Detroit player since 1937, when Charlie Gehringer finished with a .371 mark.[50]
  • June 30 - The Texas Rangers (50-29) became the first major league team to reach 50 victories with a 7–2 win, its 17th in 21 games. Josh Hamilton homered and drove in four runs to help make 21-year-old Martín Pérez a winner in his first career start.[64]

July[edit]

  • July 2:
    • Jarrod Parker allowed one run on six hits in 6⅔ innings of work as the Oakland Athletics past the Boston Red Sox. 6–1, at the O.co Coliseum. Parker matched an old record by allowing one run or fewer for the 10th time in 14 career starts, becoming the second pitcher in major league history since Ferdie Schupp to accomplish the feat. Schupp, primarily a reliever, allowed no more than one run in 10 of his first 14 starts for the New York Giants, but he needed five seasons to accomplish it, from 1913 to 1917. Entering the day, Parker had been the second starter since Dwight Gooden to allow no more than one run in nine of his first 13 starts. It was also the seventh time in Parker's past eight starts he has held the opposition to one run or fewer.[65]
    • Billy Hamilton of the High-A Bakersfield Blaze stole his 100th base of the season in just his 78th game of the season. Last year, the Cincinnati Reds minor leaguer became the first player to steal 100 bases in a minor-league season since 2001, ending with 103 in 135 games. According to Baseball America, only 14 of the 119 full-season minor-league teams (not including Bakersfield) have 100 steals on the current season. The record for the most stolen bases at any level of professional baseball is 145, which was set by Vince Coleman in 1983 while playing for the Class-A Macon Redbirds.[66]
  • July 29:
    • Pedro Ciriaco turned out to be the hero once again, this time punching an RBI single in the top of the 10th inning, and the Boston Red Sox defeated the New York Yankees, 3–2, to take the weekend series. Called up July 6 from Triple-A Pawtucket, Ciriaco has go-ahead hits in all three Red Sox victories over the Yankees in nine meetings this season. He is now 11-for-22 with six RBIs in five games against New York, including a ninth-inning, RBI-triple the previous day in an 8–6 comeback victory.[84]
    • The Houston Astros ended their team-record losing streak at 12 games, beating the Pittsburgh Pirates, 9-5, behind a three-run double from Marwin González and a home run from Jordan Schafer, who also drove in three runs. The skid matched the Kansas City Royals (April 11–24) and the Chicago Cubs (May 15–27) for the longest in the major leagues this year. It broke the previous Astros record of 11, set from August 17–28, 1995, and matched over the end of the 2009 season and start of 2010.[85]

August[edit]

  • August 10 - Manny Machado hit two home runs and drove in four runs in his second career MLB game to carry the Baltimore Orioles past the visitors Kansas City Royals, 7–1, at Camden Yards. At 20 years, 35 days old, Machado became the youngest player in major league history to have a multiple home run game in either his first or second career game. The previous youngest player to do this was Manny Ramírez (21 years, 96 days old), who belt two homers in his second career game, at Yankee Stadium on September 3, 1993, leading the Cleveland Indians to a 7–3 win. Machado also became the youngest player in Orioles franchise history, which includes the St. Louis Browns from 1902 to 1953, to hit two or more homers in a game. The previous youngest was Boog Powell (20 years, 258 days old), who did it on May 2, 1962, at Metropolitan Stadium.[90]
  • August 21:
    • Billy Hamilton of the Pensacola Blue Wahoos collected four stolen bases in the first game of a double-header, to eclipse Vince Coleman's 30-year-old record for the most steals in a single season in minor league baseball history. Hamilton, a highly touted prospect of the Cincinnati Reds organization, now has 147 stolen bases in the season. He stole 104 in the first half of the season with Class-A Bakersfield Blaze before being promoted to Double-A Pensacola. The previous record was set by Coleman in 1983, with 145, while playing for Single-A Macon Redbirds. The modern major league record was set by Rickey Henderson with 130 in 1982. Hamilton would end the season with 155 steals.[93]
    • Michael Weiner, who succeeded Donald Fehr as head of the baseball players' union three years ago and negotiated a labor deal last fall in a seamless transition, is undergoing treatment for a brain tumor. The 50-year-old Weiner succeeded Fehr in December 2009 to become just the fourth head of the union since 1966.[94]
  • August 27 - Adrián Beltré of the Texas Rangers was named the American League Player of the Week. Beltré made history, after hitting 433 with three doubles, one triple, five home runs, nine RBIs and seven runs scored in seven games. He belted three home runs in his first three at-bats on August 22 against the Baltimore Orioles, including a pair of two-run blasts as part of a nine-run fourth inning. He also homered against the Minnesota Twins the next day, marking the first time he had homered in back-to-back games this season. A day later, he became the sixth Rangers player to hit for the cycle, going 4-for-4 with three RBIs. It was his second career cycle (Sept. 1, 2008, with the Seattle Mariners – also in Rangers Ballpark – was the other), becoming the first player in the modern era to cycle in the same ballpark as a home and visiting player, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Beltré, who joined Joe DiMaggio (1948) as the only other player in Major League Baseball history to hit for the cycle and hit three homers in the same week, earns his first AL Player of the Week honor after being recognized three times while in the National League with the Los Angeles Dodgers.[97]
  • August 30 - Jonathan Lucroy hit a grand slam and drove in seven runs for the Milwaukee Brewers in their loss to the Chicago Cubs, 12–11, at Wrigley Field. In a slugfest game featuring a combined 31 hits, including 15 extra-bases, Lucroy turned out to be the first catcher to have two games in a single season with 7 or more RBI since Major League Baseball began officially tracking the RBI statistic in 1920 (he first did it on May 20 against the Minnesota Twins). In addition, Lucroy became the first Brewer to collect a pair of seven-RBI games in team history.[100]

September[edit]

  • September 5 - For the second consecutive game, the Washington Nationals tied a franchise record with six home runs in a 9–1 rout of the Chicago Cubs. The Nationals became just the third team in major league history to hit at least six home runs in consecutive games, joining the 1996 Los Angeles Dodgers and the 2003 Anaheim Angels. Two of those six homers were hit by 19-year-old rookie Bryce Harper. It was his second multihomer game of the season, becoming the third player ever with more than one multihomer game in a season as a teenager, joining Mel Ott (1928) and Ken Griffey, Jr. (1989). Harper also is the third teenager with at least 17 homers in a season, trailing only Tony Conigliaro (24, 1964) and Ott (18, 1928).[101]
  • September 14 - At Yankee Stadium, Derek Jeter of the New York Yankees moves into the top 10 on the all-time hits list, beating out an infield single in the fifth inning of the Yankees' 6-4 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays. The hit gives him 3,284 for his career, passing Willie Mays for 10th place. In the eighth inning of the same game, Alex Rodriguez hits his 647th career home run, which gives him 1,889 career runs scored, passing Lou Gehrig for ninth place on the all-time list.[102]
  • September 21:
    • Melky Cabrera was disqualified from the National League batting champion honor at his own request when Major League Baseball and the Players Association agreed to a one-season-only change in the rule governing the individual batting, slugging and on-base percentage champions.[108] The All-Star game MVP, Cabrera was suspended on August 15 for violating the Joint Drug Program and is missing the final 45 games of the regular season. Entering the day with a league-leading .346 batting average, he had 501 plate appearances, one short of the required minimum, but would have won the title under section 10.22(a) of the Official Baseball Rules if an extra hitless at-bat were added to his average and he still finished ahead.[109] He then took the initiative by sending a letter to MLB and the PA. To be plain, I personally have no wish to win an award that would widely be seen as tainted, and I believe that it would be far better for the remaining contenders to compete for that distinction, Cabrera wrote.[108]
    • The Tampa Bay Rays mauled the Toronto Blue Jays, 12–1, as their pitching staff set a new record for combined strikeouts in a single season when James Shields struck out J. P. Arencibia leading off the second inning. With 1,267 strikeouts, the combined efforts of the starting pitchers and the bullpen surpassed the previous record of 1,266, held by the 2011 New York Yankees. The Rays has 11 games remaining to extend its mark. The major league record is 1,404, which was set by the 2003 Chicago Cubs.[110]
  • September 25 - The Los Angeles Angels tie a major league record by striking out 20 opposing batters in a 9-inning game in a victory over the Seattle Mariners. The Angels are the first to do so using multiple pitchers.

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

  • December 5 – The Hall of Fame announces Tom Cheek, who was the lead radio play-by-play announcer for the Toronto Blue Jays from the team's establishment in 1977 until his retirement in 2004, as the 2013 recipient of its Ford C. Frick Award for excellence in baseball broadcasting. Cheek, who died in 2005, will formally receive the honor at the Hall of Fame Awards Presentation.[126]

Deaths[edit]

January[edit]

  • January   2 - Howie Koplitz, 73, pitcher for the Tigers and Senators in parts of five seasons spanning 1961-1966, who also was named Southern Association MVP and TSN Minor League Player of the Year in 1961.
  • January   8 - Glenn Cox, 80, pitcher for the Kansas City Athletics from 1955 to 1958.
  • January 17 - Marty Springstead, 74, former American League umpire from 1966 to 1985, who at the age of 36 in 1973 became the youngest umpire crew chief in World Series history, and also worked in three Series, three All-Star Games and five AL championship series.[129]
  • January 21 - Cliff Chambers, 90, pitcher for the Cubs, Pirates and Cardinals from 1948 to 1953.
  • January 21 - Troy Herriage, 81, pitcher for the 1956 Kansas City Athletics.
  • January 22 - Andy Musser, 74, play-by-play broadcaster for the Philadelphia Phillies during 26 seasons from 1976 through 2001.
  • January 26 - Bud Byerly, 91, pitcher who played for the Cardinals, Reds, Senators, Red Sox and Giants for parts of 11 seasons spanning 1943-1960.
  • January 31 - Rick Behenna, 51, pitcher for the Atlanta Braves and Cleveland Indians in parts of three seasons from 1983 through 1985.

February[edit]

  • February  1 - Herb Adams, 83, backup outfielder who played from 1948 to 1950 with the Chicago White Sox.
  • February  7 - Danny Clyburn, 37, outfielder who played parts of three seasons with the Baltimore Orioles and Tampa Bay Devil Rays in the late 1990s.
  • February 11 - Gene Crumling, 89, catcher for the 1945 St. Louis Cardinals, one of many ballplayers who only appeared in the majors during World War II conflict.
  • February 16 - Gary Carter, 57, Hall of Fame catcher principally with the Montreal Expos and New York Mets. His two-out, tenth-inning single for the Mets in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series, started one of the most improbable rallies in postseason history.
  • February 17 - Howie Nunn, 76, relief pitcher for the Cardinals and Reds in parts of three seasons from 1959 to 1962.
  • February 24 - Agnes Allen, 81, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League pitcher.
  • February 24 - Terry Mathews, 47, relief pitcher for the Marlins, Orioles, Rangers and Royals in part of eight seasons spanning 1991-1999.
  • February 24 - Jay Ward, 73, pitcher for the Twins and Reds in parts of three seasons between 1963 and 1970, who later managed several successful minor league teams.
  • February 25 - Dave Cheadle, 60, relief pitcher for the 1973 Atlanta Braves.

March[edit]

  • March  3 - Lloyd Hittle, 88, pitcher for the Washington Senators from 1949 to 1950.
  • March  3 - Jim Obradovich, 62, first baseman who played briefly for the Houston Astros in 1978.
  • March  4 - Don Mincher, 73, two-time All-Star first baseman and member of the 1972 Oakland Athletics World Series champions, who also has the distinction of being the only major leaguer to play with the Washington Senators franchise that became the Minnesota Twins, and then play with a second incarnation of the Senators which became the Texas Rangers.
  • March  6 - Helen Walulik, 82, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League pitcher and outfield/infield utility.
  • March  9 - Harry Wendelstedt, 73, National League umpire who worked five World Series and four All-Star games during his 33-year career from 1966 through 1998.
  • March 11 - Hub Andrews, 89, relief pitcher for the New York Giants from 1947 to 1948.
  • March 15 - Dave Philley, 91, outfielder and pinch-hitting specialist for eight different teams between 1941 and 1962, who still holds the major league records for most consecutive pinch-hits in a season (nine, 1958) and for most at-bats in an 18-inning double-header (13, 1951), while also holds an American League record for the most pinch-hits in a season (24, 1961).[130]
  • March 20 - Mel Parnell, 89, two-time All-Star pitcher and the winningest left-hander in Boston Red Sox history with 123 wins from 1947 to 1956, who also posted a 25-7 record in 1949 and hurled a no-hitter in 1956.
  • March 24 - Dennis Bennett, 72, pitcher for the Phillies, Red Sox, Mets and Angels between 1962 and 1968.
  • March 31 - Jerry Lynch, 82, Pirates and Reds outfielder, whose 116 career pinch-hits is the 10th-most in Major League Baseball history.

April[edit]

  • April  2 - Allie Clark, 88, outfielder who played from 1947 through 1953 for the New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago White Sox.
  • April  8 - Al Veigel, 95, pitcher for the 1939 Boston Bees.
  • April 10 - Andy Replogle, 58, pitcher for the Milwaukee Brewers from 1978 to 1979.
  • April 17 - Stan Johnson, 75, backup outfielder who played for the Chicago White Sox and Kansas City Athletics between 1960 and 1961.
  • April 18 - John O'Neil, 92, backup shortstop for the 1946 Philadelphia Phillies, who spent more than 45 years spanning 1939-1986 as player, player/manager, manager, general manager and scout.
  • April 24 - Fred Bradley, 91, pitcher for the Chicago White Sox from 1948 to 1949.
  • April 26 - Bill Skowron, 81, eight-time All-Star first baseman and part of five World Series champion teams.
  • April 29 - Daisy Junor, 92, Canadian outfielder who played from 1946 through 1949 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

May[edit]

  • May  5 - Don Leshnock, 65, relief pitcher for the 1972 Detroit Tigers.
  • May  8 - Jerry McMorris, 71, principal owner of the Colorado Rockies from 1992 through 2005.
  • May  9 - Carl Beane, 59, public address announcer for the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park since the 2003 season.
  • May 11 - Frank Wills, 53, pitcher for the Royals, Mariners, Indians and Blue Jays from 1983 through 1991, who won the American League pennant-winning game for Toronto in the 1989 season.
  • May 16 - Kevin Hickey. 56, pitcher for the White Sox and Orioles in part of six seasons spanning 1981-1991.
  • May 16 - Thad Tillotson, 71, relief pitcher for the New York Yankees from 1967 to 1968, who also pitched for the Nankai Hawks in Japan during the 1971 season.

June[edit]

  • June   3 - Pedro Borbón, 65, Dominican reliever for the Cincinnati Reds during 10 seasons, and a key member on the bullpen of the Big Red Machine that won back-to-back World Series titles in 1975 and 1976.
  • June   5 - Hal Keller, 84, backup catcher for the Washington Senators between 1949 and 1952, and later a front office executive for the Texas Rangers and Seattle Mariners in a 25-year career from 1961 through 1985.
  • June   9 - Hawk Taylor, 73, backup catcher for the Milwaukee Braves, New York Mets, California Angels and Kansas City Royals in parts of 11 seasons spanning 1959-1970.
  • June 11 - Dave Boswell, 67, pitcher who posted a 68-56 record and a 3.52 ERA for the Twins, Tigers and Orioles from 1964 through 1971, while leading the American League with a .706 winning percentage in 1966.
  • June 14 - Al Brancato, 93, shortstop for the Philadelphia Athletics in part of four seasons spanning 1939–45.
  • June 24 - Darrel Akerfelds, 50, pitcher for the Athletics, Indians, Rangers and Phillies from 1986 through 1991, and later a bullpen coach for the San Diego Padres from 2001 to 2011.
  • June 28 - Doris Sams, 85, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League outfielder/pitcher; a five-time All-Star and two-time Player of the Year Award winner, who won a batting crown and one home run title, while throwing a perfect game and one no-hitter in a career that spanned from 1946 through 1953.

July[edit]

  • July   1 - Mike Hershberger, 72, Kansas City Athletics right fielder, who led all American League outfielders in assists both in 1965 and 1967.
  • July   2 - Ed Stroud, 72, outfielder for the Chicago White Sox and the Washington Senators from 1966 to 1971.
  • July   7 - Doris Neal, 83, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League infielder/outfielder from 1948 to 1949.
  • July   8 - Chick King, 81, backup outfielder for the Tigers, Cubs and Cardinals in five seasons between 1954 and 1959.
  • July 11 - Art Ceccarelli, 82, pitcher for the Kansas City A's, Cubs and Orioles in part of five seasons spanning 1955-60.
  • July 21 - Marie Kruckel, 88, outfielder and pitcher in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
  • July 24 - Nancy Mudge Cato, 82, All-Star infielder who played for five different teams of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

August[edit]

  • August   1 - Don Erickson, 80, relief pitcher for the 1958 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • August 13 - Johnny Pesky, 92, a 61-year member of the Boston Red Sox spanning 1940-2012, while serving them as a player, manager, coach, broadcaster, and well-esteemed team ambassador.
  • August 22 - Bob Myrick, 59, relief pitcher who played from 1976 through 1978 for the New York Mets.
  • August 29 - Les Moss, 87, catcher who played from 1946 through 1958 for the St. Louis Browns, Boston Red Sox, Baltimore Orioles and Chicago White Sox, and later managed in the minor leagues in 11 seasons spanning 1963-1980.

September[edit]

  • September   8 - Bob Hale, 78, first baseman who played from 1955 through 1961 with the Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians and New York Yankees.
  • September 10 - Tom Saffell, 91, backup outfielder for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Kansas City Athletics in parts of four seasons spanning 1949-1955, who later served as President of the Gulf Coast League from 1979 to 2009.
  • September 11 - Bruce Von Hoff, 68, relief pitcher for the Houston Astros in the 1965 and 1967 seasons.
  • September 13 - Bob DiPietro, 85, backup outfielder for the 1951 Boston Red Sox.
  • September 13 - Jack Pierce, 64, first baseman for the Atlanta Braves and Detroit Tigers in parts of three seasons spanning 1973-75, who also played in Japan with the 1977 Nankai Hawks.
  • September 18 - Jack Kralick, 77, All-Star pitcher and one of the original Minnesota Twins, who posted a 67-65 record and a 3.56 ERA in eight seasons which included stints with the Washington Senators and the Cleveland Indians, while hurling a no-hitter against the Kansas City Athletics in 1962.
  • September 21 - Tom Umphlett, 82, outfielder for the Boston Red Sox and Washington Senators from 1953 through 1955, and later a minor league manager from 1967 to 1970.
  • September 23 - Roberto Rodríguez, 70, Venezuelan pitcher who played for the Kansas City/Oakland Athletics, San Diego Padres and Chicago Cubs between the 1967 and 1970 seasons.

October[edit]

  • October 11 - Champ Summers, 66, outfielder who played 10 seasons in the majors for six different teams, mainly for the Detroit Tigers from 1979 to 1981, and also a hitting coach for the New York Yankees.
  • October 12 - Jim Kremmel, relief pitcher who played from 1973 to 1974 for the Texas Rangers and Chicago Cubs.
  • October 16 - Eddie Yost, 86, All-Star third baseman who led the American League in walks six times during an 18-year career, 14 of them with the Washington Senators spanning 1944-1958.
  • October 20 - Dave May, 68, All-Star outfielder who spent 12 seasons in the majors with the Baltimore Orioles, Milwaukee Brewers, Atlanta Braves, Texas Rangers and Pittsburgh Pirates from 1967–78, and also the player that was sent by Milwaukee to Atlanta in exchange for Hank Aaron.
  • October 25 - Les Mueller, 93, starting pitcher for the Detroit Tigers 1945 World Series championship team, who hurled 19 2/3 innings in a regular game against the Philadelphia Athletics, which remains the longest outing since 1929 when another Tigers pitcher, George Uhle, logged 20 innings against the Chicago White Sox.[132]

November[edit]

  • November   1 - Pascual Pérez, 55, Dominican All-Star pitcher who compiled a lifetime record of 67-68 and a 3.44 ERA with the Braves, Pirates, Braves, Expos and Yankees over an 11-season span from 1980-1991.[133]
  • November   2 - Joe Ginsberg, 86, catcher for the original 1962 New York Mets, who also had stops with the Indians, Kansas City A's, Orioles and White Sox during a 13-year career.
  • November   9 - Harold Gould, 88, Minor league pitcher who had a seven season career between 1942 and 1949, most prominently for the Negro League Philadelphia Stars in 1946 and 1948.
  • November   9 - Lee MacPhail, 95, longtime Major League Baseball executive and the oldest living Hall of Fame member, who also was part of the only father-son duo in the hall along with his father, Larry MacPhail, the man credited with bringing night games to the majors in 1935.
  • November 14 - Gail Harris, 81, first baseman for the New York Giants and Detroit Tigers from 1955-1960, who holds the distinction of being the last player to hit a home run for the Giants before they moved to San Francisco.
  • November 17 - Freddy Schmidt, 96, pitcher who played 15 seasons of professional seasons, four of them for the St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago Cubs spanning 1944-47, also a member of the World Champion Cardinals in 1946 and the Phillies' oldest alumnus.
  • November 22 - Ken Rowe, 78, who pitched professionally for 15 seasons, appearing in the majors from 1963 through 1965 with the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Baltimore Orioles, and later worked during 21 years in the Cleveland Indians organization at virtually every level of the Indians’ minor-league system.
  • November 23 - Chuck Diering, 89, outfielder in part of nine seasons from 1947-56 for the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants and Baltimore Orioles, who was named Orioles Most Valuable Player in their first year in Baltimore after the St. Louis Browns moved there.
  • November 23 - Hal Trosky, 76, who pitched briefly for the Chicago White Sox during the 1958 season.
  • November 24 - Jimmy Stewart, 73, utility man who played every position except pitcher in parts of ten seasons spanning 1963-73, which included stints with the Cubs, Reds, Astros and White Sox.
  • November 27 - Marvin Miller, 95, executive director of the MLB Players Association from 1966 to 1982, who turned the union into one of the most powerful in the country, after negotiating the first collective bargaining agreement in sports history in 1968.
  • November 30 - Rogelio Álvarez, 74, Cuban-born American first baseman for the Cincinnati Reds in parts of the 1960 and 1962 seasons.

December[edit]

  • December 17 - Frank Pastore, 55, middle reliever who posted a 48-58 record with a 4.29 ERA and six saves in 220 games for the Reds and Twins from 1979 to 1986.
  • December 21 - Boyd Bartley, 92, shortstop for the 1943 Brooklyn Dodgers.
  • December 22 - Ryan Freel, 36, outfielder/infielder who played with five different teams in a span of eight seasons, most prominently for the Cincinnati Reds from 2003 through 2008.
  • December 24 - Brad Corbett, 75, who owned the Texas Rangers from 1974 to 1980.

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External links[edit]